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  1. #1
    sep
    Guest

    Default Striking too Fast. Suggestions (By: sep)

    Hi
    I am working on a French movement that is striking too fast.
    I do not post here but I lurk quite a bit and the list I am usually on has stopped running at the moment. I did a search for this subject but got nothing on this list that closely matches the problem I am having. I am working on a French silk thread movement that is striking about twice as fast as it should. All parts are there including the screw-in spring rod that keeps the hammer arbor hitting tight. The fly looks original. I did notice that there was one very slightly sloppy pivot hole. I had rebushed several on the strike side and all gears mesh very well. My question is when fast striking occurs with a French movement what is the check list for finding the problem? Thanks for suggestions
    Stephen Phillips
    (MAIL]sep4@charter.net[/EMAIL]

  2. #2
    sep
    Guest

    Default Striking too Fast. Suggestions

    Hi
    I am working on a French movement that is striking too fast.
    I do not post here but I lurk quite a bit and the list I am usually on has stopped running at the moment. I did a search for this subject but got nothing on this list that closely matches the problem I am having. I am working on a French silk thread movement that is striking about twice as fast as it should. All parts are there including the screw-in spring rod that keeps the hammer arbor hitting tight. The fly looks original. I did notice that there was one very slightly sloppy pivot hole. I had rebushed several on the strike side and all gears mesh very well. My question is when fast striking occurs with a French movement what is the check list for finding the problem? Thanks for suggestions
    Stephen Phillips
    (MAIL]sep4@charter.net[/EMAIL]

  3. #3
    Dave Robertson (no relati
    Guest

    Default Striking too Fast. Suggestions (By: sep)

    I'm not sure what kind of fly it uses, but in most cases the blade will detach from the arbor by sliding off, then the tension can be adjusted by bending whatever part of the blade makes contact in the center with the arbor. Most of the french movements I've ever worked on have a governor that is adjusted in that fashion.

  4. #4
    Registered User doug sinclair's Avatar
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    Default Striking too Fast. Suggestions (By: sep)

    Sep,

    A lot of French clocks use a small strip of what might appear to be watch mainspring as a brake on the governor. There is usually a "neck", or groove cut around the arbor about the middle, where that brake spring goes. Is your clock like that? Sure sounds as though the governor fan is too loose.

  5. #5
    Dave Robertson (no relati
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    Default Striking too Fast. Suggestions (By: sep)

    thanks Doug,

    I knew there was a good word for that little strip, I just didn't know what it was. A brake! My boss tought me clock repair and he was tought by another fellow so some of the terminology is fuzzy for me. That's the problem Sep, in some cases depending on how old the clock is, that little brake strip can be worn to a point where it won't provide proper tension. I've ran into that a few times, if I remember correctly we used a small strip of an old mainspring from 30 hour clock to replace it.

  6. #6
    Registered User LaBounty's Avatar
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    Default Striking too Fast. Suggestions (By: sep)

    Hi Sep-

    As already mentioned, the likely culprit for a run-away strike is a loose fan.

    A small strip of suspension spring (0.003" - 0.004" thick) is what I'd use if you are missing the butterfly tension spring on your French clock or it is worn beyond tolerance.

    Good luck with it!

  7. #7
    Dave Robertson (no relati
    Guest

    Default Striking too Fast. Suggestions (By: sep)

    that's a better idea, LaBounty is right, as I remember that spring material was very tough and we had a bear of a time getting it adjusted to the right tension, sus. spring material would be much easier and easier to cut to size.

  8. #8
    sep
    Guest

    Default Striking too Fast. Suggestions (By: sep)

    I will check the fan again but unfortunately, The last time I checked it the tension spring was sound and tight. I am thinking it may be the loose pivot hole, but am not sure at the moment.
    I will let this thread know what I come up with in the next few days here.
    Thanks for the replies!
    Stephen

  9. #9
    Dave Robertson (no relati
    Guest

    Default Striking too Fast. Suggestions (By: sep)

    yeah, with such small pivots and arbors/pinions it would be relatively easy for the pivot on the pinion end to get worn out so far that it doesn't mesh at all, but I rarely do I see a french movement that worn.

  10. #10
    Peter
    Guest

    Default Striking too Fast. Suggestions (By: sep)

    Hi

    Just to add my thoughts.

    Firstly have you compared this strike rate with others - In my experience many French clocks do strike at a fast rate compared to many other clocks. In particular the small movements such as the round movements and carriage clocks.

    Secondly: Assuming the wheels or pinions have not been replaced with those of different ratios, there are only two things that govern the strike rate - power and resistance.

    If the fly is correct and tensioned properly (correct resistance) and the wheels are not slipping, that only leaves a power problem - is the spring correct? It may be that the spring has been replaced with a more powerful one at some time.

    Good luch with it

  11. #11
    Registered User doug sinclair's Avatar
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    Default Striking too Fast. Suggestions (By: sep)

    Stephen,

    One must take into consideration the strength of the mainspring for the strike side, as well. Did you replace it? Did you measure it when you had it out of the mainspring barrel? These are usually about .028 mm in strength.

  12. #12
    Peter G Mitchell
    Guest

    Default Striking too Fast. Suggestions (By: sep)

    Hi Stephen,
    On most french clocks I work on there is an eccentric bush on the fly, this allows you to adjust the depth of mesh on the fly pinion, this will regulate the speed of the strike, the bush usually has a small "tab"on it, I put a drop of oil on the outside of the bush then grip the tab with flat pliers and turn.
    Peter

  13. #13
    sep
    Guest

    Default Striking too Fast. Suggestions (By: sep)

    Hi Peter
    Thank you for the comment but I have already adjusted the fly to such an extent that when the striking occurs I hear the gear and pinion making considerable chatter. That's not good. If I back off any on the eccentric bush the striking is even faster. The movement did have some odd repairs that I fixed from a previous worker. I measure my mainsprings with a micrometer and a caliper, so maybe the previous repairer missed the measurement and I am looking at a strong mainspring here.
    Stephen

  14. #14
    sep
    Guest

    Default Striking too Fast. Suggestions (By: sep)

    Hi people
    Here's my follow up on the French movement that was striking too fast. I rebushed one hole I must have overlooked previously. I said I might need to do that in the first letter I wrote here. I also checked the old springs' thicknesses and widths. The time side was .30mm thick and the strike side was .30mm thick. These are thicknesses I first bought to replace the old springs. I then ordered again a .28mm thick spring for the strike side to replace the new .30mm. The barrel will handle a 19mm wide spring but I replaced with a 18mm wide spring. I also put a drop of shellac on the fly so it would hold and not shift when turning. All this done and the strike still sounds too fast (but it has slowed). The barrel is 30mm inside diameter. Should I go to a lower spring strength yet again? Should I forget about it and think the movement was designed to have a fast strike? Some of these french clocks do have faster bell strikes. Should I even think that one of the arbors was a replacement and just strike it up as repaired? forgive the pun!
    Stephen Phillips

  15. #15

    Default Striking too Fast. Suggestions (By: sep)

    Stephen,

    I can't tell if you are planning on leaving the fan stuck on with shellac. If so.. don't. It needs to be able to turn on the arbor when it stops sudenly. Otherwise you will get accelerated wear and possibly damage to the upper part of the strike train.
    David Robertson - Kingsland, TX

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