Goal: $300, Received: $55.00 (18%) Contribute Now
Donate whatever you can or Join the 14,000 other NAWCC members for only $80 (plus $10 for hard copy publications). Check it out here.


NOTICE Notice: This is an old thread. The last post was 3350 days ago. If your post is not directly related to this discussion please consider making a new thread.
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1

    Thumbs up BOOKREVIEW: Saluz: Brief History of Horology (in 5 small Volumes)

    Bookreview

    A Brief History of Horology in 5 small Volumes

    By Eduard C. Saluz [Series Editor]


    Published 2004 to 2007 by the Deutsches Uhrenmuseum, Furtwangen (Germany); saddlestapled, five separately published titles of 40 pages each, many color illustrations, (each volume published in three separate, concurrent editions in German, French and English), available from the DUM giftshop ( http://www.deutsches-uhrenmuseum.de/ ), approx. $7 per volume plus postage, or borrow from the Library & Research Center at the National Watch & Clock Museum.


    Over the last five years the Deutsches Uhrenmuseum (German National Clock Museum) in Furtwangen has set new standards for publishing concise horological museum guides: In 2004, they reissued the classic text by Kahlert/Muehe “ A History of the Blackforest Clock” (ISBN 3-922673-11-2) in a compact format, on 40 pages, richly illustrated with examples from their collection. In 2005, the same format was used to present an overview of their recently expanded wristwatch exhibit under the title “A Brief History of the Wristwatch” (ISBN 3-922673-) by Katrin Hundorf, and in 2006 –under the title “Modern Times” (ISBN -922673-19-8) - a booklet by Johannes Graf, dealing with standard time, electrical horology and time-systems followed. In 2007 “A Brief History of Clock and Time” (ISBN -922673-23-6) by Carmen Haas, dealing with broader time and timekeeping issues in history and society, became the fourth in the series. The fifth and final volume, “A Brief History of the Pocket Watch” (ISBN 3-922673-25-2) by Eduard Saluz has just been released in May 2008, again in three different language versions- to complete the series.

    The newest title follows the common scheme: Each of the five big themes of the series has been broken down into 18 episodes, with a double page spread dedicated to each of these “chapters”: The right left page always is one -or several- images, the right page has a small image, the image captions, and a short text of a few sentences. While this format may appear to be a concession to the current generation of readers raised on comic books it is unquestionably effective – and surprisingly captivating. By presenting 18 small, self contained episodes rather than a drawn out narrative, each booklet nevertheless tells the coherent history of its subject area. In the new pocket watch volume the “chapters” include such themes as: the first pocket watches, form watches, decimal time (during the French revolution), Breguet, American watches, the Proletarian (Roskopf) watch, to name just a few. Many timepieces are illustrated, mostly ones that can be seen in the permanent exhibit at the Deutsches Uhrenmuseum. The booklets thus are also powerful souvenirs of a museum visit. This booklet, like its brethren in the series, does double duty as both a museum guide and an introductory text in its area for a budding collector.

    This reviewer is not aware of any other recent horological publications, in any of the three languages covered, in any of the five subjects, that so skillfully address the information needs of the casual museum visitor, while also providing important and accurate facts of interest to a more inquisitive student of horology.

    Admittedly, these are not scholarly treatises on their subjects, but they are thoughtful collections of important and accurate nuggets of horological information, presented in a manner that is accessible to a broad readership, but without succumbing to the temptation to dumb-down” the content in any way.

    Taken together these series of five booklets form a significant addition to the horological literature, and this reviewer believes there could well be buyers for a combined edition of the five texts, creating a more substantial volume, maybe calling it “A Brief History of Horology”. The Deutsches Uhrenmuseum showed vision – and perseverance – in creating the series, and we can only hope that other leading horological museums around the world will be inspired to do their part to also better share their horological treasures with a broader audience.

    Bookreview by Fortunat Mueller-Maerki, Sussex NJ - May 13, 2008
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------





    [edit=12=1211233782]typo[/edit]
    Fortunat Mueller-Maerki, -Chair NAWCC Library Com./ Editor & Publisher of BHM
    Mem.NAWCC Mus.Coll.Com. / VP, USA Sect. Antiq.Horolog.Soc.

  2. #2

    Default Re: REVIEW: Saluz: Brief History of Horology (in 5 small Volumes) (By: Fortunat Mueller-Maerki)

    Hi Fortunat,

    These sound like very interesting books and I intend getting a copy of each - does the deutsches uhrenmuseum publish other books (booklets) in English too of is this a one off set? Also, and I am now going slightly off topic here but I wonder are there any books relating to Badische Uhrenfabrik (in English) or even more importantly, are there any contact sources that would have access to their trade catalogues. Unlike the American equivalent companies that seem to have reprinted catalogue books (Tran Dy Luy) there seems to be nothing available for European manufacturers - essentially therefore, if I wish to track down a particular clock model by a typical German manufacturer, there seems to be no readily available off-the-shelf sources. You kindly pointed me in the right direction for HAU/HAC some years back - is there a point of contact for other German manufacturers (I mentioned Badische as I acquired one of their models recently and wish to find out more about it) - but the same could be said for the numerous clocks manufactured by among others Thomas Haller, Junghans, Gustav Becker etc.

    Once again, apologies for diverting away fromthe original topic.


  3. #3

    Default Re: REVIEW: Saluz: Brief History of Horology (in 5 small Volumes) (By: Fortunat Mueller-Maerki)

    Quote Originally Posted by centame
    Hi Fortunat,

    ...does the deutsches uhrenmuseum publish other books (booklets) in English too of is this a one off set? ....

    Also, and I am now going slightly off topic here but I wonder are there any books relating to Badische Uhrenfabrik (in English) or even more importantly, are there any contact sources that would have access to their trade catalogues. Unlike the American equivalent companies that seem to have reprinted catalogue books (Tran Dy Luy) there seems to be nothing available for European manufacturers - ....
    As far as I recall this series is the only one they have published in English as well.

    NOBODY has published facsimile editions of ald German clock making companies catalogues, and there also are virtually no libraries in Germany that have copies of them.

    There are three exceptions:

    1. The DUM in Furtwangen has a limited collection of old catalogues in their collection.

    2. The Stadtmuseum Schramberg has a very good collection of of catalogues of local Schramberg manufacturers, mainly HAU and Junghans and if you make an appointment with Ms. Lixfeld the director they are most helpfull if yoiu go there.

    3. The Franziskaner Museum in Villingen which has very few clocks, has a wonderful collection of very early German clockmaker catalogues from the estate of Mr. Spiegelhalter. A few years ago they made microfilms of all of them (probably over 100 historic catalogs).

    fOR THE LAST YEARS i HAVE PERSTERD THEM TO ALLOW nawcc TO ACQUIRE A COPY of these microfilms, and I finally got the copies a few weeks ago in Europe. They are not in Columbia yet but I expect to drop off the 17 reels in August when I next go to Columbia. This will certainly more than double the number of historic German catalogues they have available, but to use oth their paper historic catalog collection or the microfilms you must visit Columbia PA.

    Not the perfect answer to your problem but a big step forward.

    Fortunat Mueller-Maerki, -Chair NAWCC Library Com./ Editor & Publisher of BHM
    Mem.NAWCC Mus.Coll.Com. / VP, USA Sect. Antiq.Horolog.Soc.

  4. #4

    Default Re: REVIEW: Saluz: Brief History of Horology (in 5 small Volumes) (By: Fortunat Mueller-Maerki)

    That is very interesting Fortunat - when you say early trade catalogues, is this referring to mid 19th century or is it turn of the 20th century or say pre-art deco? Also, in your opinion, do you feel that old catalogues might still be stashed away in older clockmaker/jewellers' establishments (not just in Germany itself but perhaps Europeanwide since this was their market). Or were these catalogues only published in very low volumes for travelling sales people to briefly show to the clockmaker/jewellers when choosing stock?

  5. #5

    Default Re: REVIEW: Saluz: Brief History of Horology (in 5 small Volumes) (By: Fortunat Mueller-Maerki)

    Quote Originally Posted by centame
    ... when you say early trade catalogues, is this referring to mid 19th century or is it turn of the 20th century or say pre-art deco? ...

    .... Also, in your opinion, do you feel that old catalogues might still be stashed away in older clockmaker/jewellers' establishments (not just in Germany itself but perhaps Europeanwide since this was their market). Or were these catalogues only published in very low volumes for travelling sales people to briefly show to the clockmaker/jewellers when choosing stock?
    In this context by early trade catalogues I mean anything from the 1870s to World War One. Before 1870 therer was very little industrially made, standardized goods available so catalogues made little sense .


    I doubt that there are substantial numbers of old catalogues (and that applies to all goods, not only horolog, stashed away anywhere.

    Catalogs where (and are) designed to be ephemeral. When the new one comes out the old one gets thrown away. Very few people kept them. Also remember they were mostly not meant for the consumer so the printruns were small.

    The same holds true today, even if the printruns are often huge. Of the 1000s of people who must have been on the mailing list for LaRose how many kept the old one once their newest "Keep Book" arrived? Most of the comapnies that published the cataloges did not accumulate an archive of all the catalogues they sent out.

    For many decades Seth Thomas did keep a catalog archive and ca 2001 they decided to throw the whole thing in a dumpster. NAWCC heard about it and the then Librarian was dispatches with her SUV to Giorgia overnight because they gave us a 36 hour window to come and rescue the archive.


    Librarians and historians know that the only of the big and flashy glossy hardcover books a substantial number survives, of the small saddlestapled publication the bulk gets tossed away after a reatively short time. Often there are more surviving copies of a 200 Dollar fancy book of which only 500 were printed, than there are survisving copies of a cheap catalu of which many thousands were distributed free of charge. Other things beeing equal the cheap stuff is rarer.



    Fortunat Mueller-Maerki, -Chair NAWCC Library Com./ Editor & Publisher of BHM
    Mem.NAWCC Mus.Coll.Com. / VP, USA Sect. Antiq.Horolog.Soc.

  6. #6

    Default Re: REVIEW: Saluz: Brief History of Horology (in 5 small Volumes) (By: Fortunat Mueller-Maerki)

    Thanks for that Fortunat -what manufacturers are included in the Spiegelhalter collection - does it cover a broad geographical region and numerous manufacturers or is it confined to a local region and few manufacturers?

Similar Threads

  1. BOOKREVIEW: Haas/Saluz: A Brief History of Clock and Time
    By Fortunat Mueller-Maerki in forum Horological Books
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-04-2007, 02:37 PM
  2. REVIEW: A Brief History of the Black Forest Clock (For STEVENSON)
    By Fortunat Mueller-Maerki in forum Horological Books
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-18-2006, 06:06 PM
  3. Brief History of BF Clock + Modern Times volumes
    By zepernick in forum Clocks General.
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-17-2006, 04:10 AM
  4. BOOKREVIEW: Hundorf/Saluz: Brief History of the Wristwatch (2005)
    By Fortunat Mueller-Maerki in forum Horological Books
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-24-2005, 12:45 AM
  5. Congrats - The Valjoux 72 with a brief history of Valjoux
    By Marty Rougeaux in forum Wrist Watches
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-21-2001, 03:10 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •