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  1. #1

    Default Anglo American Clock

    Hi,

    I'm new to this forum, as you can tell, and only found you when researching a pendulum on my new clock.

    The clock case was made over here in the UK probably at the end of the 19th c. 1890 - 1900, by a not very prolific clock maker in Wellingborough by the name of William Arthur Colpman. The actual clock, I am guessing, is American, but not yet taken that close a look (only bought it 3 days ago). But the pendulum is an interesting one and I tracked down the Patent Number (March 1 1881) to Everrett Horton of New Haven.

    I love it, although it has quite a few issues, and would be interested in your views.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSC02099.jpg   DSC02100.jpg  

  2. #2
    Registered user. jmclaugh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Anglo American Clock (RE: mariok54)

    Hi Mario and welcome to the MB. I would call that an American shelf clock sometimes I understand also refered to as kitchen and parlour clocks. I don't have any info on the names but hopefully others will.

    My understanding of the term Anglo-American clocks is that it refers to drop dial wall clocks with British made cases and American movements which were supplied by a number of well known US makers. I'm not aware that cases for American clocks such as this one were made in the UK but I am sure someone with more knowledge on that subject than me will tell you more.
    Jonathan.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Anglo American Clock (RE: jmclaugh)

    Hi Jonathan,

    Apologies for hijacking the term Anglo-American

    I could be mistaken about the origin of the components. I obtained what I thought was the maker's name, William Colpman, who was a watchmaker over here, from the face. I assumed that he made the case and used an American movement. It is possible that it is 100% American and he just put his name on the face?

    If anyone can add to this then that would be great!

  4. #4
    Registered user. jmclaugh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Anglo American Clock (RE: mariok54)

    Quote Originally Posted by mario from the uk View Post
    Hi Jonathan,

    Apologies for hijacking the term Anglo-American

    I could be mistaken about the origin of the components. I obtained what I thought was the maker's name, William Colpman, who was a watchmaker over here, from the face. I assumed that he made the case and used an American movement. It is possible that it is 100% American and he just put his name on the face?

    If anyone can add to this then that would be great!
    Don't be Mario, it is possible it might be just that. If you post a picture of the movement our US friends can no doubt tell you lots about it. If it is US made I understand they were very fond of model names so perhaps someone may identify it.
    Jonathan.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Anglo American Clock (RE: jmclaugh)

    Mario:

    Welcome to the Message Board. Your clock is called the Dee, and it was indeed (no pun!) made by New Haven. Tran Duy Ly's book on New Haven Clocks and Watches shows it from the 1886 catalogue. It could also have been made a few years either side of that year. It is made of black (or American) walnut, which was popular in the 1880's for this general style of clock, popularly called parlor or kitchen (shelf) clocks, as Jonathan indicated. Some prefer to apply the term kitchen clock to the later pressed oak clocks, which gained popularity in the 1890's. I personally much prefer the walnuts.

    New Haven did a fair amount of overseas business in the U.K., particularly through its Jerome & Co. "subsidiary/division." Colpman seems to have been the retailer.

    This is a very nice looking clock. Enjoy.
    Last edited by Steven Thornberry; 01-28-2011 at 06:36 AM.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Anglo American Clock (RE: jmclaugh)

    Hello Steven,

    I had just finished Googling for pictures of New Haven Clocks and was beginning to think that maybe it was 100% American after all... So thank you very much for that priceless information

    It's interesting to know that it's also a little bit older than I thought. I imagine that in this case the watchmaker bought the clock and just put his name on the dial, I know that was fairly common practice.

    I have to admit that I bought it only a few days ago from an Antiques centre and haggled the price down from £85 to £60 (c $90), and did feel a little guilty afterwards!

    Again, many thanks for sharing your knowledge.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Anglo American Clock (RE: mariok54)

    Quote Originally Posted by mario from the uk View Post
    Hello Steven,

    I had just finished Googling for pictures of New Haven Clocks and was beginning to think that maybe it was 100% American after all... So thank you very much for that priceless information

    It's interesting to know that it's also a little bit older than I thought. I imagine that in this case the watchmaker bought the clock and just put his name on the dial, I know that was fairly common practice.

    I have to admit that I bought it only a few days ago from an Antiques centre and haggled the price down from £85 to £60 (c $90), and did feel a little guilty afterwards!

    Again, many thanks for sharing your knowledge.
    Don't feel guilty about the price you paid. I would easily pay that for this clock. Haggling is part of the antiquing experience, and I very often ask the seller for a better price.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Anglo American Clock (RE: Steven Thornberry)

    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Thornberry View Post
    Mario:

    Welcome to the Message Board. Your clock is called the Dee, and it was indeed (no pun!) made by New Haven. Tran Duy Ly's book on New Haven Clocks and Watches shows it from the 1886 catalogue...
    As Steven says, everything about the clock appears to be 100% American. BTW, an obvious detail that is unique to New Haven is their use of color in the door glass. It is quite possible that the label of Mr. Colpman might be either a repair label or more likely a retail label promoting his role as a merchandiser.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Anglo American Clock (RE: Thyme)

    I like your new clock very much, espcially the upper portion that reminds me of a "widows walk" on a house. The walnut gives it a rich appearance. As far as the Pendulum Bob, it looks like it's calibrated for rate change - a nice touch.

    Enjoy!

    Hal

  10. #10

    Default Re: Anglo American Clock (RE: halnwheels)

    Thank you all for those very positive comments.

    I felt a little 'guilty' because I originally saw the clock last Sunday. I made the Antique Centre an offer, they contacted the owner who came back with £60. Because the dial had seen better days I dithered. They said that the owner actually worked at the centre on Tuesdays and so I could pop in and see him then and discuss the price.
    I did call back, went to the section where the clock was, and lo and behold there was some chap inspecting it. So I hovered and hovered at a distance and thought that if he bought well then I deserved to lose it. He finally walked off so I took a closed look at the clock, and decided that it was certainly worth the money. So I scooped it up and went to one of the counters. The chap who had been looking at it was there and when he saw me his poor face dropped. He was waiting to enquire about the very same clock.
    The actual owner was behind the counter and recalled the agreed price of £60. Even before money exchanged hands the other aggrieved shopper was offering me £90 for it. I declined.
    So I felt a little guilt for 'stealing' the clock from beneath that chap's nose, and for only paying the owner £60 when the man next to me would have happily paid full price!

    On the subject of the dial... we can happily live with it, but what do others think about having it refinished?
    With my other clocks the issues have tended to be with the case, something I've always managed to tackle myself.

    Any views on that at all? Any advice would be gratefully accepted

  11. #11
    Forums Administrator harold bain's Avatar
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    Default Re: Anglo American Clock (RE: mariok54)

    Hi, Mario, and welcome to the message board.
    Nice find. We have a new member in the UK that paints and restores dials. You could contact her here:
    http://www.dialpainter.com/
    Many American clocks had paper dials that are relatively easy to replace, but yours was painted, and takes a bit more to restore. Get an estimate before making a decision on restoring it.
    harold bain, Member ch 33
    "If it won't "tick",
    let me "tock" to it"

  12. #12

    Default Re: Anglo American Clock (RE: harold bain)

    Hello Harold,

    Many thanks for that link, I'll definitely drop her an e-mail.

    This really is a great forum! Thanks all!

  13. #13
    Registered user. Chris Radano's Avatar
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    Default Re: Anglo American Clock (RE: mariok54)

    That clock is as American as Chevrolets and apple pie.

    If it were me, I would likely have the dial redone. But, it would have to be an exact reproduction. In the USA, there are people who can do this. "The Dial House" comes to mind. Maybe you could contact them. You do not need to be rushed to do this, and the numerals are still legible from what is seen in your photo.

    I Personally don't mind dials that have faded from age, or some paint flaked off. As long as it's not "too bad". And, that is purely a matter of personal preference.

    Here is a photo of a dial that I'm keeping. It is about at the limit that stays acceptable to me. Of course, the original signature has value to me.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSCN4462.jpg  

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Anglo American Clock (RE: Chris Radano)

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Radano View Post

    I Personally don't mind dials that have faded from age, or some paint flaked off. As long as it's not "too bad". And, that is purely a matter of personal preference.
    Well, personal preference aside, the dial will continue to deteriorate if it is not restored. I do dial restorations and did one identical to this (on my own New Haven Rhine model) a few years back. At the time it didn't seem to warrant using a sealant on it, so I didn't apply it. It recently began to resume flaking so I needed to retouch it and use a sealant.

    Here is a photo of a dial that I'm keeping. It is about at the limit that stays acceptable to me. Of course, the original signature has value to me.
    In this example the dial does not appear to have what I call a pre-flaking condition. It can probably be left as it is or it could be retouched, as what it would require appears to be a relatively uncomplicated restoration.

  15. #15
    Registered user. Chris Radano's Avatar
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    Default Re: Anglo American Clock (RE: Thyme)

    Thyme, I knew you would contribute to the dial restoration opinions. I seen dials you've restored here, and you do excellent work.

    The dial in my attachment, I have stabilized using my own method. I use Soluvar varnish, allow to set 3 or more days. Then, rub off the Soluvar with mineral spirits on a shop towel. Next, coat with Renaissance wax, or any good paste wax.

    Someone will probably find fault with the above, but my guess is the dial will not deteriorate for another 150 years. Especially, if kept in a climate controlled environment.

    Other dials, I may choose to apply wax only. Wax is excellent to retain a painted surface.

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