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  1. #1
    Mike Kearney
    Guest

    Default Chicago School of Watchmaking Course

    "Master Watchmaking. A Modern, Complete, Practical Course", by Thomas B. Sweazey and Byron G. Sweazey.

    This review is of the course materials of the home study course run by the Chicago School of Watchmaking. I believe the home study course was available from about 1947 until sometime after 1963, although the Chicago School of Watchmaking was founded in 1908. The materials I have are copyright 1963.

    This course consists of 33 lesson books of about 25 pages each. The lesson books consist of text with photos and diagrams, self test reviews with answers, and 'job sheets' which summarize various procedures.

    The lesson books are:
    1. Fundamental Principles, Equipment, Casing
    2. Crowns, Stems, Sleeves and Bows
    3. Fitting Watch Crystals and Watch Attachments for Practice and Profit
    4. Nomenclature and Sizes of Watches
    5. Mainsprings in Watches
    6. Motor and Jeweled Barrels
    7. Selecting the Mainspring
    8. Assempling Watches
    9. Winding and Setting Mechanisms
    10. Cleaning Watches
    11. Timing, Rating and Regulation
    12. Factory Set Train Jewels
    13. Factory Balance Hole Jewels and Roller Jewels
    14. Friction Jeweling
    15. Replacing Factory Balance Staffs
    16. Truing Balance Wheels
    17. Poising Balance Wheels
    18. Colleting and Truing Hairsprings
    19. The Overcoil Hairspring
    20. Fitting Hairsprings in Watches
    21. Principles of the Lever Escapement
    22. Principles of the Lever Escapement (cont.)
    23. Types of Escapements
    24. Drawing the Lever Escapement
    25. Drawing the Lever Escapement (cont.)
    26. Matching the Escapement
    27. Tools - Hardening and Tempering
    28. The Lathe
    29. Lathe Work
    30. Lathe Work (cont.)
    31. Lathe Work (cont.)
    32. Practical Job Methods
    33. Electronic Timing Machines (Watch-Master)
    34. Electronic Timing Machines (Time-O-Graph and others)

    There's also a problems and solutions review guide, several pages of instructions for overhauling the Universal Geneve chronograph, and an illustrated guide of tools of the trade. The whole course is easily 700 pages or more.

    I've not met anyone who learned the trade from this course. I would certainly be interested in hearing opinions from anyone who did. It contains good quality material with a good level of detail. If it was ever possible to learn watch repair from a home study course, this would have been the one to take. I've learned things from the material that I haven't seen in the Fried or DeCarle books.

    If you can add anything to the above info, please do!

    Regards,
    Mike

    [This message was edited by Mike Kearney on September 03, 2003 at 17:52.]

  2. #2
    Mike Kearney
    Guest

    Default Chicago School of Watchmaking Course (RE: Mike Kearney)

    "Master Watchmaking. A Modern, Complete, Practical Course", by Thomas B. Sweazey and Byron G. Sweazey.

    This review is of the course materials of the home study course run by the Chicago School of Watchmaking. I believe the home study course was available from about 1947 until sometime after 1963, although the Chicago School of Watchmaking was founded in 1908. The materials I have are copyright 1963.

    This course consists of 33 lesson books of about 25 pages each. The lesson books consist of text with photos and diagrams, self test reviews with answers, and 'job sheets' which summarize various procedures.

    The lesson books are:
    1. Fundamental Principles, Equipment, Casing
    2. Crowns, Stems, Sleeves and Bows
    3. Fitting Watch Crystals and Watch Attachments for Practice and Profit
    4. Nomenclature and Sizes of Watches
    5. Mainsprings in Watches
    6. Motor and Jeweled Barrels
    7. Selecting the Mainspring
    8. Assempling Watches
    9. Winding and Setting Mechanisms
    10. Cleaning Watches
    11. Timing, Rating and Regulation
    12. Factory Set Train Jewels
    13. Factory Balance Hole Jewels and Roller Jewels
    14. Friction Jeweling
    15. Replacing Factory Balance Staffs
    16. Truing Balance Wheels
    17. Poising Balance Wheels
    18. Colleting and Truing Hairsprings
    19. The Overcoil Hairspring
    20. Fitting Hairsprings in Watches
    21. Principles of the Lever Escapement
    22. Principles of the Lever Escapement (cont.)
    23. Types of Escapements
    24. Drawing the Lever Escapement
    25. Drawing the Lever Escapement (cont.)
    26. Matching the Escapement
    27. Tools - Hardening and Tempering
    28. The Lathe
    29. Lathe Work
    30. Lathe Work (cont.)
    31. Lathe Work (cont.)
    32. Practical Job Methods
    33. Electronic Timing Machines (Watch-Master)
    34. Electronic Timing Machines (Time-O-Graph and others)

    There's also a problems and solutions review guide, several pages of instructions for overhauling the Universal Geneve chronograph, and an illustrated guide of tools of the trade. The whole course is easily 700 pages or more.

    I've not met anyone who learned the trade from this course. I would certainly be interested in hearing opinions from anyone who did. It contains good quality material with a good level of detail. If it was ever possible to learn watch repair from a home study course, this would have been the one to take. I've learned things from the material that I haven't seen in the Fried or DeCarle books.

    If you can add anything to the above info, please do!

    Regards,
    Mike

    [This message was edited by Mike Kearney on September 03, 2003 at 17:52.]

  3. #3
    Mike Kearney
    Guest

    Default Chicago School of Watchmaking Course (RE: Mike Kearney)

    Gene, thanks so much for your followup on the course. It's great to hear it worked for you. Do you happen to know when they stopped offering the correspondence course, or about the missing lesson 23?

    Regards,
    Mike

  4. #4

    Default Chicago School of Watchmaking Course (RE: Mike Kearney)

    Gene,

    There is a lesson 23 entitled "Types of Escapements". There is also a Lesson 35 entitled Problems and Solutions (Illustrated)".

    I am missing 24, 25, 32, 34. We should get together and complete our courses.

    Don

  5. #5
    Mike Kearney
    Guest

    Default Chicago School of Watchmaking Course (RE: Mike Kearney)

    I have the Problems and Solutions guide as well. As I recall, it's labeled '333' for some reason.

    Hey, I take it back, I do have lesson 23, 'Types of Escapements'. The way it was copied it's in the back of lesson 22.

    Regards,
    Mike

    [This message was edited by Mike Kearney on September 03, 2003 at 17:51.]

    [This message was edited by Mike Kearney on September 03, 2003 at 17:53.]

  6. #6

    Default Chicago School of Watchmaking Course (RE: Mike Kearney)

    I have been fortunate enough to locate the course, however, I am missing lessons 29, 30, and 31. Is there someone willing to copy theirs and send me the missing pages? I'd certainly appreciate it!! BTW, I think what I've read of it so far is very good!
    Jay Thomas
    NAWCC #0156966

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