Month's Goal: $300, Received: $350.00 - (117%) Contribute Now
Donate whatever you can or Join the 15,000 other NAWCC members for only $72 (plus $10 for hard copy publications). Check it out here.


NOTICE Notice: This is an old thread. The last post was 1501 days ago. If your post is not directly related to this discussion please consider making a new thread.
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Registered user. web-collage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Southwest Colorado
    Posts
    14

    Default Carriage clock by Charles Frodsham London

    I just purchased a carriage clock made by Charles Frodsham, London. Pictures attached. I would like to polish the brass work -- carefully -- but without taking the clock apart. A local jeweler can clean and oil the works if needed but there isn't anyone listed as a horology restorer within 200 miles of here (SW Colorado). Any advice? Also, any clue as to age of the clock?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails charles frodsham oval.jpg   plaque.jpg   top5.jpg  

  2. #2
    Registered user. Kevin W.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Nepean, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    16,756
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Carriage clock by Charles Frodsham London (RE: web-collage)

    Nice looking clock.Many here might polish this case , while some would not.That,s a big discussion in itself.I hope who ever you get to clean and oil the movement, takes it apart and does a proper job, it,s a nice looking clock and a shame to damage it by running a dirty movement.
    I my self would not polish this case and don,t recommend doing it without taking the case apart.
    Last edited by Kevin W.; 03-08-2010 at 09:47 AM. Reason: added more
    One clock at a time. Kevin West
    http://www.global-horology.com/GHMB/

  3. #3
    Registered user. web-collage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Southwest Colorado
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Carriage clock by Charles Frodsham London (RE: Kevin W.)

    If it had a uniform patina from age I would leave it as is but the brass is sort of spotty looking. Hard to resist cleaning it a bit.

  4. #4
    Registered user. Kevin W.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Nepean, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    16,756
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Carriage clock by Charles Frodsham London (RE: web-collage)

    I believe it has a lacquer over the brass which is what you call spotty.It,s from age.I like to keep a clock looking old but not bad looking.If you polish without taking the case apart you won,t be able to get into the cracks and crevices of the case, in my opinion it would look worse with polish and crud and in these areas not cleaned out.
    But it,s your clock so you can do as you please.
    Last edited by Kevin W.; 03-08-2010 at 10:46 AM. Reason: added more
    One clock at a time. Kevin West
    http://www.global-horology.com/GHMB/

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    California
    Posts
    98

    Default Re: Carriage clock by Charles Frodsham London (RE: Kevin W.)

    An email to Charles Frodsham & Company in London with your pictures and a query about its age would probably get you a pretty accurate answer. Based on the style of signature, I suspect this clock is relatively modern. Let us know if you find out anything more.

    Tom Wotruba

  6. #6
    Registered user. web-collage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Southwest Colorado
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Carriage clock by Charles Frodsham London (RE: Tom Wotruba)

    Haha I wrote to Frodsham in London asking what sort of polish they would recommend and they told me to have the entire thing taken apart and re-laquered. I'll send them another picture and ask about age. Do they mind being asked questions?

    The jeweler who can clean and repair clocks and wind up watches knows enough for that but I don't think he's into restoration or re-laquering the case.

    DL
    Last edited by web-collage; 03-08-2010 at 02:55 PM.

  7. #7
    Registered user. Kevin W.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Nepean, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    16,756
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Carriage clock by Charles Frodsham London (RE: web-collage)

    Quote Originally Posted by web-collage View Post
    Haha I wrote to Frodsham in London asking what sort of polish they would recommend and they told me to have the entire thing taken apart and re-laquered. I'll send them another picture and ask about age. Do they mind being asked questions?

    The jeweler who can clean and repair clocks and wind up watches knows enough for that but I don't think he's into restoration or re-laquering the case.

    DL
    Web you asked a question and i simply gave my opinion.
    They did say take it apart to do a good job of it.The old lacquer will have to be striped off, what there is left of it.There are threads on this subject if you do a search on it.
    Last edited by Kevin W.; 03-09-2010 at 12:40 AM. Reason: added more
    One clock at a time. Kevin West
    http://www.global-horology.com/GHMB/

  8. #8
    Registered user. jmclaugh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oxford
    Posts
    2,595

    Default Re: Carriage clock by Charles Frodsham London (RE: Kevin W.)

    Well worth getting the case cleaning and re-lacquered and best to do it at the same time as servicing the movement. In the meantime a quick polish would do no harm and improve its appearance.
    Jonathan.

  9. #9
    Registered user. web-collage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Southwest Colorado
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Carriage clock by Charles Frodsham London (RE: jmclaugh)

    I will talk with the jeweler who is doing the cleaning on my first simple carriage clock and see if he does re-laquering. He might know someone who does but pretty certainly not in this area (very small town). I know he takes everything apart to do the cleaning. I would like to see how he does with the first clock before entrusting another to him.

    All advice is appreciated. I will keep looking for the Allix book. How did I transform from someone who just wanted a nice carriage clock to a collector?

    DL

  10. #10
    Registered user. Kevin W.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Nepean, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    16,756
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Carriage clock by Charles Frodsham London (RE: web-collage)

    Trust me, it, s easy to catch the clock bug.
    One clock at a time. Kevin West
    http://www.global-horology.com/GHMB/

  11. #11
    Registered user. web-collage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Southwest Colorado
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Carriage clock by Charles Frodsham London (RE: Kevin W.)

    I found the Allix book on Carriage Clocks in Canada through Alibris and used a coupon to bring price and shipping to a reasonable level. I think perhaps I have been lucky in my first purchases but more information may lead to a broader collection. New clocks are nice, but there is something about a clock that has been used and looked at for many years ...

    DL

  12. #12
    Registered user. web-collage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Southwest Colorado
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Carriage clock by Charles Frodsham London (RE: web-collage)

    The Frodsham clock arrived today, shipped from Florida. The jeweler (who is holding my other English clock hostage for cleaning) looked it over and said the inside was perfectly clean. Key from the other clock fit. Polished the case with a soft cloth. Oval beveled glass is all perfect and I agree with whoever told me not to try cleaning the brass. It looks fine. Clock has a loud rapid tick. It is sitting on a glass table and totally outclasses the battery-run Howard Miller aniversary clock next to it. Keeping perfect time. Yes I just sat and watched it for two hours.

    Frodsham in London wrote:
    Yes, the clock was made in the early 1980's. The case, dial and movement were made in Frodshams workshops and fitted it with a Swiss 11-jewel platform lever escapement. The 'Oval' timepiece was available in 2 sizes; Miniature 11.5cm high, and Standard at 15cm high. Both models sold for approx £200 (US$ 300) at the time, depending on who was retailing the piece, the firm or franchisee.

    DL

Similar Threads

  1. Charles Frodsham Paris Clock - help dating, please.
    By Mairi in forum Clocks General.
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 11-17-2012, 11:52 PM
  2. Mantel clocks by Eardley Norton, London
    By Oled in forum Clocks General.
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-08-2010, 01:48 PM
  3. SUPER GIANT CARRIAGE CLOCK BY L'EPEE: WHERE IS IT NOW?
    By Jeff Salmon in forum Clocks General.
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-13-2009, 04:30 PM
  4. MINIATURE CARRIAGE CLOCK - By Marenzeller
    By harold in forum Clocks General.
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 05-19-2008, 07:57 PM
  5. Is this carriage clock by L.Leroy?
    By ArchieH in forum Clocks General.
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 01-05-2007, 08:25 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •