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  1. #1
    Registered User Jim DuBois's Avatar
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    Default Recent Additions, Ives 30 hr Hour Glass and Ives 30 day drop octagon

    Recently we acquired two clocks that may be of interest to wagon spring clock folks, as well as others. These two clocks represent the wide range of clocks made or heavily influenced by Joseph Ives, circa 1840-1855. The 30 hr Hour glass wagon spring also has fusees to equalize the available power from fully wound to unwound.

    The 30 day time only drop octagon clock uses intermediate wheels and cam action to more or less do the same. The drop octagon clock movement is one that is frequently removed from its case and displayed as a skeleton clock. It is indeed highly attractive out of the case, more so than concealed in a fairly mundane case. The movements were also used in the so called London cases, as well as gallery clock cases. There are also shelf clocks in gilt cases that use the same movement shown in the photos below.

    The hour glass clock is nearly unique in American clock making with the combination of the wagon spring and the fusees. But, Da Vinci drew up a very similar mechanism in or about 1480.....so never say never, and unique may need redefinition? Samual Rogers also used a similar approach in about 1790.

    The 30 day wagon spring movement is found in all these cases, shown in photo 1 and photo 7....except of course the Hour glass case which features a rather unusual movement, used only in this case and stangely enough was also modified to be used as an 8 day movement in an ogee case..
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  2. #2

    Default Re: Recent Additions, Ives 30 hr Hour Glass and Ives 30 day drop octagon (By: Jim DuBois)

    Thems is nice!

    RM

  3. #3

    Default Re: Recent Additions, Ives 30 hr Hour Glass and Ives 30 day drop octagon (By: rmarkowitz1_cee4a1)

    why wagon spring?
    Nick, lots to learn, late starter.

  4. #4
    Registered User Jim DuBois's Avatar
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    Default Re: Recent Additions, Ives 30 hr Hour Glass and Ives 30 day drop octagon (By: novicetimekeeper)

    Quote Originally Posted by novicetimekeeper View Post
    why wagon spring?
    They are called "wagon spring" due to their rather unusual power method. They were pretty much the work of Joseph Ives of Bristol CT. He developed them starting about 1824 continuing through about 1860. The often carry the names of other companies but they were originally patented and or developed by Ives. They are also called lever spring, or accelerating spring.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Recent Additions, Ives 30 hr Hour Glass and Ives 30 day drop octagon (By: Jim DuBois)

    Ah I see it now, a leaf spring.
    Nick, lots to learn, late starter.

  6. #6
    Registered User George Nelson's Avatar
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    Default Re: Recent Additions, Ives 30 hr Hour Glass and Ives 30 day drop octagon (By: novicetimekeeper)

    Yes, a leaf spring! I believe the term "wagon spring" is due to the fact that the springs look quite a bit like the spring setup used on wagons of the time. In fact, the springs even resemble the ones used on cars of the 50s and 60s.

    Jim has done us all a huge favor in sharing these clocks with us. I personally have never seen any like these in person, and look forward to learning more about them. Thanks, Jim!

    George Nelson
    Time is a great story teller... Irish Proverb

  7. #7

    Default Re: Recent Additions, Ives 30 hr Hour Glass and Ives 30 day drop octagon (By: George Nelson)

    Initially I was looking at the picture of the hourglass one so I didn't see it.

    Leaf springs were used on cars and vans here all through the 70s and beyond I think, and on trucks much later. I left the industry a few years ago but they were still in use when I did.
    Nick, lots to learn, late starter.

  8. #8
    Registered User Jim DuBois's Avatar
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    Default Re: Recent Additions, Ives 30 hr Hour Glass and Ives 30 day drop octagon (By: novicetimekeeper)

    The drop front octagonal clock is by far the more common version of the 30 day time only wagon spring movement. Following a dispute between Ives and Adkins in 1855 the drop front, the London case, and the gallery clocks were all offered with 30 day fusee power as Ives refused to allow Adkins to use any of his inventions any further.

    Why the very fancy cast frame was hidden away as they were remains a bit of a mystery in the wagon spring models. The 30 hr hour glass clocks are quite rare, perhaps a dozen or so known to exist. The 3 fancy gold leafed / gilt models approach unique. We know of 2 of the more plain gilt clock, one was just sold last week in an auction in upstate NY. The other 2 fancy cased clocks are the only known examples, by me at least. I would suspect at least a couple more to be someplace....

    I was pleased to acquire the drop front and the hour glass clocks in the last month. The clock budget is sadly in the arrears and may remain so for a bit. There are a large number of really nice clocks available these days...but turning them over for a profit is not so likely now....

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