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  1. #1
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    Default Identify old lathe

    I'm borrowing this old Dear off a friend while my Bergeon 8mm is out of commission. Can anyone recognise, date, name it?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails P3300027.jpg  

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Identify old lathe (RE: Hayson)

    PS. It is 1/4" (rather than 8mm) with triangular bed. No identifying marks that I can see but very good quality although rather dirty and some bits damaged or missing. it also has a nice cross slide and face plate mandrel not pictured.
    Last edited by Hayson; 04-03-2009 at 08:29 PM.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Identify old lathe (RE: Hayson)

    Nice looking lathe better than what i have, this is a watch maker,s lathe ?
    I have a Peerless but very few acesories.
    One clock at a time. Kevin West
    http://www.global-horology.com/GHMB/

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    Default Re: Identify old lathe (RE: Kevin W.)

    Hi Kevin. Yes, it's a watchmakers lathe with all the goodies like wax chucks and rose cutters etc etc. I'm guessing English late 1800's, but a guess is all it is. It has been a real beauty in it's day but triangular beds went out of favour a long time ago and this has been used hard and then neglected for a long time so a bit sad. A great project to restore for an enthusiast though and someone out there in watch-world can probably identify it.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Identify old lathe (RE: Hayson)

    Quote Originally Posted by Hayson View Post
    I'm borrowing this old Dear off a friend while my Bergeon 8mm is out of commission. Can anyone recognise, date, name it?
    Good Day Hayson,

    To me it looks much like the early Boley lathe. Image is not very good, but I can recognise many details on it. It has strong resemblance to my Boley turns, triangular bed too, from about the same period. Tail-stock looks identical.

    In the Watchmakers' Handbook by Claudius Saunier, there is a very good description of it with some very nice illustrations as well.

    If You can post few more images taken at different angles, showing few more details, I am sure that it could be identified.

    Richard Watkins has one of these lathes, with triangular bed, very much like yours. Richard sent me some images of it several years ago and the headstock on your lathe is about identical to his.

    Cheers

    Dushan
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Very old G. Boley Turns.jpg  
    Last edited by Dushan Grujich; 04-04-2009 at 01:52 PM. Reason: image addition
    >> Experience is the name everyone gives to their mistakes. << - Oscar Wilde (1854 - 1900)

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    Default Re: Identify old lathe (RE: Dushan Grujich)

    Thanks Dushan. I'll post better pics when I get the chance. I've aslo promised Tony Griffiths at lathes.co.uk to send him better pics as well but too many calls on my time (I shouldn't be writing this now ). Do you know whether Boley worked in inch sizes? This is definitely a 1/4" lathe not a metric size. I agree your pic looks very similar.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Identify old lathe (RE: Hayson)

    Quote Originally Posted by Hayson View Post
    Do you know whether Boley worked in inch sizes? This is definitely a 1/4" lathe not a metric size. I agree your pic looks very similar.
    Hayson,

    Before Germany went metric they used their own system of measures. One of the units were "Zoll" which translates into inch, although it was not the same as Imperial inch, as a matter of fact it varied from one part of Germany to another, until metric system was adopted in late nineteenth century, officially in 1868 but in practice much later reaching all the way into twentieth century.

    My answer to You is: Yes, Boley definitely used "zoll" (inch) derived as 1/12 part of FuŖ (foot). In the area where G. Boley was located in the town of Esslingen, the following applied: 1' = 313.87 mm and 1'' = 26.16 mm.

    Unfortunately I am not at liberty to show Richard Watkins' images of the lathe that he sent me, without his consent, but it would be interesting to compare the two lathes.

    Cheers

    Dushan
    >> Experience is the name everyone gives to their mistakes. << - Oscar Wilde (1854 - 1900)

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    Default Re: Identify old lathe (RE: Dushan Grujich)

    I need to retract my assertion that it is 1/4". Don't know how I did that. Think I hastily measured a collet thread instead of the pipe behind it and only had 1/2 my poor brain engaged. The actual dia of a collet pipe is .280" which is mighty close to 7mm. Definitely not either 1/4" imperial or 1/4 "zoll" either. Fascinating hearing about "fuss" & "zoll" by the way. Just like pouce and lignes. As you say it's the same all 'round Europe and Britain. I imagine they all inherited a version of the system used by the Romans and it lost it's integrity during the fragmentation of the early middle ages ??

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    Default Re: Identify old lathe (RE: Hayson)

    Dushan, I've just hunted up my old copy (is there any other type )of Saunier 1948, and found on pp.194-196 the illustrations to which I think you refer. I see what you mean about the similarity but I wouldn't say it's the same lathe. I think mine is somewhat later than the one illustrated which would presumably have been state of the art in the 1880's when the first ed. was published. Definitely the same design family but maybe when I post better pics someone will stick their neck out and put a name to it.

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