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  1. #1
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    Default Advice for loud tick-tock

    One of my wall clocks has a pretty loud tick-tock. In searching on this site, I came across 2 suggestions: the first one is to adjust the escape [I suppose lowering it to reduce the travel, thus lowering the sound?] and the second is to install felt washers between the movement and the back of the case.

    Since the clock is pretty accurate and has not needed any adjustment of the pendulum, I intended to go for the second option; however, this is my question: even if you have felt washers between the movement and the back of the case, isn't the ticking sound going to still be transferred through the screws to the case and the reduction be very minimal? Did anyone ever come across a different solution?

  2. #2
    Registered User gvasale's Avatar
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    Default Re: Advice for loud tick-tock (RE: supermanx1a)

    rubber grommets. You need to isolate the movement from the case and also insure the screws are also isolated from the movement. Maybe a little vinyl tubing over the screw and a resilient washer under the screw's head.

    Then if you need to, pads where the clock rests against the wall, and resilient coating on the hook.

  3. #3
    Registered User Grant Perry's Avatar
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    Default Re: Advice for loud tick-tock (RE: gvasale)

    Good advice!
    I have two real loud tickers. A Pequegnat Brandon, and a Waterbury Galesburg. The Waterbury is by far the loudest. I have seen cardboard washers installed between the movement and case, I guess that is what they were for, to dampen the sound?
    Grant

  4. #4

    Default Re: Advice for loud tick-tock (RE: Grant Perry)

    The "tick" is a direct reaction to the drop. You probably just need to set it better. Maximum lock, minimum drop gives you optimal performance and minimal noise
    But sure, the wood case will act as a sound board and magnify the sound, and dampening will help.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Advice for loud tick-tock (RE: shutterbug)

    I do not object to a loud tick. If it is bothersome, then just add a few more and it won't be so noticeable......

    Best,

    Richard T.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 003.jpg  

  6. #6
    Registered User John Prevatte's Avatar
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    Default Re: Advice for loud tick-tock (RE: Richard T.)

    I heard once that linning the inside of a Blk mantle clock with felt, used on pool tables will cut the noise considerably. I might try that, I have some that would wake the dead. Its strage to me how one can be so quite in the test stand, but when to put them back in the case they produce a sound heard over the TV set.
    God started the clock in Gen. 1:13

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Advice for loud tick-tock (RE: John Prevatte)

    If it's a recoil escapement (only!), loud ticking usually means too much drop, so what others say is the best thing to go for first. If the drop can be adjusted, it's much easier than the felt thing.

    Blk?? What sort of mantel clock is it and can the escapement be adjusted? Even the mantelpiece material can make a difference!
    Mike - banned member of the throwaway society.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Advice for loud tick-tock (RE: supermanx1a)

    shutterbug - "Maximum lock, minimum drop gives you optimal performance and minimal noise" ?? Someone actually suggested to loosen the movement from the case to reduce the sound. Could you please explain?

    gvasale - Felt washers under the screw heads + felt between movement and case. That's a great idea. I think I'll try that.

    Richard T. - Did you take the picture for your thumbnail in my den? Except I have a couple of clocks less than that. Your suggestion reminded me of my first car. It was a 1962 Chevrolet. When I complained to the used car salesman about the strange ticking noise from the engine, he said that if I kept the radio loud enough, I would not hear it.

  9. #9
    Registered User Kevin W.'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Advice for loud tick-tock (RE: supermanx1a)

    You could just send the clock to me and that would solve your problem.
    One clock at a time. Kevin West
    http://www.global-horology.com/GHMB/

  10. #10

    Default Re: Advice for loud tick-tock (RE: supermanx1a)

    Super,

    I love me some loud ticking clocks. Save yourself a lot of (most likely) disappointment and just put that irate ticker somewhere where the ticking won't disturb you. Or just get more clocks as Richard suggested. :-)

    Willie X

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Advice for loud tick-tock (RE: supermanx1a)

    Quote Originally Posted by supermanx1a View Post

    Richard T. - Did you take the picture for your thumbnail in my den? Except I have a couple of clocks less than that.
    I've got 15 in my living room/dining room alone. Fortunately they are not all on one wall...

    Your suggestion reminded me of my first car. It was a 1962 Chevrolet. When I complained to the used car salesman about the strange ticking noise from the engine, he said that if I kept the radio loud enough, I would not hear it.
    My first car was a 1963 Cadillac given to me as a jalopy hand-off from a wealthy cousin. I'll bet the ticking was that of stuck hydraulic lifters. <?> (GM prods were notorious for that.) That ticking sounded pretty soft compared to when the engine eventually threw a bearing.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Advice for loud tick-tock (RE: supermanx1a)

    Quote Originally Posted by supermanx1a View Post
    shutterbug - "Maximum lock, minimum drop gives you optimal performance and minimal noise" ??
    Basically, for the layman you understand, you move the anchor closer to the escape wheel. As close as it will go and still function. That will give you much better performance. That's probably as far as you should go at this point

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Advice for loud tick-tock (RE: shutterbug)

    Many thanks to all. I'll first try the suggestion from Shutterbug; otherwise, it'll be the felt washers.

    Thyme, I drove that Chevrolet for a few months, after which, before I scrapped it, it always sounded like those damaged planes, you see in war movies, after they have been shot and are about to crash in a ball of fire. Whenever I managed to have some speed, people in the street would put up their arms to protect their faces, fearing an explosion!!!

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Advice for loud tick-tock (RE: supermanx1a)

    Quote Originally Posted by supermanx1a View Post
    Many thanks to all. I'll first try the suggestion from Shutterbug; otherwise, it'll be the felt washers.

    Thyme, I drove that Chevrolet for a few months, after which, before I scrapped it, it always sounded like those damaged planes, you see in war movies, after they have been shot and are about to crash in a ball of fire. Whenever I managed to have some speed, people in the street would put up their arms to protect their faces, fearing an explosion!!!
    Oh, I guess your front exhaust pipe probably rotted and became disconnected. I had that happen too, actually several times. (It was common for it to happen on old Cadillacs). The car still ran OK, even though it did sound like a plane taking off while under acceleration. The noise didn't worry me too much tho, as I knew I could reconnect it and patch it up again.

  15. #15
    Registered User John Prevatte's Avatar
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    Default Re: Advice for loud tick-tock (RE: Willie X)

    mike Blk= black.

    I removed the movement on a Seth Thomas hump back last night and played with the drop and lock, by golly it is less noisy. With 67 clocks, this could take a while.

    I think taking some of that momentem out of the EW is the trick.

    Now the problem of the tinking sound from the pendulum bob bumping the gong.
    God started the clock in Gen. 1:13

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