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  1. #16

    Default Re: Rebuilding a ww lathe (RE: bkerr)

    Quote Originally Posted by bkerr View Post
    I'd like to get it replated.
    Good Day, bkerr!

    It would be a mistake to attempt re-plating, either yourself or have it done by professional.

    Do your best to clean it up, to prevent farther rust, and if needed, use your money to get the lathe to function properly. Chrome plating was to make lathe look shiny aiming only to impress customers when they come to shop.

    If You feel how You must do something then paint it as already suggested. Use primer to correct the unevenness of surface and then use hammertone paint of your liking. Some of the best watchmaker's lathes were painted, G. Boley, La Favorite, Levin, Lorch Schmidt as well as many other.

    Cheers

    Dushan
    >> Experience is the name everyone gives to their mistakes. << - Oscar Wilde (1854 - 1900)

  2. #17
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a ww lathe (RE: Dushan Grujich)

    I think if it were me, I might consider having it powder coated. The places that do that work can mask all mating surfaces so that they will not be affected, and powder coating will withstand a lot more abuse than any kind of paint.

  3. #18

    Default Re: Rebuilding a ww lathe (RE: Dave B)

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave B View Post
    I think if it were me, I might consider having it powder coated.
    This is another, very good suggestion!

    Cheers

    Dushan
    >> Experience is the name everyone gives to their mistakes. << - Oscar Wilde (1854 - 1900)

  4. #19
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a ww lathe (RE: Dave B)

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave B View Post
    I think if it were me, I might consider having it powder coated. The places that do that work can mask all mating surfaces so that they will not be affected, and powder coating will withstand a lot more abuse than any kind of paint.
    Powder coating will be tougher than paint and can be done at home. I document my home shop powder coating setup here:

    http://www.jamesriser.com/Machinery/PowderCoating/Testing.html

    If you do go this route, you might want to preheat the metal and blow on powder while parts are hot.
    Jim

  5. #20
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a ww lathe (RE: motormaker)

    Quote Originally Posted by motormaker View Post
    Powder coating will be tougher than paint and can be done at home. I document my home shop powder coating setup here:

    http://www.jamesriser.com/Machinery/PowderCoating/Testing.html

    If you do go this route, you might want to preheat the metal and blow on powder while parts are hot.
    Jim
    Now that's pretty impressive. I didn't know Sears carried a powder coating kit. Thanks for the tip...
    Doug Haeussler, NAWCC #0167553 - Prescott Valley, AZ

  6. #21
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a ww lathe (RE: cazboy)

    Nickel replating the headstock, tailstock, and tool test for a ww lathe is not that difficult to do yourself, if you already have the essential equipment: electroplating rectifier, plating solution, pyrex beakers, nickel anode and clips/wire for connections.

    As someone else said, the first thing you need to do is make sure that the head and tailstock ways sit precisely in the lathe bed and that they meet exactly on center with no run-out when brought together. This assures that the "bones" of your lathe are good and true before you replate. If they are not true there is no point in going further, as you'll just be applying lipstick to a pig. Fixing such pigs is not a DIY for the non-machinist.

    Remove all the corrosion/pitting and old plating from the head-tailistock and tool rest jig, but be gentle cleaning the bed-mating surfaces, as you don't want to mess these up. You need to clean and polish the exposed surfaces to accept the nickel plating. Use an ultrasonic to remove the oils and other residues after polishing.

    It is important to protect the bedding and internal surfaces, as you don't want to plate these. You can paint them with a masking lacquer and block off the internal parts with glazing putty or Rodico.

    Then you hang your parts to be plated and your nickel anode in the electroplating bath and hook everything to your rectifier, using the correct voltage and current settings.

    After you're done plating, remove the masking material, clean, dry, buff, and lubricate the parts. Then make sure you take care of everything, unlike the previous owner, so your lathe doesn't get corroded again.

    Of course you could apply crinkle paint and powder coatings, but a nice nikel replate looks great, is quite wear resistant, and looks "original."

  7. #22

    Default Re: Rebuilding a ww lathe (RE: Neuron)

    I would be leary of stripping anything off a the bed of a toolmakers or watchmakers lathe. The fit between the headstock and tailstock is an exact one where the taper lands and the flat surface all contact at once. I don't know the thickness of the plating that is on the typical watchmakers lathe, but I am sure it's not just a tenth or two. It any of it is off, things will not line up, and will be loose

    Has anyone striped one and gotten away with it?

    Dave

  8. #23
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a ww lathe (RE: mcandrew1894)

    Quote Originally Posted by mcandrew1894 View Post
    I would be leary of stripping anything off a the bed of a toolmakers or watchmakers lathe...
    Has anyone striped one and gotten away with it?
    Dave
    I've cleaned up a few ww style lathes and replated the head and tailstocks with good results. But these lathes were good to begin with, i.e., their beds and ways were within specs and just tarnished a bit. The replating was just for the appearance of the exposed stock and tool rest surfaces. Grinding down a lathe bed or the "ways" is not an amateur DIY job. It can be done if you are a competent machinist, but you WILL change th lathe geometry. At the best, your head/tailstock will work on your remachined bed, but you'll have a problem when you try to use the parts on another bed.

    Nick

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