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  1. #1
    Registered User Greg Davis's Avatar
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    Default "New Era" Timepieces

    New Era USA is the mark used on low-grade New York Standard watches (not to be confused with New York Watch Company products, the forerunner of Hampden). If you wish to learn more about your watch, consult the watch books under New York Standard Watch Co, or troll eBay searching for New York in the pocket watch section. Many of the hits will include watches just like yours. Millions were made... it seems that millions have survived to this day.

    - Greg

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  2. #2
    Registered User Greg Davis's Avatar
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    Default "New Era" Timepieces (RE: Greg Davis)

    We can't discuss values here. Check the eBay listings for a sense of the value. Also note that condition plays a large part, so you need to understand all the factors that play into condition.

    - Greg

    150941
    Ch.149 member #77

  3. #3

    Default "New Era" Timepieces (RE: Greg Davis)

    Kurt:

    The trade mark registration for an arm and hammer symbol, dated May 19, 1896, is reproduced in the book "History of the American Watch Case," Warren H. Niebling, Whitmore Publishing, Philadelphia, PA, 1971 (available on loan by mail to members from the NAWCC Library & Research Center). The symbol was registered under the name Theophilus Zurbrugg. On page 48 of the book it is stated that "MR. THEOPHILUS ZURBRUGG bought out the watch case company of Leichty & Le Bouba in 1884, in Philadelphia, Pa. ... About 1888 he changed the name to the Philadelphia Watch Case Co. He made various types of cases, using a crown as one trademark and an arm and hammer as another. ... The company moved to Riverside, N.J. in 1902."

    This has bearing because the Philadelphia Watch Case Company then went on to issue a Watch Catalog - (scroll upwards) (courtesy of Duke University's "Emergence of Advertising in America" website), the movements being sold in Philadelphia cases. The first two pages of that catalog feature watches carrying New Era movements.

    Kent

    That guy down in Georgia
    Kent
    That guy down in Georgia

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