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Results 91 to 104 of 104
  1. #91

    Default Re: Early 19 century long case clock (RE: FredWJensen)

    Before you exchange your weights I suggest that you try this: Let the clock run over night with the 7 lbs weights and the extra weight added. On the next day, without stopping the clock, remove the extra weight and see if the clock continues to run. If yes, you are fine, if not, go for the heavier weights.

    I often experienced with Black Forest clocks (I had 7 of them) that after a repair or a move to a different place the clocks initially needed more weight to run. I believe this is due to the fact that the wooden frame is not as stable as a metal one and may shift somewhat and then needs some time to settle back into the "best" position. Once this position is found, the clock can continue to run on less weight.

    Uhralt

  2. #92

    Smile Re: Early 19 century long case clock (RE: Uhralt)

    Great. I very much appreciate your help.

  3. #93

    Smile Re: Early 19 century long case clock (RE: FredWJensen)

    I woke up this morning to find the clock stopped. Needless to say, I didn't take the extra weight off. I purchased a set of 10 lb weights. The clock is running better with the 10 lb weight. I hope that extra weight won't sink to the center of the earth. Who knows what they originally had on there.
    Another entry into this thread was using the pulleys? And the weight he has look larger than the 7 lbs. The look even larger than the 10 lbs I have, but who knows. I rather it works even with the excessive weight than not to run and sit there idle. Like what you said, These wooden frame movements are kind of finicky. All the wheels are loose but there are NO oval shaped bushings and nothing is binding so it is hard to see where the problem is.
    I even have used that Nanoil, which I have had great success in more traditional metal movements!

    Thanks again for all your time and help. At least we got it running.

    Maybe that is why this clock was so cheap unlike the metal movement tall case clocks. I guess there are no bargains out there only fool that think they are getting a bargain. Well, I didn;t buy it because it was cheap, I just wanted a Tall Case clock from the 18 or 19 century. I got what I wanted.

  4. #94

    Cool Re: Early 19 century long case clock (RE: FredWJensen)

    It is running fine. How is the pendulum adjusted? The pendulum Bob is really on tight.

  5. #95

    Default Re: Early 19 century long case clock (RE: FredWJensen)

    Quote Originally Posted by FredWJensen View Post
    It is running fine. How is the pendulum adjusted? The pendulum Bob is really on tight.
    You should have a rating nut under the bob. It may be rusted tight. Look for threads, try some penetrating oil and let it 'soak' overnight.

  6. #96

    Thumbs down Re: Early 19 century long case clock (RE: shutterbug)

    There is no nut. Unless it fell off years ago. Maybe this bob unscrews along the threaded rod?? It is held very firmly in place. It could be threaded and frozen.

  7. #97

    Default Re: Early 19 century long case clock (RE: FredWJensen)

    First of all, congratualtions that you got the clock finally running. Don't be sorry about the movement, these Black Forest movements usually are reliable timekeepers once the decided to run and I like them!

    There is no rating nut under the pendulum. You just rotate the bob around the threaded rod and it will screw upward clockwise and downward counter-clockwise. This means that you can only move it up or down for a full turn. Fine adjustment is not possible this way. Maybe that is another cause why sometimes pieces of wood or metal were stuck behind the bob (upper end to make it run faster, lower end to make it run slower.

    You have got a great looking old Grandfather clock and will be happy once it is fully running and adjusted!

    Uhralt

  8. #98

    Smile Re: Early 19 century long case clock (RE: Uhralt)

    Thanks for all your help. I counldn't have done it without you. It seems to be running strong. Maybe in a week or so I will reattach the pulley to see if it will run with half the weight? In the mean time, I guess the worst thing that can happen is that the winding wheel bushing will get worn, I have plenty of Nano oil in there to lubricate them and for the present I enjoy seeing the clock run. Thanks again.

  9. #99

    Default Re: Early 19 century long case clock (RE: FredWJensen)

    Enjoy your clock!I guess that you will need more weightto run it with the pulleys (like 15 lbs) but it doesn't hurt to try.Tell us whatyou find!

    Uhralt

  10. #100

    Default Re: Early 19 century long case clock (RE: Uhralt)

    PS: I don't think that running on 10 lbs will hurt your clock.

  11. #101

    Default Re: Early 19 century long case clock (RE: Uhralt)

    Clock is running with vigor, but I have one problem. The strike count is rising slowly. After 2 days it begins striking 2 at 1 and so on. I have reset the count several times, once by removing the hands and setting them to the count. The next time by advancing the count. Still with time a day or two the count begin adding a strike. Any suggestions?

  12. #102

    Default Re: Early 19 century long case clock (RE: FredWJensen)

    Quote Originally Posted by FredWJensen View Post
    Clock is running with vigor, but I have one problem. The strike count is rising slowly. After 2 days it begins striking 2 at 1 and so on. I have reset the count several times, once by removing the hands and setting them to the count. The next time by advancing the count. Still with time a day or two the count begin adding a strike. Any suggestions?
    Good to hear that the clock is running. Did you try if it would run on less weight now?

    It seems that at some point in time the strike is not stopped properly and the clock strikes the next hour in addition to the correct one. The first thing I wou,ld try is to take a close look at the countwheel. Does the lever fall exactly in the middle of the openingsand does this happen at all hours? It might be necessary to remove the countwheel and put it back on maybe one tooth moved back or forward. If this doesn't solve the problem check if the wheel carrying the pin to stop the strike catches the stop lever reliably. If not, it might be necessary to set this wheel one tooth forward or back.

    Good luck,

    Uhralt

  13. #103

    Default Re: Early 19 century long case clock (RE: Uhralt)

    Quote Originally Posted by uhralt View Post
    Good to hear that the clock is running. Did you try if it would run on less weight now?

    It seems that at some point in time the strike is not stopped properly and the clock strikes the next hour in addition to the correct one. The first thing I wou,ld try is to take a close look at the countwheel. Does the lever fall exactly in the middle of the openingsand does this happen at all hours? It might be necessary to remove the countwheel and put it back on maybe one tooth moved back or forward. If this doesn't solve the problem check if the wheel carrying the pin to stop the strike catches the stop lever reliably. If not, it might be necessary to set this wheel one tooth forward or back.

    Good luck,

    Uhralt
    One more thing to check: On the picture on post # 47 I see that there is a helper spring pushing the count lever downwards. If the helper spring has too little tension, the lever may miss to fall into the open spaces of the count wheel from time to time. I would check the tension and bend the spring a little to increase tension if needed.

    Uhralt

  14. #104
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    Default Re: Early 19 century long case clock (RE: Uhralt)

    That is almost certainly a German Black forest movement. The case may very likely have been made in this country, though, particularly if it is made of Walnut. DO NOT USE METAL CABLES ON THIS MOVEMENT! They will chew up the wood drums. I don't particularly like gut, and usually restring these with either braided nylon, or synthetic cables. (The biggest complaint I have with synthetic cables is they are usually furnished in bright primary colors, which I find astheticaly displeasing.) Weights on these Black Forest clocks are relatively heavy. I have seen them with weights as high as fifteen pounds. About twelve to thirteen seems to be about the norm. On both the thirty hour and the eight day ones I have encountered, the time and strike were furnished with the same weight; they were interchangeable.

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