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  1. #16
    Registered User cazboy's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to repair fire damage? (RE: Chris Radano)

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Radano View Post
    Here are a couple photos from Tran Duy Ly's ingraham book.
    Wow, that's exciting. Does Tran's book show the back of a Huron? Chris Radano mentioned that it is important to have the original pendulum - and Tran's book clearly shows it. Attached, here, is the pendulum supplied to me.

    How can I determine whether or not the original dial was painted? Maybe I need to contact an Ingraham collector who has a Huron in original condition. How would I do that?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSCF3156.jpg   DSCF3155.jpg  
    Doug Haeussler, NAWCC #0167553 - Prescott Valley, AZ

  2. #17
    Registered user. Joseph Bautsch's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to repair fire damage? (RE: cazboy)

    Cazboy - If you decide to leave it alone try using shellac on the burned area. It will soak into the burned area and seal it up. It will harden the charcoal so that it will not come off on the fingers as well as eliminate the odor.

  3. #18
    Registered user. Chris Radano's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to repair fire damage? (RE: Joseph Bautsch)

    I did not see any pics of the back. The pieces of yours were probably added, but look old. Maybe there is a backboard split underneath? The back pieces may bother some people, but to me no big deal. For the price, I wouldn't be picky.

    I would figure someone here would know about your dial query. I wouldn't be surprised if some dials were originally painted, and other dials were originally paper.

    One of my good wall clocks has a replaced paper dial. That is the only one I can think of that I will probably have repainted someday. The replaced dial is not bad, but it is such a good clock that it deserves to have a repaint IMO.

  4. #19

    Default Re: How to repair fire damage? (RE: cazboy)

    Hi Dough!
    Before giving further advice I´d like to see the interior of the case without the mvm.:The reversed T on the back doesn´t look original,but old.Someone has naild it there for a certain reason.Maybe it stabelizes a split back of the case??Should know that before You remove!Perhaps only cut off the surplus on both sides??
    Looking close to the (beautyfull)veneer I see that the grain "runs out "of the surface left from the middle of the central arc(Lookig from back).That gives me the idea to replace the damaged section with a loooong triagular sheet of veneer perhaps 10-15mm wide and ca60-80mm long with the tip of it "running out" also to the left and only a short zig-zag joint ca.10 mm right of the defect.Should be allmost invisible!(Hope You understand what I mean)
    Burkhard

  5. #20
    Forums Administrator harold bain's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to repair fire damage? (RE: Burkhard Rasch)

    Doug, the original dial is likely still under that replacement paper (either painted or paper). If you could loosen it and pull it back, you should be able to tell what is under it. If you are replacing it anyway (might as well), you can't hurt anything
    harold bain, Member ch 33
    "If it won't "tick",
    let me "tock" to it"

  6. #21
    Registered User cazboy's Avatar
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    Default Q (RE: harold bain)

    [QUOTE=Chris Radano;317484]I did not see any pics of the back.QUOTE]

    Chris, pics of the back are at the end of my first post in this thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by Burkhard Rasch View Post
    Hi Dough!
    Before giving further advice I´d like to see the interior of the case without the mvm.

    Looking close to the (beautyfull)veneer I see that the grain "runs out "of the surface left from the middle of the central arc(Lookig from back).That gives me the idea to replace the damaged section with a loooong triagular sheet of veneer perhaps 10-15mm wide and ca60-80mm long with the tip of it "running out" also to the left and only a short zig-zag joint ca.10 mm right of the defect.Should be allmost invisible!(Hope You understand what I mean)
    Burkhard
    Hi Burkhard! OK I'll try to get pics of the case interior. Not sure if I'll have time as I am getting ready to go to California for my F101 suitcase class. But I should have time, other obligations permitting. I am sorry Burkhard, but I do NOT understand what you mean about the veneer. Once I get back from class I'll have more time to concentrate. I was going to contact you anyway because I've seen some of the restorations you've accomplished and they are always superb.

    Quote Originally Posted by harold bain View Post
    Doug, the original dial is likely still under that replacement paper (either painted or paper). If you could loosen it and pull it back, you should be able to tell what is under it. If you are replacing it anyway (might as well), you can't hurt anything
    That's a GREAT idea. I will do that in the next day or so. I will moisten a cotton swab with a drop of water and touch the dial's edge - and wait to see if that spot can be lifted.

    Gotta go. My wife is yelling at me to get ready for church. "Get off that computer!"
    Doug Haeussler, NAWCC #0167553 - Prescott Valley, AZ

  7. #22

    Default Re: Q (RE: cazboy)

    Hi Dough!
    That´s the problem with my school-English I cannot overcome.What I can do is make a drawing of what I mean,take a photo and post .I was afraid of being cryptic,sorry!
    Burkhard
    Last edited by Burkhard Rasch; 10-05-2008 at 11:57 AM.

  8. #23

    Default Re: How to repair fire damage? (RE: Burkhard Rasch)

    OK,here we go with a scheme of how to place the veneer:The pics intend to show the case from above:The grain of the wood runs out of the back limits of the case to the left.The second image shows how I would insert the replacement veneer.Hope I did get it clear enough!
    Burkhard
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Veneer 001.jpg   Veneer 002.jpg  

  9. #24
    Registered User cazboy's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to repair fire damage? (RE: Burkhard Rasch)

    Quote Originally Posted by Burkhard Rasch View Post
    OK,here we go with a scheme of how to place the veneer:The pics intend to show the case from above:The grain of the wood runs out of the back limits of the case to the left.The second image shows how I would insert the replacement veneer.Hope I did get it clear enough!
    Burkhard
    OK, now I understand! Once again, "a picture is worth a thousand words", as the old saying goes.

    That makes perfect sense. You mean to cut the new veneer in a triangular shape so that the long edge of the cut runs parallel to the grain of the old veneer. Those two drawings spoke volumes to me. I have some work ahead of me.
    Doug Haeussler, NAWCC #0167553 - Prescott Valley, AZ

  10. #25
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    Default Re: How to repair fire damage? (RE: harold bain)

    For the wood repair, clean out the old burned area and use a Minwax product that Home Depot sell for wood repalcement/repair. If you need the exact name, let me know and I will send it to you. It works like Bondo for autos. mix the hardener with the liquid and you get a paste that you can put in the burned area. A few minutes after it starts to harden you can carve it like butter with an exacto knife to the exact shape you need. You can even lower the area where the veneer will go to the correct depth. Try some on a sample piece of wood first though cause it is kinda wierd stuff. One minute it will not even stick where you want it, then for a few seconds it carves like butter, then it gets had as a rock. It will not stain though so you have to plan on veneer repair. For that, get the proper veneer wood, mahogany, walnut, etc, and insert a piece that matches the grain and grain pattern as closely as possible. Put it in with hide glue, also usually available at HD or you local hardware, so if you mess it up you can easily remove it with a little water. Sand ti smoth with a little overlap in the surrounding areas but do not remove excess amounts cause veneer, old and new is very thin. Mathc the stain as close as possible and the touch up the new are and a little surrounding with amber shelac. Must be amber to match what is probably on the clock now. Rub out the area whih 4/0 steel wool or preferably with the new fine scotch bright artificial steel wool, also from HD to match the surrounding surface of the clock. It's more art than science but you can do it with a little practice.

    Burnt amber or burnt sienna oil paints thinned very thin with turpintine can be used as a stain or to paint the inside of the repair so it does not show there either.

    Lamar (scroogega@aol.com)
    NAWCC member.

  11. #26

    Default Re: How to repair fire damage? (RE: cazboy)

    I think you should leave it for historically purposes. Coat the affected area with wax or polish or as a last resort shellac so that it does not deteriorate any further. Remember, antique clocks should not look brand new. Somethings look better with signs of age, like antique clocks, antique furniture and even old Roman coins with a nice patina. In fact, polishing any old coin will destroy it appeal.

  12. #27
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    Default Re: How to repair fire damage? (RE: Chris Radano)

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Radano View Post
    Hi, I think you found a great bargain. If it were me, I clean up the damage, and leave pretty much as is. Looks like there was a candle behind the clock, or something. Not bad, considering the burn is in the back. [snip].
    Good observation... The inverted 'T' could have been
    a home-installed support structure for a small candle
    platform.

    If it's lightweight & dry (as it appears) then dripping
    candle wax and a flame could lead to just this kind of
    damage (and far worse if not quickly caught).

    Yes, seems a silly thing to do, but not the silliest thing
    a human has ever done.

  13. #28

    Default Re: How to repair fire damage? (RE: LloydB)

    Hi Dough!
    How´re You doing with this clock and what´s about with the promised pics of the inside (and perhaps the mvmt. ´cause I´m not familiar with rare american clocks,just interested)
    Burkhard

  14. #29
    Registered User cazboy's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to repair fire damage? (RE: Burkhard Rasch)

    Quote Originally Posted by Burkhard Rasch View Post
    Hi Dough!
    How´re You doing with this clock and what´s about with the promised pics of the inside (and perhaps the mvmt. ´cause I´m not familiar with rare american clocks,just interested)
    Burkhard
    Hello Burkhard,
    I have had to postpone that project (and all others, too) because I kind of had a minor disaster in my workshop. I had a carpet glued to the concrete slab long ago and in my zeal to have a smooth surface for sweeping & finding dropped parts, I pulled up the carpet only to realize the adhesive stayed on the concrete. If I was 30 years younger I'd just torch off the glue and then paint the floor but instead I'm hiring a local floor installer to put in vinyl tile. I should be back in business by next weekend, hopefully.

    Lesson to be learned - think ahead. Well at least I painted my walls and ceiling pure flat white!
    Doug Haeussler, NAWCC #0167553 - Prescott Valley, AZ

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