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  1. #1
    Webgemcanada
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    Default Can you believe this? (By: Webgemcanada)

    Wanted to share this with you collectors.

    Ever wondered if we pay too much for clocks here in North America?
    The link below if for a 1750 longcase with a provonance to die for and sold by Sothebys in Devon, England last week. A friend in the area was watching it for me.
    The stately home it came from was the family home of W.T.Coleridge the poet who wrote "The ancient Mariner" and was a close friend of Wordsworth. Both of these literary giants would have used this to tell when it was "tea time".

    Lord Coleridges Clock

    I guess I should think about biting the bullet and paying the freight from Europe. I know it was only a 30 hour, but wouldn't it be an ultimate trophy.

    Any other stories out there that will make our mouths water?

    Barry

  2. #2
    Webgemcanada
    Guest

    Default Can you believe this?

    Wanted to share this with you collectors.

    Ever wondered if we pay too much for clocks here in North America?
    The link below if for a 1750 longcase with a provonance to die for and sold by Sothebys in Devon, England last week. A friend in the area was watching it for me.
    The stately home it came from was the family home of W.T.Coleridge the poet who wrote "The ancient Mariner" and was a close friend of Wordsworth. Both of these literary giants would have used this to tell when it was "tea time".

    Lord Coleridges Clock

    I guess I should think about biting the bullet and paying the freight from Europe. I know it was only a 30 hour, but wouldn't it be an ultimate trophy.

    Any other stories out there that will make our mouths water?

    Barry

  3. #3
    Webgemcanada
    Guest

    Default Can you believe this? (By: Webgemcanada)

    Link above works now. It has been re-directed to my space.
    Here's an enlargement of the above clock.

    enlarged picture

    Barry

  4. #4
    Registered user. Kevin W.'s Avatar
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    Default Can you believe this? (By: Webgemcanada)

    Nice clock.I would be afraid it might get damaged in transit comming from England.Still a nice piece of history.
    One clock at a time. Kevin West
    http://www.global-horology.com/GHMB/

  5. #5
    Forums Administrator harold bain's Avatar
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    Default Can you believe this? (By: Webgemcanada)

    The shipping cost likely would have been more than the clock sold for. A customer of mine had a tallcase that he inherited shipped from England at a cost of $2,500 Cdn. Being a family treasure, he didn't think twice about paying that much.
    Harold
    harold bain, Member ch 33
    "If it won't "tick",
    let me "tock" to it"

  6. #6

    Default Can you believe this? (By: Webgemcanada)

    Hi Harold -
    It isn't just beauty in the eye of the beholder in this case. This is a beautiful clock. But the history makes it nearly priceless. As with all our old clocks, sometimes I wonder who's hands made it, who wound it up or pulled the chains, who dusted and cleaned it daily in the house. Mine are just the next pair of hands in the chain of caretakers (pun intended).

    I love the idea

  7. #7
    v-regulator
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    Default Can you believe this? (By: Webgemcanada)

    Hello
    As with any collectible,knowing the history
    of previous owners certainly add a touch of pride and mystery to the object of our desire.
    I now own a small clock which has been
    hanging in a Viennese law court for the 100 years or more.
    There is also a sticker near the door
    atttesting to its origin

  8. #8
    Registered user. Mike Phelan's Avatar
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    Default Can you believe this? (By: Webgemcanada)

    Originally posted by Webgemcanada:
    Wanted to share this with you collectors.

    Ever wondered if we pay too much for clocks here in North America?
    The link below if for a 1750 longcase with a provonance to die for and sold by Sothebys in Devon, England last week. A friend in the area was watching it for me.
    The stately home it came from was the family home of W.T.Coleridge the poet who wrote "The ancient Mariner" and was a close friend of Wordsworth. Both of these literary giants would have used this to tell when it was "tea time".

    Barry
    I would say that the price was quite reasonable for a thirty-hour longcase of that time, but I have noticed that British LC clock prices appear to have gone down a bit recently.

    Shipping such a clock would ne a bit if a logistical nightmare, unless the person doing the packing really knew what they were doing! Four parcels required.

    Samuel Taylor Coleridge (not W T) (1772-1834) who wrote "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" and "Kubla Khan" - the latter helped by a bit of opium - was not the Lord Coleridge referred to; they, including the present incumbent, came later.

    Clock looks nice - dummy winding squares, not too unusual on a 30-hour.
    Mike - banned member of the throwaway society. :o

  9. #9
    Registered user. jmclaugh's Avatar
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    Default Can you believe this? (By: Webgemcanada)

    A nice clock with an interesting bit of history and certainly not expensive though the reduced plinth, dummy winding holes on a 30 hour clock are less sought after and the patina on the hood and the trunk don't match (very light on the trunk) would impact the value. Also the chapter ring looks in need of re-silvering and the dial appears pretty dirty. No mention as to if it works or requires a service as again that would impact the price.
    Jonathan.

  10. #10
    Webgemcanada
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    Default Can you believe this? (By: Webgemcanada)

    I guess this field is wide open for me as you folks didn't fall for this clock and it's lineage as I did.
    I have been looking for an old British longcase for some time. One that wouldn't break the bank. Last week, locally, I saw a 1760's 8 day go for $6300. I am retired, so winding each day is not a problem and the extra savings in a 30 hour movement means I can have a couple of them without affecting my income.
    I picked up this oddity last week. It cleaned up nicely but its not 250 years old and it's North American. I fell in love with the looks.
    Seems to be a failing of mine.
    Barry

  11. #11
    kenknox
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    Default Can you believe this? (By: Webgemcanada)

    Nice Clock Barry,

    I have seen simmilar clocks as I searched google. Most seem to have a third finial at the very top. I was wondering if yours might be missing. Is there any evidence of there being one?

    Kenny

  12. #12
    Webgemcanada
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    Default Can you believe this? (By: Webgemcanada)

    Kenny,
    No evidence of a third finial.
    If you do see a similar clock style online can you send me a link?
    Thanks.
    Barry

  13. #13
    Registered user. Mike Phelan's Avatar
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    Default Can you believe this? (By: Webgemcanada)

    Looking at some of the auctions shown on TV, British longcases seem to be something like this:

    8-day
    Brass dial from 1750ish - £1500-2500
    Later painted dial - £1000-1400
    Large Yorkshire 1820-1860 - £800

    Of course, you won't get a Tompion, Quare or Windmills for this!

    Say, 25% less for a 30-hour.
    Mike - banned member of the throwaway society. :o

  14. #14

    Default Can you believe this? (By: Webgemcanada)

    That's interesting, Mike. When they were made, 30 Hr clocks were half, or even less, than 8 day. Jeff Darken told me the prices were inflated for the carriage trade, but that does seem to be a lot. His book probably is responsible for the recent 30 Hr. increase of prices. I guess all tallcases are carriage trade today! Not so long ago, dealers considered them trash, and looted them for their cases and dials, to make up 8-day marriages.
    I have an idea for a device to permit 8-day winding on 30-hr longcases (without trashing them.) Do you think there would be much of a market for this in the UK?
    Barry, there's a minister in New England (New Hampshire?) who imports English longcases for sale in America. He buys a containerload at a time, which substantilly decreases the shipping cost; his ads are in the Mart.

  15. #15
    Registered user. Mike Phelan's Avatar
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    Default Can you believe this? (By: Webgemcanada)

    Originally posted by Bill Ward:
    That's interesting, Mike. When they were made, 30 Hr clocks were half, or even less, than 8 day. Jeff Darken told me the prices were inflated for the carriage trade, but that does seem to be a lot. His book probably is responsible for the recent 30 Hr. increase of prices. I guess all tallcases are carriage trade today! Not so long ago, dealers considered them trash, and looted them for their cases and dials, to make up 8-day marriages.
    In some of the old pre-war clock books, it was recommended that you bought an old 30-hr movement to practise on, for about 2/6 (about 12p / $0.24 today)
    When I looked for one in about 1960, they could be bought for £5 or so; in context, a small car was £500.
    Freely available as the cases and dials were snatched up for 8-day clocks unattractive movements or dials.
    I have an idea for a device to permit 8-day winding on 30-hr longcases (without trashing them.) Do you think there would be much of a market for this in the UK?
    I would not think so, Bill - the percentage of the population that have these clocks would not really object to daily winding.
    Sadly, antique clocks here are really a bit of a minority interest - we are less far-seeing than you in that respect. :frown:
    Barry, there's a minister in New England (New Hampshire?) who imports English longcases for sale in America. He buys a containerload at a time, which substantilly decreases the shipping cost; his ads are in the Mart.
    Now, if he sent a container back full of wooden movement clocks or a spare Ford Model T .....
    Mike - banned member of the throwaway society. :o

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