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  1. #1

    Default Another Gustav Becker clock to catalogue

    Pictures of my fifth complete GB and three movements.

    John, for future post I wish to know if you are interested only on complete clocks or also on movements .
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Becker DR 05a.JPG   Becker DR 05b.JPG   Becker DR 05c.JPG   Becker DR 06.JPG   Becker DR 07.JPG  

    Becker DR 08.JPG  

  2. #2
    Principal Administrator John Hubby's Avatar
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    Default Re: Another Gustav Becker clock to catalogue (RE: DieteR)

    Quote Originally Posted by DieteR View Post
    Pictures of my fifth complete GB and three movements.

    John, for future post I wish to know if you are interested only on complete clocks or also on movements .
    Dieter, thanks for posting these clocks. I am interested also in just movements as the information from them (such as the one you posted with no logos) helps tell the whole story of what GB did in manufacturing all the different models of their clocks.

    The fifth clock:
    Plate 1199, serial number 2165639
    • This one was made in second half 1910 and features the upper suspension bracket No. 7 that was introduced in 1909 as I mentioned earlier. Actually I think this clock has Plate 1207A based on the click layout, inspection holes, and suspension guard. It appears the decoration sometimes found on the front plate was not supplied with this clock even though the mounting holes are present. This is not at all unusual, it seems that decoration was an optional extra. I am curious about the finials on the support posts, I've not see those before on a Becker. Were they with the clock when you got it?

      Also, I would appreciate if you could indicate if the disc pendulums have serial numbers scribed on the bottom of the disc, even if they don't match the number on the movement. I have been able to match up some loose pendulums with their original clock by recording these numbers.

    The first movement:
    Unknown Plate, serial number 2374128
    • This is one of approximately 400 that were made in 1920, evidently for sale to a third party. It appears from the characteristics of the clocks found with this movement series that they were sold to Andreas Huber, as there were about 100 more made in 1922 and then another 100 made in 1923 but this time stamped with the "Huber Uhren" logo. I have classified this back plate as "Plate 1634+", being identical to Plate 1634 but with a serial number added. The ones with the Huber Uhren logo (serial numbers in the range 2441400 to 2441500) I have designated as "Plate 1634++".

    The second movement:
    Plate 1207B, serial number 2442605
    • Based on the serial number this movement was made in first half 1923. You have shown Plate 1207B; it is actually Plate 1207A. The drawing in the Repair Guide as Plate 1207B shows there is no eccentric; however the actual clock from which this plate was drawn was sold in Terwilliger's Silent Auction No. 26 Lot no. 57 and does have an eccentric in the back plate. It also was advertised as having Plate 1207A in the auction. I have inspected the actual clock and there is no physical difference between Plate 1207A and 1207B other than the drawing error so I have eliminated this plate from being recorded in any of my data. Also for information, the serial number shown on Plate 1207A in the Repair Guide is missing a final "0", I have seen the actual clock and found 2395510 to be the number.

    The third movement:
    Plate 1207B, serial number 2267252
    • This movement was made in early 1913 based on the serial number. Here again, I am classifying this one as Plate 1207A for the reasons explained for the second movement. I note that the upper suspension bracket appears to be a Becker No. 5. Although this may be a Becker part, my opinion is that it is a replacement for the original that would have been bracket No. 7. As noted in my response for your first four clocks, the No. 7 bracket was introduced in 1909 and then used exclusively from late 1909 until the introduction of bracket No. 8 in March 1913. From that time until the end of 1915, both No. 7 and No. 8 were found in about equal numbers, but after 1915 the No. 7 was no longer used. Bracket No. 5 evidently was not used on Becker clocks after 1909.

    Once again thanks for posting these photos, each one has added some knowledge to our database for GB 400-Day clocks.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Another Gustav Becker clock to catalogue (RE: John Hubby)

    John, it looks to me that the base and pillars of The fifth Clock, are the same as the base and pillars on clock No.3 in DieteR's first set of clocks.





    Ivan.

  4. #4
    Principal Administrator John Hubby's Avatar
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    Default Re: Another Gustav Becker clock to catalogue (RE: ivancooke)

    Quote Originally Posted by ivancooke View Post
    John, it looks to me that the base and pillars of The fifth Clock, are the same as the base and pillars on clock No.3 in DieteR's first set of clocks.
    Ivan.
    Ivan, you are quite correct. Not only that, after digging into my archives I find there are several column finials including this one that somehow had not caught my attention in all these years of looking at a few thousand GB clocks. Amazing what you don't see when you think you're looking at every single detail!! Now I need to add another item to my "what's different?" list and record what was used and when for these clocks. In a very quick review I found five different pillar finials used for GB 400-Day clocks, generally applying to certain types of clocks and also to certain time periods. I'll post something on that after I've had time to go through my archives in detail.

    In the instance of the finial for Dieter's fifth clock, I might conclude that this is actually a marriage of a base and pillars from what originally had been one of the Shield or large dial models, now with a standard movement having a regular size dial. To see what I mean, just compare this clock with Dieter's third clock in the other thread. As far as I recall (need to confirm by archive search) the only GB clocks to use the wide stance pillars placed about the center of the base were those with a shield dial or large diameter round dial. The smaller dial versions all have the pillars quite closer together near the front of the base.

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