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  1. #241

    Default Re: Your newest aquisition. (RE: lazy pendulum)

    Kienzle Dual Chime Westminster/Whittington Hump Back Mantle Clock from England.

    The clock has a small indented dent on the top someone filled with putty or bondo. Suggestions for repair? (Fill with wood putty and stain or cut out a square of oak veneer, match grain best as possible and restain?)

    I can post a pic if need be. Thanks.

    L2L
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Kienzle_1.jpg   Kienzle_2.jpg  

  2. #242
    Registered User Scottie-TX's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your newest aquisition. (RE: lazy pendulum)

    Nice find; Very nice find. From the front view, really doesn't appear to be oak, but we'll not trifle about that. From your description, reads to me like perhaps a veneer plug procedure. However that would depend on size of damage and - yes - for that diagnosis we do need a picture.
    Congrats!

  3. #243

    Default Re: Your newest aquisition. (RE: lazy pendulum)

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottie-TX
    Nice find; Very nice find. From the front view, really doesn't appear to be oak, but we'll not trifle about that. From your description, reads to me like perhaps a veneer plug procedure. However that would depend on size of damage and - yes - for that diagnosis we do need a picture.
    Congrats!
    Scotty: Thanks- I paid about $158 at today's miserable exchange rate, but the shipping was exhorbitant (about 60 pounds=$120). DHL is cheapest for those importing from Britain. I really liked the dual chime which is unusual to me for a clock this age. The chime sounds wonderful on 8 rods, whether in Westminster or Whittington, and the lever also has a silent feature, which comes in handy if one is married and wants to stay that way.

    Attached are pictures of the dunch- any ideas on which method, fill or a veneer patch, appreciated.

    L2L
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSC00741.JPG   DSC00734.JPG   DSC00735.JPG   DSC00733.JPG   DSC00740.JPG  


  4. #244
    Registered User Scottie-TX's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your newest aquisition. (RE: lazy pendulum)

    Ah yes! Now that IS oak.
    I'm certain others will have varied suggestions, but for me it would be a veneer patch. Tough challenge there of course will be matching the tone. Looks like what - about a half inch by three quarter inch?

  5. #245

    Default Re: Your newest aquisition. (RE: lazy pendulum)

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottie-TX
    Ah yes! Now that IS oak.
    I'm certain others will have varied suggestions, but for me it would be a veneer patch. Tough challenge there of course will be matching the tone. Looks like what - about a half inch by three quarter inch?
    The grain reminded me of oak, the tone is a lovely reddish brown similar to mahogany. Your dimensions are on the money. I shall excise the damaged area, fill it level with stainable filler from Minwax, cut an oak square the same size, glue it in. Perhaps I will use a red oak mixed with a bit of mahogany to get the tone.

    This is a rather ordinary looking clock with a gorgeous chime.

    L2L

  6. #246

    Default Re: Your newest aquisition. (RE: lazy pendulum)

    It is English oak, differs from American oak in that English oak has a brownish patina. Do not use American red oak; it will turn pink if mahogany stain (which is on your clock case now) is applied. Must use American white oak, vertical grain to achieve the brownish color of the English oak, provided the stain is applied correctly.

    Following is one of the many procedures to repair the clock case:
    1. Mix sanding sealer and fine sawdust of white oak and fill the defect halfway. (do not dig out the defect, this will compound the problem). Allow to dry for 24 hours.

    2. mix more sanding sealer with sawdust and fill the hole up to approx. 1/16" below level of the land of the case. Try to get this second application as level and as smooth as possible.

    3. Take a piece of veneer (thin) and glue below the level of the land of the case. Must not be flush with case.

    4. Take a second piece of veneer larger than the defect and allow it to overlap the outside of the perimeter of the hole, keeping the grain running the same way as the original veneer. Make sure there is no dimple below the level of the land. If there is a dimple, place another small piece on top the piece already glued. Then put the large piece on top when no dimple is detected.

    5. After all the veneer is dry, sand the oversized veneer, taking care to sand the edges of the veneer to allow them to blend into the ragged edges of the defect. If the edges are loose after sanding, inject a small amount of glue with a syringe and allow to dry before sanding again. With patience and diligence, you will not be able to tell where the defect was. Wood filler is a NO NO as it will show, even through the best finish.

    If you do have any imperfections along the edges, fill with sanding sealer/fine sawdust mixture, allow to dry. Then sand again.

    6. To finish the piece, you might have to use some special walnut Minwax stain. Apply some to the new piece and allow to dry to "tacky" stage. If too dark, sand with 600 wet/dry (dry) to remove part of the stain.
    Then take 600 wet/dry, sand the whole case with WET. Then sand with 1200 (wet) and then 2400 (wet). After case is thoroughly dry and cleaned, apply sanding sealer to the entire case. Minwax spray is good as it dries quickly. The reason to sand down in this manner is to eliminate "fish eye."

    7. Now sand the first spray with 600 wet/dry (wet). Dry completely, then spray second coat of sanding sealer. When this is dry, sand again with 600 wet and then 1200 wet. Spray third coat. Then sand again with 600 wet, 1200 wet, 2400 wet. Now you are ready for the first top coat finish.

    8. Apply Minwax spray lacquer. Allow to dry. Sand with 1200 wet. spray another coat of lacquer. Sand with 2400 and rubbing oil, which can be mineral spirits. Clean and sand with Rotten stone and oil (get from any good furniture care supplier) Wash case, wait about 48 hours until completely dry. Then polish with Minwax paste or Brie wax paste and buff to hard finish. Case will look like a million dollars

    This seems like a long procedure, but when finished you will have a beautiful finish on the case.

    If you need some white oak, just PM me with your mailing address and we will send you some.
    Hope this helps.
    Tony
    Clocksiam

  7. #247

    Default Re: Your newest aquisition. (RE: lazy pendulum)

    Tony, Thank you so much- that is absolutely awesome and will benefit not only me but everyone on here!

    I can get white oak pieces to sand and white oak veneer at the woodworking supply store (I use Rocklers). I can get the sanding sealer and stains there as well.

    I have a couple of questions, if you dont mind. When you say wet sand, is that always with mineral spirits? I presume never water.

    Also, you call for sanding the entire case. The pix dont show it but the base of the case has some decorative molding. I dont want to spoil it accidentally with sanding. Would fine steel wool do as well?

    Thanks again for the wonderful instruction.

    L2L

  8. #248
    Registered user. Sooth's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your newest aquisition. (RE: lazy pendulum)

    One of my most recent acquisitions is this stunning mantle clock by the Empire company (England). It's from about the 1920's. The eBay auction said that it was made by Henry Williamson, under the Empire Clock Co, but I can find no evidence of this. It may be true, however, because I had a VERY hard time finding info about Henry Williamson, but he did own the Empire company at some point.

    This clock will need a full cleaning, I have unbent the gong stand, and I will also have to repair the two broken front feet (the feet on this clock are very unusual, because they are routed/shaped all the way around (4 blocks are the same). I COULD probably just remove them, and rotate them, but they look like they are really well glued onto the case, and rather than risk damaging them, I will simply repair them, which will be harder. I may also try to fix the missing tip of the bell flowers on the left side.





    The suspension and bob are pretty unusual on this clock. The pendulum is cylindrical, and mounts on the end of a very long suspension spring, in a similar style as a grandfather clock, where there is a brass "block" where the crutch joins the suspension. But rather than turn into a pend rod, there's just a hook cut into it. I will take better photos once I clean the movement.



    EDIT: The funny thing about this clock, is that I got it on eBay in the UK for only 12.00 GBP. But with the shipping, my total came up to about 67.00 GBP (146.00 CAD). I had a hard time believing that no one else bid on it.

    My other recent clock is an Ansonia Pauline parlor clock in solid walnut. It needs a bit of work, and I haven't taken photos of it yet.
    [edit=1913=1185326671][/edit]

  9. #249

    Default Re: Your newest aquisition. (RE: lazy pendulum)

    Hi Sooth,

    Quote: Mr. Baxter and H. W. Williamson Ltd. of Coventry amalgamated their clock factories in 1921. The firm of Messrs. Williamson was founded in 1871 by H. Williamson and by 1903 they had factories at Coventy, Salisbury and Buren, Chaux de Fonds, Switzerland. Their main offices and showrooms being at 77-79 (and later 81) Farringdon Road, London. Watches were made at Coventry and Buren while the clocks and speedometers were being produced at the Salisbury factory. In 1909 a major fire destroyed this factory with a financial loss to the company in the order of 50,000 pounds. It was possible, however, to expand the Coventry factory to provide new and larger clockmaking workshops. One reason why this firm were able to offer such a wide range of cheap longcase and bracket clocks was due to the fact that thier founder had realised the need for the "new" mass production methods and had actually persuaded one of the leading men to come from the Hamburg American Clock factory in Germany to advise. The Buren factory expanded to include the manufacture of clock movements (mainly those with lever platform escapements) but unfortunately as the importation of clocks into this country (England) was heavily resricted at this date (1914) only a few could be imported under licence. The cases were English made. H. Williamson died in 1914 but the firm copntinued with varying degrees of success until the early 1920's when they decided to amalgamate with Grimshaw and Baxter. By 1925 they had evolved a manufacturing and marketing policy that concentrated on low priced striking movements and thereby were able to compete with other manufacturers. These were marketed under the name of "Astral" with a later range "Empire" appearing in 1928. By 1930, however, they were once more in difficulties and it became necessary to appoint Receivers. H. W. Williamson Ltd. became part of English Watch and Clock Manufacturers Ltd. which was taken over by Smiths Ltd. in 1934. The names "Astral" and "Empire" were continued by the successive purchasers of the original Williamson company. Both Astral and Empire pendulum and platform lever movements were still in production in 1942 but by 1955 only the Coventry Astral lever movements were still being produced by Smith's English Clocks Ltd. End Quote. Ref: Collelctable Clocks 1840-1940, Shenton.

    The partial photo is of the movement of a HWW clock that I have. It is a double fusee, ting-tang strike. I will try the pictures again since there was a problem.

    You can see the trademark ( a key with Salisbury) on it on the gong stand.

    Regards,

    Richard T.
    [edit=2214=1185330226][/edit]
    [edit=2214=1185330303][/edit]
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails HWWClock2..jpg  
    Best,
    Richard T.

  10. #250

    Default Re: Your newest aquisition. (RE: lazy pendulum)

    Only the last two stages after you have applied the final finish will you use oil and rottenstone (2400 gt.) Get the rubbing oil and rubbing block and rottenstone from Rockler. They sell all of these.

    Do not use steel wool. This will leave an oily residue, which will make the finish "fish eye" and you don't want that. Keep steel wool for steel!

    Tony

    p.s. wait for the comments on steel wool

  11. #251
    Registered user. kirxklox's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your newest aquisition. Volume 3 (RE: new2clocks)

    This thread has been split into multiple Volumes. For your convenience, the following LINKS have been added to each thread.

    http://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?t=44290 Your newest aquisition. Volume 1
    http://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?t=44322 Your newest aquisition. Volume 2
    http://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?t=44320 Your newest aquisition. Volume 3
    http://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?t=44299 Your newest aquisition. Volume 4
    http://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?t=44318 Your newest aquisition. Volume 5
    http://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?t=44319 Your newest aquisition. Volume 6
    http://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?t=44292 Your newest aquisition. Volume 7

    Sam Kirk

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