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  1. #16
    Registered user. THTanner's Avatar
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    Default Re: Anker clock question for repair (By: dickstorer)

    Okay - thanks will do - I was wondering what sort of tool might do that job and I clearly do not have one. So the end shake is set by what the jewel rests against and cannot be adjusted?

    Quote Originally Posted by dickstorer View Post
    Tanner, I think you may be just a little bit wrong. That three legged thing you are talking about is the shock spring. The amount that you turn it to replace has nothing to do with end shake. Just turn it enough to keep it from coming out by itself. If you do not have the special tool needed to remove it, do not remove it. It is spring loaded and it will fly away easily. Best oil it by removing the bridge and oil as per my last post.
    You miss 100% of the shots you don't take. - The Great One

  2. #17

    Default Re: Anker clock question for repair (By: THTanner)

    Correct about the end shake. A word of caution is needed at this place, when you turn the balance bridge over and you have the balance wheel on top, you place something (I use a small curved needle nosed pliers)to weight the bal bridge down. Here is the caution---be careful to not get any oil on the hairspring, just on the hole jewel. Oil on the hairspring will make it stick to its self and that makes it run to fast. What are you using to apply your oil? A small dip oiler works pretty good for oiling jewel holes. In a ideal world oiling the cap jewel works better than putting oil on the hole jewel but only if you can safely remove the cap. The end shake is governed by the space between the cap jewel and the hole jewel.

  3. #18
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    Default Re: Anker clock question for repair (By: dickstorer)

    I use a pin oiler as well on small pivots and tight spots such as this. In this case I used one strand of multi strand copper twisted electrical wire. Not sure of the diameter - my micrometer is not accurate enough for this tiny wire. It is attached to a long piece of orange wood.

    I was on the process of making a tri tip out of an old tiny nut driver to pull that spring when your last post came through. Saved me a bunch of trouble I am sure.

    It is all cleaned and oiled and back together. A 1/4 turn sitting level gives just at one minute of oscillation till it stops. I have no idea if that is good, bad or ugly. Is there a test for these like there is for floating balance wheels?

    Quote Originally Posted by dickstorer View Post
    Correct about the end shake. A word of caution is needed at this place, when you turn the balance bridge over and you have the balance wheel on top, you place something (I use a small curved needle nosed pliers)to weight the bal bridge down. Here is the caution---be careful to not get any oil on the hairspring, just on the hole jewel. Oil on the hairspring will make it stick to its self and that makes it run to fast. What are you using to apply your oil? A small dip oiler works pretty good for oiling jewel holes. In a ideal world oiling the cap jewel works better than putting oil on the hole jewel but only if you can safely remove the cap. The end shake is governed by the space between the cap jewel and the hole jewel.
    You miss 100% of the shots you don't take. - The Great One

  4. #19

    Default Re: Anker clock question for repair (By: THTanner)

    The best test is if the clock runs when you wind it. I used to put a miniscule dot on the rim of the balance wheel, just so I could see the amplitude, if all is well you should get 360 degrees. And as Willie says, depthing of the escape pinion is critical.

    Good that you did not remove the shock spring, without the right tool they almost always end up in a haystack with some needles.

  5. #20
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    Default Re: Anker clock question for repair (By: dickstorer)

    Any idea what the beats per minute is supposed to be. This came in with a broken click spring on the time so I have not seen it run at all - I don't see any serious damage from that event - but these have a click spring that I do not stock and cannot find a direct replacement so I will be making one from a blank from Timesavers that I hope has the right spacing from the lock pin to the screw hole. But I cannot find any information on what the BPM should be.

    Quote Originally Posted by dickstorer View Post
    The best test is if the clock runs when you wind it. I used to put a miniscule dot on the rim of the balance wheel, just so I could see the amplitude, if all is well you should get 360 degrees. And as Willie says, depthing of the escape pinion is critical.

    Good that you did not remove the shock spring, without the right tool they almost always end up in a haystack with some needles.
    You miss 100% of the shots you don't take. - The Great One

  6. #21

    Default Re: Anker clock question for repair (By: THTanner)

    TAnner, BPM is 300.

  7. #22
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    Default Re: Anker clock question for repair (By: dickstorer)

    Great - thanks - see how it does

    Quote Originally Posted by dickstorer View Post
    TAnner, BPM is 300.
    You miss 100% of the shots you don't take. - The Great One

  8. #23
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    Default Re: Anker clock question for repair (By: THTanner)

    I've never lost a shock spring removing them.
    When I did this, I use one of those pins with a
    wooden handle. I put it in the hole at the center.
    I use another pin to work the spokes to the release
    point.
    It pops up the pin with the wooden handle and
    doesn't get lost.
    Putting is back is similar. You can hook two spokes
    in, at a slight angle and work the remaining spoke in
    with another needle.
    I've not fiddled with these in a long time so have nothing
    to show.
    Tinker Dwight

  9. #24
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    Default Re: Anker clock question for repair (By: Tinker Dwight)

    By making a tri tip out of a small old nut driver I had basically the same idea that it would stay inside the nut driver. But at the time I did not realize it would be that much of a spring action. This was my first time with anything like this since I do not work on watches and have never before dealt with a jeweled escapement other than the floating balance wheels.

    However, I took dickstorer's excellent advice and lifted the bridge instead.

    The clock is running right at 300 bpm this morning with just the time train powered. I will let it settle in for a day or so and see how steady it runs. I am getting right at 180 degrees each way which seems a pretty happy action and it is very consistent according to the timing ap I use.

    Thanks again everyone. Another fine lesson and success.



    Quote Originally Posted by Tinker Dwight View Post
    I've never lost a shock spring removing them.
    When I did this, I use one of those pins with a
    wooden handle. I put it in the hole at the center.
    I use another pin to work the spokes to the release
    point.
    It pops up the pin with the wooden handle and
    doesn't get lost.
    Putting is back is similar. You can hook two spokes
    in, at a slight angle and work the remaining spoke in
    with another needle.
    I've not fiddled with these in a long time so have nothing
    to show.
    Tinker Dwight
    You miss 100% of the shots you don't take. - The Great One

  10. #25

    Default Re: Anker clock question for repair (By: THTanner)

    Yeah Tanner, you have taken the fear out of servicing jeweled platforms.

  11. #26
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    Default Re: Anker clock question for repair (By: dickstorer)

    actually - you took the fear out of it - great teacher -

    Quote Originally Posted by dickstorer View Post
    Yeah Tanner, you have taken the fear out of servicing jeweled platforms.
    You miss 100% of the shots you don't take. - The Great One

  12. #27
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    Default Re: Anker clock question for repair (By: THTanner)

    Curious situation. The escapement beats right at 300 bpm with the plastic cover off and has about 270 degrees rotation now that it has settled in for a day. If I put the plastic cover over the escapement it immediately loses rotation - dropping to about 100 degrees total. The beat drops from 300 to 299 and becomes a bit erratic.

    Looking closely at the plastic cover in place I can see that the balance wheel clears the plastic by something less than 1/10th mm. There is no sign that it actually touches the plastic since there is no marking on the plastic and it did not rub away a small ink mark I made where it would touch.

    I live in a desert and the relative humidity today was about 15% so static electricity is a problem with plastic in general here. So I am wondering, 1) is it possible that static electricity builds up in the plastic and that retards the balance wheel? 2) is that just too little clearance and the effect of air moving in that tiny gap creates eddies or venturi type air flow that slows the balance wheel? Or does anyone have any other ideas or experience with this?

    The plastic cover seems square and not warped and fits over the outside of the platform properly, but it is a very close fit to the balance wheel. I am thinking of shaving away some of the plastic on the inside of the cover to add a bit more space. I don't want to cut through and make a gap there, but I need to figure out a way to keep the plastic cover from affecting the rotation and BPM. Another idea is to cut out part of the side of the cover and then glue on a bowed cover to keep it closed up with more room.

    Any ideas would be welcome.
    You miss 100% of the shots you don't take. - The Great One

  13. #28

    Default Re: Anker clock question for repair (By: THTanner)

    I have never had this happen to me, but the first thing that comes to mind is that your whole platform may have a little residual magnetism that is enhanced when you put the cover on. Can you bring it to time after the cover is on?

    And for Tinker---Good trick about the way to remove and replace the shock spring, you should have told me many shock springs ago. What about the ones that do not have a hole?

  14. #29
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    Default Re: Anker clock question for repair (By: dickstorer)

    Magnetism was my first thought as well. So I put the whole assembly on a watch demagnetizer and made sure it was clean. With the cover on the regulating lever makes almost no difference at all to regulate the time. It stays between 299.25 and 299.55 regardless of how you move the lever according to the AP I use. I am going to try to swell the sides of the cover out just a little this morning and see if that cures it.

    Quote Originally Posted by dickstorer View Post
    I have never had this happen to me, but the first thing that comes to mind is that your whole platform may have a little residual magnetism that is enhanced when you put the cover on. Can you bring it to time after the cover is on?

    And for Tinker---Good trick about the way to remove and replace the shock spring, you should have told me many shock springs ago. What about the ones that do not have a hole?
    You miss 100% of the shots you don't take. - The Great One

  15. #30

    Default Re: Anker clock question for repair (By: THTanner)

    How about leaving the cover off?

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