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  1. #1

    Default Austrian carriage clock - where to get bells?

    Hi

    Here is my latest acquisition, an Austrian grande sonnerie carriage clock, which I am assuming by the size of the barrels probably only runs for one day (it's not running right now). You can see from the pictures of the base that the bells are missing, and overall the clock needs a fair bit of work to clean it up and get it running - judging by the state of some of my other clocks, that could take a while...

    My question is where could I find a set of nested bells for the clock?

    I believe that the three hammers you can see in the base should strike the alarm and hours on one bell and the quarters on a higher bell. The clock is a "standard" size corniche and is around 13cm / 5 in high without handle.

    If anyone else has a similar clock, I'd love to see pictures of the base, with the bells in place.

    For those who aren't familiar with these clocks, you can see from the back that the clock has a mid 19th century Austrian layout, including separately wound barrels for the hours and quarters, which is quite different to the French layout. There is no option for Strike / silent or grande/petite sonnerie - usually this would be in the base on a French grande sonnerie clock. Some of the French and Swiss sonnerie clocks with bells in the base have a lever on the backplate, or on the front of the dial, to provide this option, but it doesn't seem to be a usual feature on Austrian clocks.

    The plates are also much closer together than is usual with French clocks. As a consequence, the platform escapement overhangs a long way, even though it is original to the clock, and the winding arbors for the barrels project out further than they do in French clocks..

    I am assuming that this clock would have been made some time around the 1860s, judging by the case style and movement layout, but there is no maker's name nor any marks or numbering on the movement that I can see right now.

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Austrian carriage clock - where to get bells? (By: zedric)

    Hello,
    Please be so kind and share the pictures of the platform escapement and rear door opened...

  3. #3

    Default Re: Austrian carriage clock - where to get bells? (By: Kinpol)

    Quote Originally Posted by Kinpol View Post
    Hello,
    Please be so kind and share the pictures of the platform escapement and rear door opened...
    Here you are - both from the top and from the underneath of the escapement. As you can see, the maker seems to have used an escapement that was presumably from a standard escapement maker and designed to fit a French clock, so there is overhang as the plates on this clock are much closer together than on a French clock. Also, you can see from this angle the winding squares project much further out, as the case has the "standard" dimensions for a corniche.
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  4. #4

    Default Re: Austrian carriage clock - where to get bells? (By: Kinpol)

    This is a photo of another clock I owned a couple of years back - the clock has the nested bells (which I am hoping to source) - this one comes from the Franche Comte region, or possibly over the border in Switzerland, and would be from around the 1850s.

    Like the Austrian clock, there are hammers for the hours, quarters and alarm. the You can see on the backplate of this one the Grande Sonnerie/Petite Sonnerie/Silence adjuster, which is a adjusted by key, an unusual feature.

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