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Thread: Hide Glue 101

  1. #31

    Default Hide Glue 101 (By: craig)

    Hmmm; I wonder if it could be frozen?

  2. #32
    P Schlenker
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    Default Hide Glue 101 (By: craig)

    I've ordered a bottle of Titebond liquid hide glue from Rockler. I intend to use it on some small veneer overlays on a clock that I'm making. I'm unfamiliar with the liquid variety. It's advertised as, ready to use ... no heat.

    My question: Is the liquid type hide glue REVERSIBLE? If so, would it be accomplished with heat? Moisture? Both? Or is it non-reversible?

    P.S.

  3. #33
    P Schlenker
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    Default Hide Glue 101 (By: craig)

    I've found the answer to my question at Titebond's website.

    "Titebond Liquid Hide provides superior creep-resistance, offers excellent sandability and is unaffected by finishes. Its sensitivity to moisture allows for easy disassembly of parts, a critical benefit in antique restoration or the repair of musical instruments."
    Application temperature: Above 50 degrees F.
    Assembly time after glue application: 10 minutes (70 degrees F @ 50 percent RH)

    P.S.

  4. #34
    Registered user. Scottie-TX's Avatar
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    Default Hide Glue 101 (By: craig)

    I gather that you've never used it. I'm correct. New to it a few mos. ago, INDEED I'm a believer. You can use it as a filler. It is the ONLY glue that won't cause a stain on your finish. If a little oozes out of the joint a wet rag will quickly eradicate it. I feel it does have it's limits as a STRONG glue. I could be wrong. Often I am. I believe there are other glues that are stronger but also have undesirable qualities associated with their strength.

  5. #35
    P Schlenker
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    Default Hide Glue 101 (By: craig)

    Scottie,

    I've never used the LIQUID form of hide glue, only the HOT hide glue (see my earlier post in this thread).

    As I understand it:
    1. HOT hide glue is (re-)activated by heat and moisture.
    2. LIQUID hide glue is (re-)activated by moisture only.

    I was taught in my college courses using HOT glue, to let the "squeeze out" harden and then chip it off with a sharp wood chisel -- if you try to wipe it off, it forces the glue into the grain, which affects the staining.
    It makes sense that wiping the LIQUID glue with a damp cloth would work best.

    Actually, what I'm trying to do right now is glue a couple of small veneer overlays on the face of a small tambour shaped clock that I'm making. I know "nothing" about gluing veneer overlays! Perhaps there is a better glue to use for this purpose? I have two beautiful book-paged walnut burl overlays cut out and ready to attach to the front of the clock. "Squeeze out" is not an option. It's a one-shot deal!

    Any sugestions would be very much appreciated.

    P.S.

  6. #36
    Registered user. Scottie-TX's Avatar
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    Default Hide Glue 101 (By: craig)

    Apparently there are noticeable differences between hot and liquid hide glue. I've never used hot. One property of liquid hide glue is that it does NOT stain the surface when it enters the grain - a tribute to it's use as a grain filler. I recently finished some very tedious veneer patching and replacement of purling. I did ALL of it with liquid hide glue and it turned out great. With it I could do what is not possible with any other glue - just literally pour it on and wipe it off. It even helped close the seams. Now if I'm concerned about second operations staining the bare wood, what I do is lay down a couple layers of shellac to seal it first. Then do the patch or whatever because it can be removed from the finish - not the wood.

  7. #37
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    Default Hide Glue 101 (By: craig)

    Recently a respondent on another topic board replied with respect to the use of ELMERS wood glue that was to hold a piece under stress - that is it had to be clamped to retain it's position - he responded, "Cod, MA posted 03-01-2006 07:40 AM
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Uh oh. PVA adhesives (Elmer's) creep with applied load, and are not suitable for structural uses because of that.
    I haven't gotten a response to my question asking what he meant. What's your opinion? What was he saying?

  8. #38
    P Schlenker
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    Default Hide Glue 101 (By: craig)

    I'm confused, too.
    Elmer's carpenter glue, the yellow one, is an aliphatic resin -- the white one is a poly-vinyl acetate (PVAc) -- don't know what the "c" means. I can only assume he means that the white glue creeps under unequally applied pressure. Structual

  9. #39
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    Default Hide Glue 101 (By: craig)

    Yep; The yellow one. I figgered maybe Poly Vinyl Adhesive. We'll see. I glued it originally with hide glue, clamped it for 24hrs. and next day released the clamp. 10 secs. later "SNAP". Bond broken. So I got serious. I LOADED it with ELMERS literally pouring it into the joint hoping the glue would form a gusset in the gap making up for the lack of contact area available for the piece which was VERY minimal - perimeter contact - about an eighth inch. We'll see. My major concern is success. A conical shaped grille held against it's will to return to it's 5 degree warp will later crack because it can't overcome the bond of Elmer's Glue.

  10. #40
    Registered user. Chris Radano's Avatar
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    Default Hide Glue 101 (By: craig)

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">A conical shaped grille held against it's will to return to it's 5 degree warp will later crack because it can't overcome the bond of Elmer's Glue. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    I guess that's when you use hide glue as a crack filler.

    I have used Titebond carpenter's glue on some of my clocks before learning about hide glue. In one instance, I glued the top of a weight regulator. The top had already warped very slightly- enough to break the old glue bond, but not enough to be a visual distraction. So when I repaired it with modern glue, the bond only occurred where wood contact was made (even when clamped). How much more will the wood move? I suspect the wood did the majority of it's warping in the first 100 years.

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> I LOADED it with ELMERS literally pouring it into the joint hoping the glue would form a gusset in the gap making up for the lack of contact area available for the piece which was VERY minimal - perimeter contact - about an eighth inch </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    With glue, less is more. Maybe it is better to adhere the wood that contacts, then fill?

  11. #41
    Registered user. waricks's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hide Glue 101 (By: craig)

    WOW - this is a gem of an old post. I really learned a lot about glue here.


  12. #42

    Smile Re: Hide Glue 101 (By: TEACLOCKS)

    never mind, my mind went south i think, or maybe west?

    Stormy

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