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  1. #1
    BILLIE RAY KIRKLAND
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    Default WHEN TO REPLACE A WORN BUSHING

    HELLO EVERY ONE,I HAVE A QUESTION ON WHEN DO YOU REPLACE THE BUSHINGS IN A CLOCK,HOW MUCH WARE ECT.OR WOULD IT BE BETTER TO REPLACE ALL THE BUSHINGS WHEN YOU HAVE THE MOVEMENT APART? THANKS

  2. #2
    BILLIE RAY KIRKLAND
    Guest

    Default WHEN TO REPLACE A WORN BUSHING (RE: BILLIE RAY KIRKLAND)

    HELLO EVERY ONE,I HAVE A QUESTION ON WHEN DO YOU REPLACE THE BUSHINGS IN A CLOCK,HOW MUCH WARE ECT.OR WOULD IT BE BETTER TO REPLACE ALL THE BUSHINGS WHEN YOU HAVE THE MOVEMENT APART? THANKS

  3. #3
    Registered User Dick Feldman's Avatar
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    Default WHEN TO REPLACE A WORN BUSHING (RE: BILLIE RAY KIRKLAND)

    Billie Ray,
    There are many opinions about when it is time to replace bushings in a clock.
    Here is mine. Since the top wheels in a train are the ones that receive the least energy, they will be ones most prone to increased friction from worn pivot holes. Therefore, I would say to pay special attention to the last wheels and governors.
    As to how much play is allowable--If I can detect lateral movement of the pivot in the hole, it gets bushed. I have heard other opinions giving a percentage of diameter, etc. but I do not like that.
    My reason for being more cautious than most recommendations is that I try not to do a job twice. I have found that cutting corners costs rather than pays. Nobody is happy when a clock has to go back to the repairman for him to do his job over again.
    Best regards,
    Dick

  4. #4
    Registered user.
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    Default WHEN TO REPLACE A WORN BUSHING (RE: BILLIE RAY KIRKLAND)

    Billie Ray
    First, see if the pivots need polishing - more holes may need to be bushed after you have done this. Dick's advice is good; I would add that you also need to take into account whether a pinion or wheel is on the same end of the arbor that you are looking at - wear is less important if this is not the case. Generally, lifting pieces and other levers with worn holes do not cause problems.
    What is 'ware ect'?
    BTW, your Caps Lock appears to be stuck on.
    Mike - banned member of the throwaway society.

  5. #5
    David Holk
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    Default WHEN TO REPLACE A WORN BUSHING (RE: BILLIE RAY KIRKLAND)

    I am in the process of servicing a ST 124. I could not detect wear in the pivot hole of the strike warning wheel arbor. My predecessor had maladjusted the depth of the warning wheel into the fan pinion and there was noise and the train did not run freely. I got the depthing fairly close and there was slight improvement in the running but it was still noisy. I finally found that the teeth of the warning wheel were hitting the arbor of the wheel driving it. I bushed the warning arbor and this corrected the problem. So I guess another good indication that bushing is in order is when a wheel hits its driving arbor.

    David

  6. #6

    Default WHEN TO REPLACE A WORN BUSHING (RE: BILLIE RAY KIRKLAND)

    Phil... not to be picky.. but I assume you meant half the diameter of the pivot... not the pinion!! :&gt

    David
    David Robertson - Kingsland, TX

  7. #7

    Default WHEN TO REPLACE A WORN BUSHING (RE: BILLIE RAY KIRKLAND)

    9/25/04
    I have to disagree a little with Phil Balcomb’s description of how much wear can be tolerated in a clock wheel bearing. What he describes, wear to half the size of a pivot as a criterion for inserting a bushing in the pivot hole, is perhaps fine on some coarse gear trains in inexpensive factory-made clocks. That much wear in many other kinds and ages of clocks would be excessive, and can lead to numerous problems.
    A few years ago I wrote an extensive article on the subject of wear in bearings. It was published in the BULLETIN either in 1999 or 2000, I think. I have quoted two paragraphs below, and I emphasize the next to last sentence of the second paragraph. The first paragraph is part of a longer discussion of determining when a bushing is required. The article is long, and somewhat academic, but does offer an understanding of the overall question of when to insert a bushing. It can be seen on my WEB page at http://home.att.net/~jclosch/articles.htm#bwear .
    “There are several ways to improve a charged bearing. Hjalmar Olsen, one of my teachers, recommended putting a fine five-sided reamer through the pivot holes of French clocks in particular. If the reamer couldn't be made to revolve with light pressure, a bushing was probably needed anyway, because the hole is worn out-of-round. If the reamer scraped a slight amount out of the bearing, including the abrasive-charged area, it is true that the bearing hole would be enlarged by one or even two thousandths of an inch. In most cases it doesn't matter! All except the charged point in the bearing was doing nothing to help the clock run, and the depthing of the train is effected only by the amount the abrasive part of the bearing was enlarged. The pivot and its wheel will have a more nearly permanent location in an abrasive-free hole than in one immediately lapping or scoring the pivot smaller.
    “ There are two precautions required when a bearing hole is reamed. First, it is necessary to be honest about the looseness of the hole. The above rationale cannot justify excessively loose bearings. A combination of experience, understanding of depthing, and good judgment is needed. Second, if a bearing is excessively loose, the oil in the bearing will not be retained by capillary attraction, and it may run away from the pivot. Be careful when using this technique to “clean” pivot holes. “ Jcl

  8. #8

    Default WHEN TO REPLACE A WORN BUSHING (RE: BILLIE RAY KIRKLAND)

    The only thing I will add to this is when it comes to wood clock movements with wood gears it is important to bush loose. I only repair out of round bushing and leave a good amount of play to allow the wood to expand and contract with temp and humidity. Otherwise I have found that it may run in the winter when it is cold and dry but will be locked up tight in the summer when it is hot and humid.
    William

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