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  1. #1
    Registered user. Sooth's Avatar
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    Default Samuel Terry Clock Restoration

    I'm a bit hesitant to start this new thread. Simply because I don't know how long it will be before the restoration is finally done. This will be a similar, but less detailed thread, like my Boardman & Wells clock restoration thread.

    The clock in question is a nice wooden works clock, made by Samuel Terry. The clock (unlike the Boardman & Wells) has almost all of it's original parts, including a dial, movement, hands, and a case.

    The clock came with reproduction (round) 4lb weights (which I will keep with the clock), and an incorrect brass pendulum bob. I do, however, have a very nice early type bob I will use in this clock.

    The clock will need a fair bit of restoration, and some of the restoration will be different (which is why I'm making another thread, and it will also hopefully keep me motivated).

    The clock needs new top chimneys, a splat, and return pieces. Some of the glue blocks are till in place, and will help to figure out dimensions. The original upper glass got smashed in transit, and I had to remove all the original putty. the bottom glass, although it's old and wavy, is too thick and heavy, and will also be changed.

    Here's the clock "as is".





    The case is very loose, and slightly falling apart. Additional detailed shots can be seen here:

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ryDamage01.jpg
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ryDamage02.jpg
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ryDamage03.jpg
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ryDamage04.jpg
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ryDamage05.jpg
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ryDamage06.jpg
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ryDamage07.jpg
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ryDamage08.jpg

    There are some so-so veneer repairs on the case. Some of these will be redone, but a few of them will be left alone.

  2. #2
    Registered user. Sooth's Avatar
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    Default Re: Samuel Terry Clock Restoration (RE: Sooth)

    This afternoon, I took the clock "apart" by removing the door, and removing the backboard. The rails were already loose.

    Once removed, I very carefully cleaned up the backboard and label. I simply used some good paintbrushes (not too soft, not too stiff), and a soft dry cloth.

    For the soiled parts on the upper wood section, I used a damp cloth.

    You can see the difference here:





    ***

    I also took apart and inspected the movement. It has several broken teeth (mostly the ratchets), and several repairs. Some of the repairs are acceptable, others will be redone properly, as with the Boardman & Wells.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Samuel Terry Clock Restoration (RE: Sooth)

    Sooth, just to chip in with an alternate method, I have used 0000 steel wool and denatured or mineral spirits to clean up the gunk on old backboards, above the label. Doesn't get it "too" clean, but definitely gets the job done
    excellent project with a lot of promise!



  4. #4
    Registered user. Joseph Bautsch's Avatar
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    Default Re: Samuel Terry Clock Restoration (RE: Sooth)

    Sooth - Have you tested the label for acid? If not it might be a good ides. Most of these labels were made from paper that contained acid from the paper making process. It needs to be neutralized. After cleaning I always de-acidify the paper seal it with soluvar, to keep the dirt out, and cover it with acid free clear plastic.

  5. #5
    Registered user. Sooth's Avatar
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    Default Re: Samuel Terry Clock Restoration (RE: Sooth)

    Well, I'm pretty sure that paper from the 1830's is rag paper, which means it's relatively ph balanced, and thus, needs no treatment.

    I believe the early wood fiber paper was only invented in the late 1840's or 1850's.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Samuel Terry Clock Restoration (RE: Sooth)

    dick blick sells a deacidification spray that i use on all my labels, before i cover them with protective plastic.

  7. #7
    Registered user. Sooth's Avatar
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    Default Re: Samuel Terry Clock Restoration (RE: Sooth)

    I've worked on this clock a bit more this past week.

    I had previously dismantled the case, and redid the sides. The original finish was "ok" but not in the best condition (it had bare spots). So, I used a bit of alcohol, and redistributed the finish a little, then I recoated the sides with about 2-3 coats of fresh shellac. Then I followed that with a polish and wax.

    The sides are now much more even, and they are protected, but the finish is still lumpy, uneven and looks old (except for the nice smooth polish).



    This week, I patched the missing piece of veneer in the bottom corner of the base (see second photo), and I also re-stained and recoated the previous repairs, to blend them in a little better.





    I also cut, sanded, fitted, and glued the new veneer patches for the door. The door had previous patches that I did not like very much. They were done with a thin sheet of wood that ran lengthwise, and then a veneer over the top. The patches were not even stained on the back sides, and they were glued with yellow glue. I redid the patches with thick veneer (sapele, which is very close to mahogany), and used hide glue.



    This is after the first coat of stain. It will need another coat for sure.



    Once all my case pieces were ready, and after removing the previous yellow glue from the bottom left side (poor repair attempt by a previous owner), I reassembled the case.

    I placed the door inside the frame to make sure that the case was squared TO THE DOOR.



    Backboard, dial and runners before I reattached them with square nails:



    I also made all the missing trim pieces for the top. I measured the shadows on the top as best as I could, and I also used the spacing between the remaining glue blocks (almost all of them are there), to determine thicknesses for the pieces.

    I also used a few measurements from photos of Samuel Terry clocks (for the height of the front pieces), and used a life-sized "blown-up"photo to cut the splat design.

    The small little chimney tops are the hardest pieces to make, but since I did not need an exact, perfect match (like I did on the Boardman & Wells), I just made them as close as possible, without being too picky.

    The pieces were made in two layers, and I used two different router bits. For the thin cove piece, I used the bottom half of a small roman ogee bit, and for the top curved piece, I used a small round over bit.

    The two cove pieces were cut to about 1/4-3/8" thick, routed, then sanded to the right thickness. The top pieces, are then routed, but left thick (about 1/2"). Glue both pieces together, then crack-fill any small thin gaps in the joint. Once you're ready, cut the pieces to the right width, then cut the whole thing upright in a band saw (but overcut it slightly) then sand it down to the final size with a sander.

    They're quite a pain to make, but they look so nice once they're done.



    The top pieces:



    That's all for now. The next steps will be to glue-on some mahogany veneer to the top chimneys and returns, and to age/stain the pieces on both sides. Once that's done, I can paint and stencil the centre splat. I haven't chosen a pattern yet, but with the lack of available photos, I may design one of my own, or copy a random design from a clock I like.

    I do plan to make the design "faded" like with the Boardman & Wells.

    I also still need to finish the door (restain the patches, then shellac them). Then the movement will need attention.
    [edit=1913=1185683311][/edit]

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Samuel Terry Clock Restoration (RE: Sooth)

    looking good!
    I saw a samuel terry at a recent mart in CT. However the dial and or movement was wrong to the case so i declined. I forget which now. I would have considered it, if it was all original.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Samuel Terry Clock Restoration (RE: Sooth)

    How do I determine if the movement and case/dial are matched. What are the things to look for or is there a book? I'm interested in owning one of these clocks some day and I'd like to eliminate mistakes.
    Going back in time...Vernon

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Samuel Terry Clock Restoration (RE: Sooth)

    well in this particular case, the dial didn't fit the movement, which didn't fit the case!

  11. #11

    Default Re: Samuel Terry Clock Restoration (RE: Sooth)

    Vernon,a good place to "start" is with the book "Eli Terry and the Connecticut Shelf Clock".......and then cruise ebay and search under the clocks for sale by the various manufacturers and study.It is a some what confusing area as there was so much exchange between company's,design change,labeling etc. but a real fun challenge and these clocks are slowly creeping up in value and price.
    Bruce
    Es mejor morir de pie, que vivir de rodillas.....Emiliano Zapata Salazar

  12. #12
    Registered User Kevin W.'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Samuel Terry Clock Restoration (RE: Sooth)

    Sooth, great job on this clock.You are the master of clock restoration, to me.Great pictures and explanations.Thanks very much for sharing this and posting this for us.
    One clock at a time. Kevin West
    http://www.global-horology.com/GHMB/

  13. #13

    Default Re: Samuel Terry Clock Restoration (RE: Sooth)

    Thank you Bruce for the info. These are truely beautiful clocks with a lot of character. Vernon
    Going back in time...Vernon

  14. #14
    Registered user. Sooth's Avatar
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    Default Re: Samuel Terry Clock Restoration (RE: Sooth)

    Thanks for the compliments, guys. And thanks for following the thread.

    As for the clock. It won't look like much until it has a proper tablet. And I happen to have a vast repertoire of original tablet designs to choose from, and a wide assortment of bronzing powders to use.

    The only hard part, as usual, will be mixing paint colours to get accurate, "period correct" shades.

    But I'm not ready to start on the tablets for quite a while. So keep your eyes peeled.
    [edit=1913=1185854353][/edit]

  15. #15
    Registered user. Sooth's Avatar
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    Default Re: Samuel Terry Clock Restoration (RE: Sooth)

    Another small update.

    I've been busy with other clocks (cleaning and repairing a Cuckoo for a friend, finishing up my aunt's clock, and working on the pendulum of my hooded clock), so I haven't done all that much on my poor Sam Terry clock.

    I got the top blocks and side pieces veneered in mahogany. I also got the second coat of stain on the repaired sections of the door.




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