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  1. #16

    Default Re: Clock Reassembly Tips (RE: Ed O'Brien)

    I keep trains together with easy to find key chain (like they use on old pull lamps). It's available at hardware stores in any length, and easy to work with. I use 10 to 12 inch pieces. I don't really pay much attention to where the wheels are in the train, since it's usually pretty easy to figure out. Largest to smallest, starting at the bottom. When in question, there's normally only one way they can go.

  2. #17
    Registered User bkerr's Avatar
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    Default Re: Clock Reassembly Tips (RE: Ed O'Brien)

    I use two things that I am not sure you can purchase. The first is a foam block that we get in shipping boxes from a vendor. I have the guys save these for me when they come in. It makes keeping the trains in neat order. Sorry I don't have a pic of that one. The other is a tool that I use in a vise. For me (and like other post) getting to a comfortable eye level is inportant. This tool can be used on vertical and horizontal. I use it to test run as well. It is made from two pieces of square stock that are machined on the front nose a have two threaded holes. A simple T handle allen is all that is necessary to move or adjust.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails clock clamp.jpg  

  3. #18

    Default Re: Clock Reassembly Tips (RE: Ed O'Brien)

    www.timesavers.com and www.merritts.com sell spools of spring wire in several sizes. The finest wire (largest gauge No.) is right for most of the helper springs. The hammer return spring is usually the heavier size. Sometimes it can be easier to just make a new spring and leave the “tail” long and temporarily wrap the tail around the lever arm to keep the spring from uncoiling until you are ready to anchor it after assembly.

    There are several ways to wind the springs. I attach the start of the spring with a couple wraps around the base of the lever. Then it’s a matter of pulling tension on the wire while laying one wrap tight next to another until you have the desired number of coils. The tighter you pull the wire during winding the less it will “open up” when released. It’s really something one needs to get a feel for. You might just get a spool of the wire and practice winding on a small nail to get the feel.

    If you have to “untie” the original spring to remove it, it is almost for sure it will break when you go to re-tie it. Brass spring wire work hardens every time you bend it and becomes even more brittle. If the original wire looks good, one can often slip the loop end over the pillar without untying it but in some cases it can be hard to keep the lever in position during assembly with the spring in place. Each case is a little different.

    There is no easy way to measure how tight to pull up the spring tail when you anchor it. If you pull it too tight the lever may bind or require excessive force to operate. Generally, for the small helper springs, if you can turn the clock upside down and the lever is held in place by the spring tension, then it is probably tight enough.

    On some count wheel clocks it often helps to position the count lever in one of the deep slots of the count wheel and hold it in place with a rubber band or piece of painter’s masking tape. This will also help position the drop lever in the cam slot during assembly.

    RC

  4. #19

    Default Re: Clock Reassembly Tips (RE: shutterbug)

    I have a compartmented tray, similar to a silverware tray. Time wheels go into one compartment, strike wheels into another, motion work into another, levers & long stuff into another. For a 3-train I use a separate container for chime wheels & stuff.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I used to be careful about keeping them separated, each batch us-cleaned separately. After doing this for several years, I can pretty much always tell which wheel goes into which bin, just by looking at it.

    Learning through experience is A Wonderful Thing.
    Last edited by bangster; 02-06-2012 at 10:41 AM.
    1. Check out the REPAIR HINTS & HOW-TO's forum! Click Here.

  5. #20
    Registered user. moe1942's Avatar
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    Default Re: Clock Reassembly Tips (RE: R. Croswell)

    Two very good points, especially about the top plate fitting easily on the pillars.

  6. #21
    Registered user. Tony10Clocks's Avatar
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    Default Re: Clock Reassembly Tips (RE: bangster)

    Quote Originally Posted by bangster View Post
    I have a compartmented tray, similar to a silverware tray. Time wheels go into one compartment, strike wheels into another, motion work into another, levers & long stuff into another. For a 3-train I use a separate container for chime wheels & stuff.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I used to be careful about keeping them separated, each batch us-cleaned separately. After doing this for several years, I can pretty much always tell which wheel goes into which bin, just by looking at it.

    Learning through experience is A Wonderful Thing.
    And enough room on the table for a cup of tea.......
    Too many clocks and not enough time, Tony

  7. #22
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    Default Re: Clock Reassembly Tips (RE: Tony10Clocks)

    Thanks to everyone for the tips. I was able to reassemble, and adjust/tune, a Gilbert time/strike movement clock yesterday in less than one hour, certainly a record time for me. I had to also replace two bushiings, an exercise that took about 5 minutes. They are quite large on these clocks, so I drilled out the old ones and press fitted new ones in place with my peening hammer. It's all set to go back in the case. I still have a lot to learn, but am getting better at this every day, and am managing to avoid the major screw ups that I sometimes encountered when I first took up this hobby (the worst being an exploding movement that sent parts flying all around my living room). Cheers to all.

  8. #23

    Default Re: Clock Reassembly Tips (RE: hookster)

    Quote Originally Posted by hookster View Post
    .... so I drilled out the old ones and press fitted new ones in place with my peening hammer.....
    That will probably bite you in the butt some day. The smaller the pivot, the more accurate bushing placement has to be. Drilling is not a good practice. Using a drill press would be better IMHO (but not the best).

  9. #24
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    Default Re: Clock Reassembly Tips (RE: shutterbug)

    By the way, I did use a drill press, and I do agree with you that it is not the best route in any case. As you no doubt are aware, most American clocks have very large diameter pivots, and are quite forgiving. For smaller pivot holes, I have tried using a hand operated twist drill with very small drill bits, and/or broaches and go slow. I wouldn't attempt to do this repair, as a hobbyist, on a classic/expensive clock but would send it out to someone with the proper bushing equipment which, alas, I cannot really afford at this stage. In many cases, I just do this on practice movements that I pick up for a pittance at garage sales or on eBay so, if I mess things up, I chalk it up to learning . I do, however, appreciate your advice, and the expertise that you and others so kindly share on this thread.

  10. #25

    Default Re: Clock Reassembly Tips (RE: hookster)

    If you use a small file first to 'oval' the hole in the opposite direction, equal to the wear, you'll get pretty good results using your method

  11. #26

    Default Re: Clock Reassembly Tips (RE: shutterbug)

    1. Check out the REPAIR HINTS & HOW-TO's forum! Click Here.

  12. #27
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    Default Re: Clock Reassembly Tips (RE: bangster)

    Thanks Shutterbug, great reference site.

  13. #28

    Default Re: Clock Reassembly Tips (RE: hookster)

    You're welcome ..... but the reference was Bangster's

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