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  1. #31
    Registered User LaBounty's Avatar
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: bkerr)

    Installing an identical replacement movement for a modern German movement can be quite difficult without the "winding arbor locators" Shutt refers to. (Timesavers Part No. 23153, pg. 68, catalog no. 35) These hard plastic locators slip over the wind arbor or center shaft and help keep everything aligned while the movement feet are manipulated to line up with the original screw holes.

    They turn a 20 minute job into a 2 minute job.

  2. #32
    Registered User LaBounty's Avatar
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: bkerr)

    Back-mounted modern German movements, like those found on some wall clocks, are a bit more difficult but the winding arbor locators can still be used.

    -With the power let down, loosen the movement feet slightly so they can be adjusted with a bit of force.
    -Slip the movement over the studs in the back board or secure to the case with screws.
    -Loosely lay the dial over the movement and install the locators.
    -Shift the dial and movement together until the dial is in the proper place. This will shift the position of the movement feet.
    -Put a finger on the center shaft to hold the movement in place and remove the dial and locators.
    -Carefully remove the movement and tighten the nuts being sure that their positions don't change. It is sometimes advantageous to do one at a time, repeating the whole "locator" process until all four feet are tight.

  3. #33
    Forums Administrator harold bain's Avatar
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: LaBounty)

    Finding chain size for cuckoos and other chain drive clocks.
    This was posted by John Farnan (a fellow chapter 33 member) on the Blackforest Yahoo group page and I thought our members might find it useful:
    "The points on the sprocket are the important thing. If you cut a piece of paper in a strip that will fit inside the sprocket, and then gently press it in, the sprocket points will mark the paper. Then you can go to the page in Timesavers that has the chain patterns photocopied, and compare the sprocket points to the center of the chain links on the pattern. This should give you an accurate selection of chain."
    Thanks, John
    harold bain, Member ch 33
    "If it won't "tick",
    let me "tock" to it"

  4. #34
    Registered user. Scottie-TX's Avatar
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    Default Compiling a thread:

    Useful Hints and Tricks: A compilation.

  5. #35

    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: bkerr)

    Hi List,

    Hope this tip isn't already covered but here goes.

    If you do a lot of modern clock repair, it has been very helpful to me to collect front and back plates from several of the common movements. Strip them clean of rivets, post, etc. Carefully and precisely enlarge the front plate holes to 7/16" diameter. Then loosely wire the pair together and mark the pair with bold markings for identification.

    When you need to re-hole a (new or old) dial to fit a modern movement these plates make the job much easier. Just use the back plate (little holes) if you want to mark centers, and the front plates (7/16" holes) for reference in finishing the key holes.

    There is no doubt about things lining up as the template you are using is the actual movement plates.

    Willie X

  6. #36
    Registered user. Scottie-TX's Avatar
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: Willie X)

    Gauges I've made. Gauges come in a myriad of types and are very useful for quickly ascertaining a value of sort. Here's two I've made - a simple thread gauge making it easy to quickly identify a thread in question - nut or bolt. I made another for metric. The other is a drill bit size gauge nos. 1 to 60 - handy when you may be seeking a "go"/"no-go" reference.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails ATHRED.jpg   ATHRED 001.jpg  

  7. #37

    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: bkerr)

    I thought I'd re-post this simple little gadget. It's a movement holder for French roulant movements ...grasps the movement by the bottom pillar. Also works for alarm clocks.
    Attachment 52316 Attachment 52317
    The prototype, posted here several years ago (wish I could remember who dunnit), was made of block aluminum. I didn't have any, so I used oak. Seems to work just as well.

    bangster

    I've since learned that the prototype was made by Doug Sinclair. Thanks, Doug.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Roulant holder 1.jpg   Roulant holder 2.jpg  
    Last edited by bangster; 02-07-2017 at 12:10 PM.
    1. Check out the Repair Hints & How-To's forum. You may find your answer there.

  8. #38
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: bkerr)

    Quote Originally Posted by Thyme View Post
    Easier to simply buy a metal drill bit sizing stand and store your bits in it. IMHO, it's essential for precision work.
    Or one of these. The big advantage to this particular plate is it is hardened.I buy American machine screws by the gross in 1" lengths. That way, I can simply runthe length of screw I need though the plate, shear the excess length off with a cold chisel, and back the screw out, thus cleaning up the last thread, and it is good to ready to install. No messing about withclamping the screw in something, sawing it off and filing the end, all of which eats up time. And there is no need to stock a gzillion different lengths of screws of each size. So I just have six bins for each size screw: round head, flat head and cheese head, in brass and stainless. And buying them in bulk is a heck of a sight cheaper than buying in little shrink packs of anywhere from four to a dozen.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_1382.JPG  

  9. #39
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: Dave B)

    Here is another super-handy tool when you get the movement back together and discover the durned strike wheel with the locking pin is a tooth or two out of sync. As we all know, sometimes it can be an excercise in frustration to spread the plates enough to disengage and turn that wheel, without losing a whole slew of pivots all down the line. With these pliers, you can remove the nut on the corner pillar nearest the wheel, and loosen a couple of others. Then it is just a matter of spreading the plates and relocating the one wheel (and usually the fly, because its pivot falls out of the upper plate, and it flops around.) I originally bought these when I was doing automotive engine building. They are designed for spreading piston rings, and are available from nearly all the automotive parts houses. With the long handles, you have lots of control over how far you spread the plates.

    Incidentally, I at one time had the serations ground off the jaws, and discovered they have a tendency to slip. So I restored the checkering and now I just put a matchbook cover between the jaws and the plates to keep from marring things. I know most of you guys don't own a checkering file; that is the advantage of having worked as a gunsmith for a few years.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_1383.JPG   IMG_1384.JPG  

  10. #40
    Registered user. Scottie-TX's Avatar
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: bkerr)

    I'm clumsy. I've spilled far more oil than properly used so I made a spilpruf bottle holder by cutting a hole in a smal, squat box.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails AUSEFUL.jpg  

  11. #41

    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: bkerr)

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottie-TX View Post
    I'm clumsy. I've spilled far more oil than properly used so I made a spilpruf bottle holder by cutting a hole in a smal, squat box.
    Yep. Here's mine. Notice high-tech oil cup (crown cap epoxied to a metal scrap) and cover (from a milk jug).

    Attachment 54336

    bangster
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails oil block.jpg  
    1. Check out the Repair Hints & How-To's forum. You may find your answer there.

  12. #42
    Forums Administrator harold bain's Avatar
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: bangster)

    I think this is a good place to have a link to Charlie Davis's door hinge pivot polisher, which is a very useful trick:
    http://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?t...olisher&page=2
    harold bain, Member ch 33
    "If it won't "tick",
    let me "tock" to it"

  13. #43
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    Default Re: Pullers (By: bkerr)

    I never had much luck with pullers. They seemed to be clutsy and awkward. Never fitting in where they needed to go.
    My best success was in using square steel tube. Pick up pieces of scrap from a local shop.
    All you need is a hacksaw and a file and a machine screw tap. I have never had any problem with the threads in the tube not holding up for the jobs with clocks that I have been involved with. Also I have used a wide variety of machine screws to make the pushers. A couple of nuts "jammed" on the head end give planty of pressure with your fingers, most of the time.
    You notice that I often cut the slot in more than one side of the square and cut away the sides enough to get into tight places.
    Like they say, try it and you will find they really work. This goes along with my door hinge dead center lathe pivot polisher!
    http://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?t...pivot+polisher
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails MVC-001S.JPG  
    Charlie Davis, La Verne, CA
    http://www.JapaneseClockLogos.com

  14. #44
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    Default Useful Hints and Tricks (By: bkerr)

    What makes an ultrasonic cleaning unit fail? This question has been asked numerous times in this forum. Since these cleaning units are part of my equipment service business I will pass along what I know with certainty.

    There are two predominant causes of failure of an ultrasonic tank. One is chemical abuse, meaning use of acidic or caustic solutions in the tank. An ultrasonic tank is made of stainless steel and it is vulnerable to anything that will degrade that material of which it is made. Once a tank becomes corroded or perforated it is not repairable. L&R was a pioneer in ultrasonic cleaner design and use. They usually recommended putting their cleaning solutions in glass beakers that would be suspended in the tank, which would hold a bath of plain water. Since ultrasonic vibration is transmitted through all the liquid in the tank, it makes no difference whether there is a water bath present; but using a water bath will never harm the tank, whereas using a chemical solution directly in the tank can have the potential to do so. An exception would be detergent solutions that will not degrade stainless steel, in which case they can be used directly in the tank with no ill effect.

    Another cause of tank failure is that of a mechanical nature: if any objects are placed directly on the floor of the tank and they vibrate against it during cavitation, the action can cause failure of the transducers. Transducers are mounted on the underside of the tank surface and are the components that transmit the ultrasonic waves to the tank. They are not easily replaced and their failure usually renders the unit unrepairable. Thus the use of suspended glass beakers is recommended in a water bath. Alternatively, wire baskets are available for use with solution directly in the tank, designed to be suspended in the tank to keep objects from contacting the floor of the tank. If you don't want to buy the baskets you can improvise, using soft plastic or styrofoam containers instead to prevent shock impact to the floor of the tank.

    The final possible cause of unit failure is that of electronics. If that occurs it is not the fault of the user, but rather the design of the circuitry of the unit. Low priced machines of foreign manufacture can be of low quality and more susceptible to this type of deficiency; you get what you pay for.

    (A note to the moderators: feel free to make this a sticky for future reference if you think it is worthwhile.)

  15. #45
    Registered user. Mike Phelan's Avatar
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    Default Useful Hints and Tricks (By: bkerr)



    This was originally going to be a bit of an explanation on how to assemble and time the striking system, as I’ve seen quite a lot of confusion on the subject with suggestions on unnecessary splitting the plates and suchlike, but I thought I might as well go the whole hog and show a complete overhaul, so here we go.

    Remember that these were assembled on a production line where time is money, so the movements were made for easy assembly!

    As it’s quite a mundane job, feel free to yawn, snooze, or hit the [close] button.

    Subject:
    Smiths Enfield striking mantel clock. Inside rear of case shows a date 13-10-1951, for those who must know these things. A middle-of-the-range clock which should last for years and will surely appreciate in value.

    Fault:
    Not been run for a while; stopped when it was fully wound (surprise surprise!).

    Assessment:
    Probably gummed up mainsprings. I removed the movement, and after letting the springs down, they sounded and felt quite sticky, with numerous thumps and bumps!
    A look at the pivot holes saw that no bushing was needed, not even when I rocked the barrels. This latter is a favourite place for needing bushing, especially as the distance between the pivots is less that those of the train, and there is more power there. These have quite wide bushes, so wear well.
    The strip pallets weren’t worn, just polished, but the movement was very dirty. As the screw slots were all burred, it had been dismantled before and I suspected that the wheels and pinions might have been oiled as well.
    The suspension was undamaged despite the fact the clock had been carried with the bob attached.
    I don’t remove the star cam on the cannon pinion as the robust centre arbor can be washed and oiled before reassembly. As the wheel is at the back, it usually doesn’t wear much.

    Repair and assembly:
    So, the usual strip down, starting with the dial work. There are three of those awful bent pin things on the warning lever, rack hook and centre wheel spider spring. A paper clip is the right material and size to make new ones.
    You cannot remove the barrels until the centre wheel is removed.

    After removing the mainsprings there were no cracks in the holes, so I straightened them out to full length apart from the last couple of turns on the inside, wiped them with petrol to remove the sticky gunge and put them in plastic bags with a mixture of clock grease and turret clock oil, ready for later.
    All pivots were filed and burnished, but were quite good to start with.
    The remainder of the parts had a wash in ammoniated cleaner, followed with hot water and a dry in the oven.

    Springs put back by hand, lubricant cleaned off, inner coils checked to see if it gripped the arbors and a clean on the teeth and outside with IPA after the messy job of refitting the springs.

    Back together, barrels first, then a smear of oil on the centre arbor; fitted the washer, wheel and spring, all retained by the paper clip part. A quick check to test the friction.

    Everything else goes in and there’s no need at all to bother about timing the striking train; see later. Left pallets and dial work and hammer out at this time, but a tiny bit of TC oil on the hammer arbor pivots and its detent that interacts with the star.
    Oiled the barrel arbor pivots and assembled the ratchets and cocks, all including the clicks, with turret clock oil, then watch oil on all the other pivots, and a half turn on both sides of the key to make sure all was OK; it was whirring away nicely.

    Now to reassemble the dial work and set the timing for the strike; two “L” shaped paper clip bits ready for the rack hook and warning lever attachments.

    Here’s the way to do it:
    Fit warning lever (no lubrication) and clip, and if the Bend Fairy has been there, ensure that the 2-lobe cam on the cannon pinion can rotate backwards so the detent on the warning lever goes in front of a lobe.
    Fit rack hook, same sort of clip and no lube.
    The end faces on the detents that rub need a smear of oil.
    Hook the springs on the hammer arbor and rack hook, bending if necessary.

    Sometimes, the stop arm on the hammer arbor can get bent forwards or back; do not mend the tongue on the back plate that forms a rest for the arm. Give half a turn on the key and whilst lifting the rack hook train runs half a turn of the warning wheel at a time, allow the hammer arbor to “fall” and holding things there when the rack hook detent is arrested by the warning pin.

    At this point, there should be about 2mm clearance between the hammer detent and the next point on the star wheel to give (a) sufficient lift for the hammer and (b) to ensure the train can accelerate up to sped after the hammer blow. Adjust by bending the stop arm towards or away from the back plate.

    Clip something on the fly so the train cannot run. You can now fit the gathering pallet so the rack hook detent goes in the notch. By giving it a small tap with something like a piece of brass tube.

    When you take the clip off the fly and lift and drop the warning lever, the train should run for one blow and immediately stop after the last blow – there might be a slight adjustment needed by rotating the GP; if the train only runs one turn of the warning wheel and locks, the detent is not rising from the gathering pallet notch sufficiently; rotate gathering pallet anticlockwise.
    If it is out in the other direction it will fail to lock at all.

    When this is done, give the gathering pallet another tap with your brass tube to lock it securely. See – no plate splitting!

    Next thing is the motion work and rack. Clip a clothes peg on the escape wheel and turn the centre arbor until the longest lobe on the cannon pinion just allows the warning lever to drop – this is the hour. Fit the minute wheel and hour wheel (no clip yet) and the rack (with its clip). Adjust the meshing of the motion work so the rack falls on the snail centrally on the 10 or 11 steps, not, and I repeat not, on the 12! Why not? The big step on the snail is undercut so the 12 step is longer. As with many clocks.

    When this is done, give a few turns so the minute wheel pinion is visible, and fit the washer (ridge inwards) and clip, so the hour wheel cannot become out of mesh. When the rack drops, the sloping peg that falls on the snail should have its chamfered end halfway across the thickness of the snail with the hour wheel pushed right in. This is to allow the clock to run or the hands to be turned without jamming after 12.

    That was about it; back to first-person now!
    A wire brush on the hammer leather to soften it – they go hard over time and make an awful clang.
    I smeared the pallets and put tiny bit of oil on the pivots, then screwed the back cock on lightly. With a small turn of the key, I gently raised the cock until the train ran. It needs to be as deep as possible without catching teeth, or you’ll waste power with drop. Allow a turn of the wheel or two in case of teeth not perfect, and don’t hold anything.
    Finally, suspension and pendulum leader on; minute smear on crutch slot, and suspension clamped but free enough for a bit of fore-and-aft movement.

    Back on test stand, and job done!



    Mods - worth a sticky?






    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 1 - Stripped.jpg   2 - Clean.jpg   3 - Bottom plate.jpg   4 - Running.jpg  
    Mike - banned member of the throwaway society. :o

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