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Thread: Mauthe Mystery

  1. #16
    Registered user. MartinM's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mauthe Mystery (By: dAz57)

    I'd try un-bending that last (Top in the last picture) loop to make it align with the others. The way it is now, it's interfering with the ability of the other loops of the spring to grasp the shaft.
    Spring clutches are pretty simple, they just need to be a nice consistent wind and slightly smaller than the shaft they are slipped over. The shaft needs to be clean and straight with no taper.
    Living life at eight beats per minute.

  2. #17

    Default Re: Mauthe Mystery

    The spring was very hard to remove, so I'm thinking it's snug enough. Can you be a bit more explicit in how the thing is supposed to work, dAz? The loop end apparently is supposed to have a threaded pin that holds it in place. There are two threaded holes where they would originally have fit. I made a couple (2.5mm threads) that seem to serve the purpose.
    A man with a clock always knows the time. A man with two clocks is never sure.

  3. #18
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    Default Re: Mauthe Mystery (By: shutterbug)

    If it is like the German time bomb, turning one way, the spring drags
    on the shaft and tightens with a little back turn.
    It isn't the end that digs in. One wonders if the spring was swapped with
    the wrong direction of turn.
    Each turn should be snug. Winding should loosen the spring.
    Which way does this arbor turn when winding?
    Tinker Dwight

  4. #19

    Default Re: Mauthe Mystery (By: Tinker Dwight)

    Quote Originally Posted by Tinker Dwight View Post
    Which way does this arbor turn when winding?
    Tinker Dwight
    I'm not quite sure yet, Tinker. Right now it free wheels either way. I'll have to study it a bit more today and let you know.
    A man with a clock always knows the time. A man with two clocks is never sure.

  5. #20
    Registered user. MartinM's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mauthe Mystery (By: shutterbug)

    it can't work correctly with that one deformed loop.
    Actually, it looks like both ends of the spring have a deformed loop.
    Here's a quick reference for how they are typically used
    http://www.tinyclutch.com/spring-clutches.htm
    Living life at eight beats per minute.

  6. #21

    Default Re: Mauthe Mystery (By: MartinM)

    Thanks, Martin. This one does not have a double hub though, which seems to be a requirement of the style you linked to.
    A man with a clock always knows the time. A man with two clocks is never sure.

  7. #22

    Default Re: Mauthe Mystery

    Quote Originally Posted by chimeclockfan View Post
    Well here's a catalog photo of what is probably the same movement you're saddled with. They are fairly common and were used by a plethora of case makers in America and Germany.

    Check if the strike silence lever has any correlation to the lone worm gear. This toggles the chime and strike into warning so it remains completely silent. The other lever just bars off the chime hammers so the clock still strikes the hours (and albeit silently, activates each quarter hour).
    That does look like the movement, Justin, but with some differences. The left lever does not have an extension for an actuating wire. Nothing is in proximity to the worm gear that can utilize it in any way. The right lever will stop both the chime and strike sequence. This one also has a pulley system that I'm not sure is original. This is the same movement I posted before that the former "repairman" cut the chime main wheel out of the plate with a hacksaw! I could not get the plates hot enough to a better repair, so left his handy work as part of the clock's history.
    A man with a clock always knows the time. A man with two clocks is never sure.

  8. #23
    Registered user. MartinM's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mauthe Mystery

    My guess about the one you have there is that the hub goes through a plate or the end of a spring barrel and then the spring is installed and one end is secured to the plate/barrel via the loop that hangs off the main body of the spring. This would allow the hub to spin in one direction, only, as it relates to the plate/barrel.
    this one has apparently been tweaked by someone to try to improve the grab friction while not understanding how the device is supposed to actually work.
    The way it is, now, it can only provide a slight amount of drag on the hub and never be able to tighten-down and grab on it.
    Living life at eight beats per minute.

  9. #24

    Default Re: Mauthe Mystery (By: MartinM)

    Another odd thing is that the screws you see on the hub are not long enough to hold the hub to the arbor. I'm still baffled
    A man with a clock always knows the time. A man with two clocks is never sure.

  10. #25
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    Default Re: Mauthe Mystery (By: shutterbug)

    It doesn't require the double hub. The German time bomb doesn't
    have a double hub. It just has the arbor and the spring.
    Tinker Dwight

  11. #26
    Registered user. MartinM's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mauthe Mystery (By: Tinker Dwight)

    Quote Originally Posted by Tinker Dwight View Post
    It doesn't require the double hub. The German time bomb doesn't
    have a double hub. It just has the arbor and the spring.
    Tinker Dwight
    Yes. Another popular configuration is an inner and an outer hub where the inner is grabbed by the wrap-clutch-spring and the outer is affixed to the other end of the spring via a tang of some kind on the spring. Just as in the GTB.
    Living life at eight beats per minute.

  12. #27
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    Default Re: Mauthe Mystery (By: MartinM)

    The double hub assumes both ends of the spring turn.
    This way if the shafts turn fast, the spring is contained.
    It just needs one end attached and the spring must drag
    enough to cause the spring to wind tighter.
    This is a similar concept as the toy called Chinese handcuffs
    ( only that is linear rather than rotational ).
    Tinker Dwight

  13. #28

    Default Re: Mauthe Mystery

    Here's what I discovered so far. I replaced the short screws with longer ones that will tighten against the arbor. This configuration allows the time side to wind CCW (from the front), and holds it from turning CW. Odd thing, but it works now at least. I'll play with the strike side later. Notice my home made post to hold the loop too. I used a couple pieces of a cuckoo perch wire.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_3658.jpg  
    A man with a clock always knows the time. A man with two clocks is never sure.

  14. #29
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    Default Re: Mauthe Mystery (By: Tinker Dwight)

    Looks like you're on your way, now.

    A little off topic, but, I was wondering if anyone has ever reworked a GTB using a Torkelson clutch. More commonly known as a one-way bearing (The kind found in many automotive starters.)?
    I used to make click-less ratchets for my mechanic friends using these and know them to be pretty strong and reliable.
    The only 'fix' I believe I've seen for the GTB's plastic drum and spring failure is to keep the spring and replace the plastic with aluminum.
    Living life at eight beats per minute.

  15. #30
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    Default Re: Mauthe Mystery (By: MartinM)

    I don't believe a spring, itself, has ever failed. This is the
    same as the spring that retracts the set belt in a car.
    These are quite reliable. The nylon end is likely the problem.
    One like a starter motor has would work but it is not a cheap
    thing to machine for a clock.
    Tinker Dwight

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