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  1. #1
    Registered User bkerr's Avatar
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    Default Useful Hints and Tricks

    ===============================================
    NOTE: THIS THREAD IS LOCKED TO FURTHER POSTS.
    TO GO TO THE RELATED OPEN THREAD, CLICK HERE.

    TO GO TO THE INDEX, CLICK HERE.

    --moderator's note

    =============================================== The other day I came up with what I think may be a use for those empty pill bottles that I seem to keep for what ever reason. I don't know why but I just cannot see throwing them in the trash. Anyway, I have a selection of tapered pins that are packaged in plastic bags. I grabbed a piece of scrap wood, got out the 1 1/4" Forstner bit set the drill press and this is the result. With a few labels I now have a place to put those dang bagged pins. Also, I have a quick reference number in case I need to reorder. -> posts merged by system
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    Last edited by bangster; 02-06-2012 at 11:34 AM.

  2. #2
    Registered User bkerr's Avatar
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    Default Compiling a thread: (By: bkerr)

    Bangster's Bright Idea
    USEFUL HINTS & TRICKS INDEX

    FOR LOCKED THREAD THROUGH POST #53
    AND ONGOING THREAD (LINK) THROUGH POST 252
    (NUMBERS WITH LETTER “b”.)


    Adhesive
    mixing epoxy 48b
    Alignment
    winding arbor alignment 20,21,31,32,77b
    Animal hair
    uses for 50b,51b,52b,53b
    Arbor
    winding arbor alignment 20,21,31,32,77b
    Bottles
    pill bottles 1,2; spice bottles 191b
    Bushing
    bushing aid 5; making bushings 212b
    Chain
    determining chain size 33
    Containers
    pill bottles 1,2; spice bottles 191b; 14b,15b
    Cuckoo
    testing rack for cuckoos 167b,172b,173b
    Dial
    re-holing a dial 35
    Dremel
    opening hand hole 206b; uses 218b,219b
    Drill, Drilling
    drill oblique holes 29; drill press 27b,28b,29b,32b; sizing drill bits 131
    Epoxy
    mixing epoxy 48b
    Escapement
    escapement analyzer 232b
    Furniture
    typing table workbench 4; tensor lamp stand 6
    Gauge
    gauges 36; feeler gauge 38b
    Hand
    opening hand hole 206b
    Hermle
    Hermle winding tool 23
    Holder
    tensor lamp stand 6; test stand 26; oil bottle holder 40,41; movement holder 7; roulant holder 37
    Lathe
    lathe cover 4; tools from cut nails 17; tapping with lathe 27b; lathe hints 35b,38b; center finder 239b; testing lathe center 13
    Letdown
    letdown aid 24; letdown tool 25,48,92b;222b
    Lighting
    tensor lamp stand 6
    Lubricants
    oil bottle holder 40,41; oil dippers 47; WD-40 144b,149b
    Mainspring
    measuring mainspring 28; servicing mainspring 28
    Materials
    cut nails 17; bicycle spokes 188b; styrofoam 16; geneva stop retainers 252b; shim stock 38
    Movement
    movement holder 7; roulant holder 37
    Pendulum
    pendulum slip joint 22; pendulum stick repair 151b,152b; temporary pendulum 250b
    Photography
    pictures with loupe 244b,248b
    Pivot
    polishing pivots 243b; door hinge pivot polisher 42
    Plate
    plate supporter 12; plate spreading tool 39
    Procedures
    make a thin washer 3; measure mainspring length 28; service mainspring 28; re-holing a dial 35; the shotgun approach 46; tapping 28b,29b,32b; crushing shellac 177b,183b; gathering pallet removal 199b; opening hand hole 206b; making bushings 212; polishing pivots 243b; drill oblique holes 29; striking clock tutorial 45
    Regulation
    fine-tuning regulation 157b,160b; discussion of regulating 165b
    Screw
    screw sizing plate, screw shortening aid 38; dropped screw catcher 49,52; nut & bolt sizer 124b;
    Shellac
    crushing shellac 177b
    Shim stock
    shim stock 38
    Soldering
    soldering aid 9,10,18,19
    Stand
    tensor lamp stand 6; test stand 26
    Tapping
    tapping with drill press or lathe 28b,29b,32b
    Tools
    clamp 8; pickup tools 14; magnetized screwdriver 15; styrofoam circle cutter 16; tools from cut nails 17; Hermle winding tool 23; tweezers from hemostat 30; gauges 36; plate spreading tool 39; door hinge pivot polisher 42; pullers 43; razorblade radio 67b; nut & bolt sizer 124b; Dremel 218b, 219b;
    Tweezers
    about tweezers 27; tweezers from hemostat 30
    Ultrasonic
    ultasonic hints 44
    Washer
    make a thin washer 3; tension washer 12
    Winding
    winding arbor alignment 20,21,31,32,77b; Hermle winding tool 23
    Last edited by harold bain; 07-28-2011 at 10:09 AM.

  3. #3
    Registered user. Scottie-TX's Avatar
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: bkerr)

    Here's one you may like:
    Ever need to file an extremely small thin washer or spacer? You didn't?
    Oh well. I did.
    I cut the head off a nail and drove it into this wood block.
    Now I can place the spacer on the nail and file away with absolute control of the piece!
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  4. #4
    Registered user. neighmond's Avatar
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: bkerr)

    Well these are neat! Here's one I may have shared once before:

    I have a both types of bushings and reamers for my KWM machine, and both in brass and bronze. The machine is sort of a nuisance to store too, so when a friend died I went to his sale and bought the typewriter holder. The paper trays hold the bushings, cleaning brsh, extra reamers, &c. , and the cabinet keeps the bushing tool free from dust and under wraps when not in use.

    Both sides fold down, and the left wing sets a little higher than the right, for those times I want the machine to be higher up. Either way, it is the perfect solution.
    -> posts merged by system <-
    'nother one!

    We all know the lathe will last longer and stay cleaner if covered up when not in use, right? Well the junk shop near me had this for sale for 10 bucks! It's a sewing machine lid. You can find the old domed singer ones sometimes, too.

    Also, an old roll-front bread box will do a pretty nice job holding cutting stones, oil, odds and ends.
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    Every man must have a purpose to strive for, A cause to fight for, A dream to live for, Because A Man without a Dream is Dead

  5. #5
    Registered User doug sinclair's Avatar
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: neighmond)

    Did you ever re-bush the bearing of the strike side fourth wheel in the back plate, and later find when you went to push the gathering pallet back into place on the extended fourth wheel pivot on the front plate, that you pushed the bushing in the back plate, out? Or on an Urgos triple chime GF movement, when you rebush the time side third wheel pivot in the back plate, when you proceed to re-assemble the spring loaded wheel on the front side that drives the center arbor, that you push the back bushing out? Well I have had these problems in past years. That is until I made the simple tool you'll see in the image. With the clock facing up on assembly pegs, adjust the height of this tool to the correct height, and slide it under the bushing in the back plate. Then proceed and assemble the front components with no problem. This is simply a block of aluminum drilled and tapped, a machine screw or carriage bolt of the correct thread with the head cut off, and a brass cap fitted to the top end to prevent damaging the pivot or the bushing. Slick!
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  6. #6
    Registered user. Scottie-TX's Avatar
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: neighmond)

    Here's one I contrived very recently. Often I find need for strong light on my subject movement and teeter the lamp base on the stand's upright.
    Here's a "CRASH" just waiting to happen.
    Small nail in a scrappa wood; hole in the upright - VOILA!
    Lamp holder platform.
    Hole in upright is larger than nail. When not needed, lift and remove platform!
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  7. #7
    Registered User bkerr's Avatar
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: bkerr)

    Scottie, that looks like the same nail (prior to wacking) that you had for the bushings. LOL

    Hey guys, I really like the ideas and a couple I will borrow for my shop as well.

    Here is another that I cannot take credit for. This is a clamp that fits in the vice on my table / bench. The orginals were made of good tool steel. The ones I have were made with square key stock that you can get at the local hardware (guess there are not many of those left). They work great, very fast and can be used in both vertical and horizontal position.
    Cost is, a piece of key stock, two socket head cap screws and a few minutes on the mill. Oh yes, drill and tap two holes also.

    I will assemble in the horizontal and unscrew the vise and reposition a plate, filp it vertical to test run the movement.
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  8. #8
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: bkerr)

    A while back, I needed a small clamp to hard solder a broken rack tail on a Korean clock. I made this one out of a couple of woodruff keys and some 4-40 threaded rod and hex stock. A couple of bushings filed at an angle took care of the rounded backs of the keys. Took maybe half an hour or so - the longest part being spent filing the tips down small enough to fit the job.

    Another little tip - I mounted my small machine tools on cutting boards, so I can hang them on the wall out of the way when I am not using them. I have a 6mm Booley lathe, my Unimat 3 and my springwinder all mounted that way. (The Peavy PA amp in the closet does double duty as a beat amplifier when I am not playing music jobs. I use a clamp on musical instrument tuner pickup that I got for under $20.00 from my local band instrument store.)

    The office supply drawer dividers are a handy way to store pocket watches while they are apart, waiting for parts on order.
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  9. #9
    Forums Administrator harold bain's Avatar
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: Dave B)

    Dave, this is what I use to hold 2 pieces close together for soldering. A couple of alligator clips on a steel bar. They can easily be moved closer or further apart. Hold it in a vice or lay it on a piece of hardwood.
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    harold bain, Member ch 33
    "If it won't "tick",
    let me "tock" to it"

  10. #10
    Registered user. Scottie-TX's Avatar
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: bkerr)

    I use a third hand fixture for the alligator clip setup.

  11. #11
    Registered User Jeff C's Avatar
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: bkerr)

    I use this PVC pipe collar as a support for doing bushing work. I added this removable grate for work that needs support like with a small movements. Spacing of the grate is wide enough for all of my KWM cutters. It fits flush with the collar and just drops in. I use this together with a small drill press which I rewired to be controlled by a variac.
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  12. #12
    Registered user. Scottie-TX's Avatar
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: Jeff C)

    A rerun for many here, still a good'n - attaching hands to a movement - this one a wiener, where pressure must be applied to the minute hand to load tension washer. You don't wanna bend the crutch or put the anchor pivots at risk in the process.
    A small box with two notches provide clearance for the crutch. Other types of boxes and cutouts may be necessary for other types of movements.
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  13. #13
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: Scottie-TX)

    If you buy a used lathe - or if like me, you don't trust the lathe you have, you can use a razor blade to check how well the tailstock lines up to center on the headstock. (You can also use it to test whether you have a cutting tool on center against a piece of round stock, if you are using a "fixed" tool post. If the cutting edge of the tool is on center, the blade will be vertical.) Chuck a piece of scrap in the headstock, and turn a tapered point on it. Place a center in the tailstock, bring it up to the headstock, and nip a razor blade between the two. If the centers agree, the blade will be both vertical and perpendicular to the ways. (The side of the tip over tool rest makes a nice perpendicular line for "eyeballing", if you shove it up against the base of the headstock.) For this photo, I purposely threw the tailstock off-center by putting a piece of paper between it and the bed way on one side. Your test will probably not be this far out of whack, so , while clamping the razor blade, rotate the headstock or the tailstock, and watch to see if the razor blade moves. If rotating the headstock makes it move - the bearings need adjustment. It will probably wobble back and forth in one or both planes. (It does on all four of my lathes when I rotate the tailstock spindle.) When I need to do accurate work, I do this first and find the "sweet spot", then take care not to rotate the tailstock spindle.

    (WHEW!! - It took more time to type this than it does to do the test.!)
    -> posts merged by system <-
    When tapping a drilled hole, I chuck the tap in the drill press, and start it in turning the quill by hand. That way, I know the tap is not going in askew. I do the same thing using a die to cut external threads - I leave the workpiece in the lathe, and use the tailstock with a flat pusher to keep the die perpendicular to the workpiece.
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  14. #14
    Registered user. Scottie-TX's Avatar
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: bkerr)

    "Look into a feeler gauge";
    Hmmmmm. Never tried that.
    Anyway, here's one. The mechanic's helper. NO shop should be without at least one. Here, three: One, a jointed end, one a pencil style, and th' big boy for fishing stuff out from underneath th' fridge. A jillion uses for 'em like picking up teeny hands or microsize washers, bolts, nuts, etc. near impossible to pick up with your fangers.
    Mechanics' helpers - ours too.
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  15. #15
    Registered User bkerr's Avatar
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    Default Re: Useful Hints and Tricks (By: bkerr)

    You are right Scottie on those tools.
    I keep them near the bench when things land on the floor.

    Here is another one for you. I work on quite a few cuckoos. When putting the screws back in the case for the movement I keep a screw driver that has been magnetized to hold the screw so it does not drop off the end of the screw driver.

    I also use the same screw driver as a chain grabber. when you are putting the chains through the case, the magnetized screw driver will grab the chain allowing you to finish pulling the chain through the case.

    These two will save a bunch of time.:o

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