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  1. #16
    Registered user. Sooth's Avatar
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    Default Re: Post your favorite American fusee clock. (RE: rmarkowitz1_cee4a1)

    The best I can do is provide photos of two Fusee movements that I have. I don't yet own an actually complete clock with a fusee.

    This movement is not a true fusee (as the experts will know). It's by Chauncey Boardman, and the springs (though original and repaired) need to be changed. This poor movement was in sad shape. The verge had a terrible repair (quality wise) done with some type of glue or epoxy, also the seatboard was broken in 2-3 places, and the line that was on it was pieced together from three different cord materials.

    I believe this was originally in either a miniature ogee or a steeple clock.

    As received:




    After repairs:




    Then I have a typical English fusee movement. Nothing too exciting, needs a pendulum for it.


  2. #17

    Default Re: Post your favorite American fusee clock. (RE: Sooth)

    Greetings all.

    Have posted another American fusee clock (lots more where that came from).

    Clock is labelled by George Bauman, Columbus Ohio. Miniature Empire case with gilt 1/4 columns with cyma recta cornice. Only 15 1/2 inches tall. Not much out there about this particular "maker" (ie, probably purchased movements and components, made cases, read on).

    Movement is a pretty standard 8 day Jerome detached fusee. Fusees are mounted in a cast iron frame directly below the movement. These movements are well documented in Bailey's Rags to Riches to Rags. Jerome "work horse" fusee movement.

    Case is most definately NOT typical CT product. Not veneered, but made of solid hardwood. Not sure if walnut or mahogany. Thick back board. However, dial, tablet, which are original, look like pretty standard CT products. I believe the case to be locally made.

    Condition is quite nice, with original finish. Some flaking to glass in the white of the building. Typical. Hands are replaced, since re-replaced with more appropriate ones. Gong base has been shifted. Prior to purchase, diassembled clock (you should have seen the look on the dealers face as I did this) including gong. All shadows and screw holes lline up perfectly. Suspect screw holes stripped out, leading to shifting of gong base.

    Case style reminiscent of some Jerome products. Have very similar minature Manross Empire clock as well.

    Not much out there about this particular "maker". See Gibbs, Buckeye Horology:A Review of Ohio Clock and Watch Makers, page page 7, photos 6 and 7. Also see NAWCC Bulletin, #268, pages 100-2. The latter clock is without a label and unattributed. It is mentioned that the movement is stamped "New Haven", without further details.

    This is the very clock sold as part of the dispersal of the Sposato Collection by the now defunct Bourne's Auction Gallery (10/29/85, lot 22, described by Peter Sawyer as "extremely rare shelf clock" with condition reported as "extremely fine and original"). Cowan's dispersed Paul Heffner's collection (12/14/03) which included much wonderful Ohio stuff. Without a single clock by this maker. Have to assume then not a common one.

    Please post any additional info you might have.

    Stay tuned. More American fusee stuff to come.

    C'mon folks, post your goodies too!! Shyness is NOT a virtue here.

    RM
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_1828.JPG   IMG_1826.JPG   IMG_1830.JPG  

  3. #18

    Default Re: Post your favorite American fusee clock. (RE: rmarkowitz1_cee4a1)

    Boardman & Wells came out with their original patent in 1847 for an attached fusee. Their movements are identified by having brass legs riveted to the bottom of the movement as identified in Sooth's photo. From 1847 to 1851, several firms began offering fusees with a cast iron fixture attached to the base of their existing movements as this clock exhibits. Though Frost is not listed as a Fusee movement clock maker, this clock with his label looks as though it has a Smith & Goodrich movement.

    Elias Ingraham developed this style case around 1847 as well. It is called a four column steeple.

    D
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails J Frost 4 steeple Fusee_edited-1.jpg   J Frost fusee mvt.jpg  

  4. #19

    Default Re: Post your favorite American fusee clock. (RE: DBPhelps)

    Here is another example of Elisha Manross's Double Steeple with an 8 day fusee movement. Movement is not stamped but uses the strap brass style similar to John Birge's movement. Again, Manross used the case iron assembly to prevent infringing on Boardman & Wells patent.

    D
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Elisha Manross Double Steeple.jpg   Elisha Manross Fusee Mvt.jpg  

  5. #20
    Registered user. Sooth's Avatar
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    Default Re: Post your favorite American fusee clock. (RE: DBPhelps)

    D,

    I was at first going to say that the stap movement was indeed a Birge and Fuller one, but it does have several small differences. The wheel layout is the same, but the wheels themselves aren't the same. For example, the strike wheel with the hammer lifting pins (on my B&F) has the stamped rib on the outside edge near the teeth, while yours is the opposite. Also, your time side (and I'll also assume strike side as well) mainwheel is plain, whereas mine is wider and ribbed.

    It's still safe to say, however, that it's an Ives movement (as is the case with Birge clocks).

  6. #21

    Default Re: Post your favorite American fusee clock. (RE: Sooth)

    JC, thanks for your observations. I have been trying to compare the movement in my Manross to the one in Jim DuBois' post. His clock has the remote fuzee as opposed to the one in mine, which has a cast iron assembly. The movements look very similar but since they are from different angles, its hard to say with 100% certainty. The time side wheels are not ribbed as you noted.

    Reference material indicate that Manross bought Joseph Ives clock shop in 1812. After Ives financial problems in 1830, John Birge & Ives started making clocks using Ives' strap brass method from 1832-1833. After some various partnerships, Manross started making clocks under his own label in 1843-1849. Based on the cast iron fusee assembly, one could date this double steeple around 1848. With John Birge producing clocks with Fuller around this same period, one might assume that Manross either traded with Birge or made the same type of strap brass movement, as least for this type of clock.

    JC, again thanks for your observations, it made me want to dig a little deeper.

    D

  7. #22

    Default Re: Post your favorite American fusee clock. (RE: DBPhelps)

    CS Sperry (Corydon S.) only produced clocks from 1848-1851. This little OG has an unmarked movement with a wooden dial. Sperry was the son-in-law of Mark Leavenworth.

    D
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails CS Sperry OG w Fusee Mvt.jpg   CS Sperry Fusee Mvt.jpg  

  8. #23

    Default Re: Post your favorite American fusee clock. (RE: DBPhelps)

    Nice clocks everyone and interesting info!

    Neat movement in the little C.S. Sperry. 4 spoked unribbed wheels.

    RM

  9. #24
    Registered user. Sooth's Avatar
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    Default Re: Post your favorite American fusee clock. (RE: rmarkowitz1_cee4a1)

    Regarding the Ives strap movement, I was under the impression that Birge obtained the rights to use these in his clocks through an agreement with Ives. I have this info somewhere, but it may be on a backup CD at the moment. It might also be in one of my books. In either case, the movements are nearly identical. One feature that I do note is the third wheel that is right on the inner left edge of the plate. This was changed later on (in Birge and Peck clocks) with the addition of two wheel teeth on the third wheel. This means that the wheel on later movements (perhaps after 1849 or so) the wheel is closer to the centre of the plate.

    I don`t know exactly when the change was made, because when Fuller died, some of the Birge and Peck clocks (the earlier ones) retained a wooden dial, and the same movement. Later in the partnership, the movement was changed, and the dial was made from painted zinc sheet. Another difference was in the case column capitals, which are more plain on the Peck clocks.

    All this to say, your movement is Ives style, and made prior to 1848-1849. Did Manross make his own movements? If so, it's possible that he used the same plans/dimensions for the same movement, but made his own slight modifications, to set them apart from other Ives movements. If I recall correctly, I believe Manross did make his own movements. His stamped name appears on this clock's movement in my collection:
    http://www.angelfire.com/me5/clockman/gilbertoct.html

    As for the little CS Sperry, the dates given are very close to what I would date it to (between 1845-1850) it has a decal tablet, but a wood dial, so it's right around the time that decal tablets were starting to become widely used, and right around the decline in the use of wooden dials. It's a very nice example of a mini ogee with fusee movement.

  10. #25

    Default Re: Post your favorite American fusee clock. (RE: Sooth)

    Thanks to Sooth for his welcomed comments and observations.

    Manross did make movements. Regarding Sooth's other points and observations, I just don't have the information at my finger tips to respond with the care and thoughtfulness they merit. I'm sure there are other Message Boarders who can.

    Thought I would post some additional fusee ogees.

    The first is a 3/4 size (23 inch) with a detached fusee in wood frame 8 day brass time and strike movement by John Birge. Note the business card of the multitalented T.W. Capen. The Capens were 17th century settlers of Dorchester, MA. Fuller died in 1848. Birge continued making the same clocks under his own name. If I remember correctly, this clock has an 1850 or 1851 purchase date pencilled in. See the NAWCC Bulletin, #292, pages 657-8.

    The next is a miniature ogee (18 3/4 inches tall) with a fusee in cast iron frame 30 hour brass time and strike movement by Smith and Goodrich. I particularly like the patriotic monochromatic glass. The center of the tablet depicts a spread winged rather fierce bald eagle with a star and bar shield clutching a ribbon in its beak inscribed "E Pluribus Unim". The vignettes surrounding the central field celebrate the nation's natural bounty (a hunter aiming his rifle at birds in flight), industry (a steam engine with telegraph wires on poles beside the tracks, another with a factory with smoke pouring from a stack), and maritime pursuits (a sailing vessel).

    Finally, not quite an ogee, but a miniature (just under 15 inches) fusee shelf clock with ogee mouldings with the same movement as above and a Fenn patriotic glass. Note how I managed to snap off the end of the original hour hand. The piece has been sitting in the bottom of the clock awaiting repair...for about 10 years. Pasted to the inside bottom of the clock is a hand written note stating "My mother's father's clock/Samuel L. Gamby".

    RM
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_1865.JPG   IMG_1862.JPG   IMG_1864.JPG   IMG_1861.JPG   IMG_1863.JPG  

    IMG_1867.JPG   IMG_1868.JPG   IMG_1871.JPG   IMG_1874.JPG   IMG_1875.JPG  


  11. #26

    Default Re: Post your favorite American fusee clock. (RE: rmarkowitz1_cee4a1)

    American fusee wall clocks and timepieces were also produced.

    Attached are examples of 2 Jerome wall timepieces with integral fusee 8 day brass movements. They were made as clocks as well. Look like English "dial" clocks. See Bailey's Rags to Riches to Rags:The Story of Chauncey Jerome, pages 83-85 for more details.

    RM
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_1546.JPG   IMG_1548.JPG   IMG_1714.JPG   IMG_1833.JPG   IMG_1836.JPG  


  12. #27
    Registered User Jerome collector's Avatar
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    Default Re: Post your favorite American fusee clock. (RE: rmarkowitz1_cee4a1)

    Adding to the discussions about Manross and Birge, I found the following in my references:

    In Forestville Clockmakers by Roberts and Taylor, it says:

    "By the second half of the 1840's, spring clocks were becoming increasingly popular. Elisha Manross produced an 8-d. strap movement, driven by fusees, rather similar to the simplified weight-driven strap movements made by Birge & Fuller and Birge, Peck & Co. Manross placed this movement in sharp-Gothic-on-frame cases."

    I take this as confirmation that Manross did, in fact, make his own movements.

    Roberts' The Contributions of Joseph Ives to Connecticut Clock Technology 1810-1862 contains much information regarding the relationship between Birge and Ives (starting on page 126). It appears that Birge had license from Ives to produce the rolling-pinion movement and was also committed to protecting Ives from infringement of the patent. Manross was not a party to these agreements. Does the Manross movement have rolling pinions, or is the similarity primarily the use of brass straps to make the plates?

    Mike

  13. #28

    Default Re: Post your favorite American fusee clock. (RE: Jerome collector)

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerome collector View Post
    Adding to the discussions about Manross and Birge, I found the following in my references:

    In Forestville Clockmakers by Roberts and Taylor, it says:

    "By the second half of the 1840's, spring clocks were becoming increasingly popular. Elisha Manross produced an 8-d. strap movement, driven by fusees, rather similar to the simplified weight-driven strap movements made by Birge & Fuller and Birge, Peck & Co. Manross placed this movement in sharp-Gothic-on-frame cases."

    I take this as confirmation that Manross did, in fact, make his own movements.

    Roberts' The Contributions of Joseph Ives to Connecticut Clock Technology 1810-1862 contains much information regarding the relationship between Birge and Ives (starting on page 126). It appears that Birge had license from Ives to produce the rolling-pinion movement and was also committed to protecting Ives from infringement of the patent. Manross was not a party to these agreements. Does the Manross movement have rolling pinions, or is the similarity primarily the use of brass straps to make the plates?

    Mike
    Thanks for the info!

    RM

  14. #29

    Default Re: Post your favorite American fusee clock. (RE: rmarkowitz1_cee4a1)

    Thought I would post a triple fusee steeple with an arrangement that would make Rube Goldberg proud.

    It is a standard sized steeple in what I consider "zebra" veneer bearing the label of William S. Johnson, a NYC "maker" who more than likely assembled clocks. It has been my experience that WSJ tablets are often wonderful. In my opinion, this one does not disappoint.

    It has a 30 hour brass time and strike fusee movement with fusee alarm. However, note how the alarm is driven by a remote fusee mounted in a separate wooden block. This remote fusee arrangement, ie, where the fusee is mounted below and requiring the fusee cord to reach diagonally across, is also encountered in the little S.B. Terry "box clocks" (they're actually time pieces).

    For further information, photos, and discussion, see NAWCC Bulletin, #296, 6/95, pages 363-4, figures 15 A-B. This is the same clock. Also note how my name is misspelled in the photo credit.

    RM
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_1910.JPG   IMG_1911.JPG   IMG_1913.JPG   IMG_1914.JPG  

  15. #30
    Registered user. Sooth's Avatar
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    Default Re: Post your favorite American fusee clock. (RE: rmarkowitz1_cee4a1)

    Wow, nice steeple clock. The zebra effect is caused by the natural variations in colour tone found in Rosewood. Similar to how you can have cherry with white and pink sections. I believe they just cut the rosewood veneer to repeat the pattern evenly (to great effect).

    I also agree about William S Johnson tablets. They tend to be all hand painted (or occasionally stencilled). I have two such examples in my collection (both on ogee clocks). One I restored the background colour (which was 90% missing) through very careful colour matching (took me about 20 colour samples): http://www.angelfire.com/me5/clockman/wsj.html
    The other clock (which I haven't got a photo of) has the typical columns and curtains with a vase in the centre (stencilled and hand painted). Unfortunately the tablet split in half down the centre on its way here. I plan to reglue it and use it. It's a clean break.

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