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  1. #1
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    Default Naphtha is Dead, Long Live?

    I live in Southern California and the local AQMD has outlawed Naphtha suddenly. I use an ultrasound and L&R Ammoniated Cleaner to clean clocks. I rinse off in running water, then a dip in Naphtha to remove the water and blow dry. I was thinking of using L&R Clock & Instrument Rinse or Alcohol. If I use the L&R Rinse would I need to use multiple baths to remove the cleaning solution like they use in watch repair machines. If I use alcohol to remove the water, I assume that alcohol would adsorb the water and quickly become saturated and useless. Any ideas or suggestion?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Naphtha is Dead, Long Live? (RE: Kim St.Dennis Sr.)

    Move to Texas, I can still buy it!

  3. #3
    Registered User LaBounty's Avatar
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    Default Re: Naphtha is Dead, Long Live? (RE: Kim St.Dennis Sr.)

    Hey Kim-

    I use a xylene-mineral spirits blend as a rinse for water removal. Maybe that would work as an alternative for naphtha?

    Regards,

  4. #4

    Default Re: Naphtha is Dead, Long Live? (RE: MQ32shooter)

    I use 99% Isopropyl which absorbs water. I use it multiple times, and haven't experienced it losing it's ability to absorb. Eventually it becomes a little discolored and is discarded. Naptha is Coleman camping fuel and you can probably still buy it in sports stores, Walmart, etc.

  5. #5
    Registered User gvasale's Avatar
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    Default Re: Naphtha is Dead, Long Live? (RE: shutterbug)

    Since naptha is a petroleum solvent, I don't understand why one might want to use it for removal of a largely water based cleaner. Petroleum and water don't mix very well. What I do is boil water and place all the parts in there for a few minutes then remove and air dry. It works very well, and since the parts at at 200 degrees of so, they do dry completely. And I have not had any problems with rust. Almost the same as putting them in a warm oven. Alcohol, I guess, but more expensive aside from the minimum hazards when used properly, but I'm cheap in this regard, and don't run out of clean water.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Naphtha is Dead, Long Live? (RE: gvasale)

    Quote Originally Posted by gvasale View Post
    Since naptha is a petroleum solvent, I don't understand why one might want to use it for removal of a largely water based cleaner. Petroleum and water don't mix very well.
    An undesired side effect is that it will break down the oil that's applied 'over' it too. I use it as a degreaser if I have to pre-clean really grubby movements.

  7. #7
    Registered User gvasale's Avatar
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    Default Re: Naphtha is Dead, Long Live? (RE: shutterbug)

    Shutterbug: are you saying the you wash with naptha first then go to the other cleaner (ultrasonic?) Myself, I got a new L&R to replace the old Bransonic that just crapped out, and it (L&R) does a nice job. Its one with heat too. But I'd still like to repair the Bransonic. I my experiance, the only othe thng I liked asmost as well as a good ultrasonic is the nasty carburetor soak solution that has metheleyne chloride and other nasty stuff you had to use outside.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Naphtha is Dead, Long Live? (RE: gvasale)

    Quote Originally Posted by gvasale View Post
    Shutterbug: are you saying the you wash with naptha first then go to the other cleaner (ultrasonic?)
    Not typically, but when I encounter WD-40 or other sprayed on goop, I do an initial soak to protect my cleaner. Sometimes the movement has even been liberally greased with car grease or something! I like to get that off before putting it in my US

  9. #9
    Forums Administrator harold bain's Avatar
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    Default Re: Naphtha is Dead, Long Live? (RE: shutterbug)

    I keep my old batch of cleaner when I change mine, and use it for a presoak when I run into a greasy or WD40'ed movement.
    There will be a lot of upset campers if Coleman fuel (naptha) is banned. My only use for it is cleaning balances.
    harold bain, Member ch 33
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  10. #10
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    Default Re: Naphtha is Dead, Long Live? (RE: gvasale)

    Quote Originally Posted by gvasale View Post
    Since naptha is a petroleum solvent, I don't understand why one might want to use it for removal of a largely water based cleaner. Petroleum and water don't mix very well. What I do is boil water and place all the parts in there for a few minutes then remove and air dry. It works very well, and since the parts at at 200 degrees of so, they do dry completely. And I have not had any problems with rust. Almost the same as putting them in a warm oven. Alcohol, I guess, but more expensive aside from the minimum hazards when used properly, but I'm cheap in this regard, and don't run out of clean water.
    I also don't see any advantage to using naphtha. As solvents go it is one of the less refined types of petroleum derivatives; I wouldn't be surprised if it left unwanted deposits or residue. I certainly smells noxious, not good for indoor use.

    An alternative to hot air is compressed air. Moisture can literally be blown away, providing you have an adequate supply of pressurized air available.
    -> posts merged by system <-
    Quote Originally Posted by harold bain View Post
    There will be a lot of upset campers if Coleman fuel (naptha) is banned. My only use for it is cleaning balances.
    Not really. A Coleman lantern will work just fine with unleaded gasoline. I use unleaded (white) gas in my lanterns. In fact it probably runs even better, as gasoline is more volatile than naphtha.

  11. #11
    Forums Administrator harold bain's Avatar
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    Default Re: Naphtha is Dead, Long Live? (RE: Thyme)

    Quote Originally Posted by Thyme View Post
    I also don't see any advantage to using naphtha. As solvents go it is one of the less refined types of petroleum derivatives; I wouldn't be surprised if it left unwanted deposits or residue. I certainly smells noxious, not good for indoor use.

    An alternative to hot air is compressed air. Moisture can literally be blown away, providing you have an adequate supply of pressurized air available.
    -> posts merged by system <-

    Not really. A Coleman lantern will work just fine with unleaded gasoline. I use unleaded (white) gas in my lanterns. In fact it probably runs even better, as gasoline is more volatile than naphtha.
    Which makes it more dangerous for camping use. Not every camper is careful with filling, storage, or it's use.
    harold bain, Member ch 33
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  12. #12
    Registered user. tok-tokkie's Avatar
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    Default Re: Naphtha is Dead, Long Live? (RE: harold bain)

    There is Benzene http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benzene which is now recognised as a carcinogen.
    And there is Benzine http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benzine which is naphtha.

    I worked in the rubber industry in the 60s where it was the usual solvent before its carcinogenic properties were recognised. One of my workmates got throat cancer - probably caused by benzene. We used it in our Zippo style lighters. It has a hotter flame than naphtha I believe. It has a pleasant sweet smell.

    Naphtha is lighter fuel. I am surprised it is banned. What about toluene or hexane as alternatives?

  13. #13

    Default Re: Naphtha is Dead, Long Live? (RE: tok-tokkie)

    Quite some time ago I finally switched from solvent based cleaning to water based cleaning. I no longer have the recycle problem. Not only is the water based concentrate much more reasonable, it works well, especially when heated. I rinse in hot water, shake off the excess water, compressed air dry and finally heated air dry for about 10 minutes. Never any rust.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Naphtha is Dead, Long Live? (RE: Jeff Salmon)

    Alcohol absorbs water. It removes the water from the clock parts by absorbing it. I suppose eventually, it could become so saturated that it no longer has room to absorb any more. But I've never had any around that long to find out. It evaporates first, and needs replenished.

    I've tried LaBounty's xylene/mineral spirits mix. It seems to work by driving off the water, rather than absorbing it. It works well, but I don't like it because of the xylene smell. (Sorry, Dave.) I stick with good ol' alcohol.

    bangster
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  15. #15
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    Default Re: Naphtha is Dead, Long Live? (RE: harold bain)

    Quote Originally Posted by harold bain View Post
    Which makes it more dangerous for camping use. Not every camper is careful with filling, storage, or it's use.
    Naphtha is less volatile than gasoline, but both are highly flammable. One doesn't require any more precaution than the other. Filling up a lantern is no more hazardous than filling a gas lawnmower. But to the idiots, virtually nothing is totally idiot-proof.

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