Goal: $300, Received: $115.00 (38%) Contribute Now
Donate whatever you can or Join the 14,000 other NAWCC members for only $80 (plus $10 for hard copy publications). Check it out here.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 38
  1. #16
    Registered User Randy Beckett's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Mt. Pleasant, Tx
    Posts
    2,420

    Default Re: Restoration of a Seth Thomas wall clock (By: R. Croswell)

    When you remove the dial, it would be a good idea to set it up and take a good high resolution picture of it, so it can be reproduced in the future, if need be. Straight on, with the camera on a tripod, would be best.

    I have used spray clear lacquer in very light coats to help stabilize badly flaking dials before with some success. Holding the can well away and making one or two fast strokes, to simulate more of an "overspray" effect, than a solid coat.
    "Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around the laws."- Plato (428 - 348 BC)

  2. #17

    Default Re: Restoration of a Seth Thomas wall clock (By: Randy Beckett)

    Quote Originally Posted by Randy Beckett View Post
    When you remove the dial, it would be a good idea to set it up and take a good high resolution picture of it, so it can be reproduced in the future, if need be. Straight on, with the camera on a tripod, would be best.
    A flatbed scanner also works with no need to worry about being straight on. Be sure to scan at high resolution.

  3. #18
    Registered user.
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Calif. USA
    Posts
    13,351

    Default Re: Restoration of a Seth Thomas wall clock (By: R. Croswell)

    I also recommend using JB-weld, rather than soldering.
    Using an undersized heating device will just make a mess
    with soldering.
    Cleaning up a solder mess requires more heat than creating
    it.
    Tinker Dwight

  4. #19

    Default Re: Restoration of a Seth Thomas wall clock

    I like this idea of sealing with clear lacquer. Thanks
    I will take a high-res picture too - good idea that.
    N.

  5. #20

    Default Re: Restoration of a Seth Thomas wall clock (By: SurreyNick)

    By the weekend I should be in a position to reassemble the clock and thoughts are turning toward getting the clock running again. However as you can see from the attached pictures the mechanism is pretty dirty.

    Can you offer any advice, based on the condition of this mechanism?

    I have read a number of threads herein and note particularly that running a clock which isn't properly oiled and/or which has deposits in the pivot holes can cause irreparable damage and that improper cleaning can be just as bad. I certainly don't want to damage the clock and I know an obvious answer will be "give it to a professional to strip down, clean and reassemble", but I fear the cost of doing so will be prohibitive. Will it be sufficient to just carefully wipe off the surface dirt, clean out the pivot holes with wooden toothpicks and then apply new clock oil with one of those syringes, or does it really need to be completely disassembled, cleaned and rebuilt?

    Frankly I'd rather do less than more.

    Thanks

    Nick

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Mechanism Uncleaned 01.jpg 
Views:	15 
Size:	316.0 KB 
ID:	342845Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Mechanism Uncleaned 02.jpg 
Views:	11 
Size:	288.0 KB 
ID:	342846Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Mechanism Uncleaned 03.jpg 
Views:	11 
Size:	218.3 KB 
ID:	342847Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Mechanism Uncleaned 04.jpg 
Views:	13 
Size:	203.9 KB 
ID:	342848

  6. #21
    Registered user.
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Calif. USA
    Posts
    13,351

    Default Re: Restoration of a Seth Thomas wall clock (By: SurreyNick)

    This is a simple time only movement. The only issue
    for taking it apart and putting it back together is
    containing the spring. Once apart you can clean
    out the bushings properly.
    Pushing the gunk around with a tooth pick is more
    likely to get it back in the bushing between the
    pivot and bushing than just leaving it where it is.
    This would be one of the easiest clocks to clean as it
    has no strike to deal with.
    Tinker Dwight

  7. #22

    Default Re: Restoration of a Seth Thomas wall clock (By: SurreyNick)

    Quote Originally Posted by SurreyNick View Post
    ....I certainly don't want to damage the clock and I know an obvious answer will be "give it to a professional to strip down, clean and reassemble", but I fear the cost of doing so will be prohibitive. Will it be sufficient to just carefully wipe off the surface dirt, clean out the pivot holes with wooden toothpicks and then apply new clock oil with one of those syringes.....
    No.
    ..... or does it really need to be completely disassembled, cleaned and rebuilt?

    Frankly I'd rather do less than more.

    Nick
    If you expect it to run properly for any length of time is should be disassembled and cleaned, including cleaning the main spring. As for needing to be 'rebuilt', that cannot be determined while it is still assembled and this filthy. As noted this is one of the easiest clocks to disassemble and clean. If that's beyond your current ability you might consider taking just the movement to a clock shop and ask for a price, which may be less than you expect because its a simple job for the shop as well. As far as the cost to 'rebuild', most of the cost is in the time to disassemble, clean, reassemble, test, and adjust the clock. "rebuilding" generally means installing a few bushing and smoothing up a few pivots so don't expect a rebuild to be that much more than a proper cleaning.

    As for "preferring to do less" I'm afraid there are a few here who advocate such measures but a half-fast repair job is just that. My recommendation is learn how to fix it right, or turn the job over to someone who will.

    RC

  8. #23

    Default Re: Restoration of a Seth Thomas wall clock (By: R. Croswell)

    OK. I have studied various guides and instructions and feel confident I can disassemble and clean this mechanism, so I have ordered some Horolene cleaning solutions and will tackle the job once that's arrived.

    In the meantime, I do have a question about letting down the mainspring.

    The click spring and click on this mechanism are inside of the plates (see pic 2 and 3) and I was wondering therefore if the best way to proceed would be to first let the mainspring run itself down by releasing the escapement wheel by loosening off the nut of the bracket holding the pallet (marked A in pic 1). I assume I can then proceed to remove the front plate, gaining access to the click spring and click in order to let down the mainspring completely.

    Is this a reasonable approach?

    Thanks
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Escapement.JPG 
Views:	5 
Size:	197.9 KB 
ID:	342998   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Winding Arbor.JPG 
Views:	4 
Size:	194.9 KB 
ID:	342999   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Click Spring, Click and Click Wheel.jpg 
Views:	1 
Size:	220.7 KB 
ID:	343000  

  9. #24
    Registered user. Kevin W.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Nepean, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    20,082
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Restoration of a Seth Thomas wall clock (By: SurreyNick)

    You need to contain the main spring, some good strong wire around it. Then let down the power oh the main spring with a let down tool. The link i posted should help soon. DONOT remove the front plate with the clock main spring not let down. You could be hurt and the clock may suffer damage as well.
    You need to do some reading on how to properly service a clock. There is tons of free information on this web site.
    Here is the link for you to look over on letting down the power.
    http://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?1...lbert-movement
    One clock at a time. Kevin West
    http://www.global-horology.com/GHMB/

  10. #25

    Default Re: Restoration of a Seth Thomas wall clock (By: Kevin W.)

    Thank you. I will do as you say and follow the instructions in the thread

  11. #26

    Default Re: Restoration of a Seth Thomas wall clock (By: SurreyNick)

    Quote Originally Posted by SurreyNick View Post
    OK. I have studied various guides and instructions and feel confident I can disassemble and clean this mechanism, so I have ordered some Horolene cleaning solutions and will tackle the job once that's arrived.

    In the meantime, I do have a question about letting down the mainspring.

    The click spring and click on this mechanism are inside of the plates (see pic 2 and 3) and I was wondering therefore if the best way to proceed would be to first let the mainspring run itself down by releasing the escapement wheel by loosening off the nut of the bracket holding the pallet (marked A in pic 1). I assume I can then proceed to remove the front plate, gaining access to the click spring and click in order to let down the mainspring completely.

    Is this a reasonable approach?

    Thanks
    Step one, remove the screw and bracket lower right and remove the little 'star-like' stop work gear from the winding arbor. Left in place the main spring will only unwind to a point and stop. That's what the 'stop work' is for. Then oil well all the pivot holes. You don't want to let it 'spin down' with dry pivots. Then hold the escape wheel from turning and remove the verge, then gradually release the escape wheel but keep a bit of tension so it doesn't run wild. Allow it to spin down until the main spring expands to just a bit less that the main gear diameter. Then stop the escape wheel, insert a stick or otherwise prevent it from turning. Then tie a piece of steel wire (about #18 of heavier) around the main spring and pillar. Now release the escape wheel and let it run down all the way until it stops. STILL NOT QUITE READY! Hold the winding arbor with the winding key or a letdown tool and release the click and click spring so the click swings free, then unwind with the key or letdown tool until there is ZERO tension on the main wheel. It should feel loose when you turn it back and forth by hand. NOW you can separate the plates.

    The spring will need to be cleaned so put on a glove, get a good grip on it and snip the wire the slowly release your grip and let the spring expand. (Do not try to untwist the wire or use it over again.) When you get ready to put it back we can discuss several ways that you can rewind that spring.

    RC

  12. #27

    Default Re: Restoration of a Seth Thomas wall clock (By: SurreyNick)

    Yes, you can let the movement run itself down (oil it first). It's best to either let it run down into a 'C' clip, or let it run until the coil is even with the inside edge of the mainwheel rim and contain it with rebar tie wire, then continue to let it run until the spring is held by the wire.
    Note, at this point all of the power is not gone. You can complete the letdown by hand, using your key for control and a small screwdriver to lift the click. When the power is completely down, everything between the plates, including the mainspring assembly, will be loose. This is when you can observe all the wear points for excessive wear. If it's really oily/dirty, rinse and brush in paint thinner or Coleman lantern fuel, dry with compressed air and a hair blower. This will make assessment easier and it's a lot more pleasant to work on.
    Willie X

  13. #28

    Default Re: Restoration of a Seth Thomas wall clock (By: Willie X)

    Thank you all for the detailed instructions. I feel much more confident about the procedure now
    Nick.

  14. #29

    Default Re: Restoration of a Seth Thomas wall clock (By: SurreyNick)

    While I await the arrival of the cleaning solution I thought I'd share some of the progress I have been making with this clock.

    The Bezel turned into a bit of a challenge. I thought I just had a simple break to contend with, but no such luck. When I unscrewed the hinge I found the hinge plate was broken in two and that the remaining bit of hinge plate was fractured too. The bezel itself also had several other worrying fractures in the vicinity of the break. It is also quite badly pitted.

    I might have just sought out a replacement, but my wife understandably wants to retain as much of the original clock as possible and so I set about repairing it.

    I used some brass foil and JB-Weld to fix the break from behind and extended the foil/epoxy repair in both directions to provide support for the fractures. It's quite an ugly repair, but the best I could manage and at least most of it is hidden from sight. The hinge I repaired with a piece of 0.55 mm brass sheet glued to the front of the hinge plate with JB-Weld, which I then filed to shape and drilled through the old screw holes. A thorough clean and burnish and I now have (I hope) a serviceable bezel. The new glass will be fitted at the weekend.


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Bezel broken hinge.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	255.2 KB 
ID:	343246Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Bezel cleaned ready for repair.jpg 
Views:	3 
Size:	199.3 KB 
ID:	343247Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Bezel repaied hinge 01.jpg 
Views:	6 
Size:	264.6 KB 
ID:	343248Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Bezel repaired hinge 02.jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	289.6 KB 
ID:	343249Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Bezel repaired.jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	334.4 KB 
ID:	343250

  15. #30

    Default Re: Restoration of a Seth Thomas wall clock (By: SurreyNick)

    The clock case was badly neglected, having been stored in a damp loft for many years. The veneer was split and torn, with pieces missing from the front of the pendulum box and from the side too. It was lifting in several places too. The finish was also shot, having reacted with the damp conditions to go cloudy and pitted.

    Left to my own devices I would have completely stripped the case of its old finish taking it back to bare wood, but my wife wouldn't have it. She thought it would make it look too new so I was only allowed minimal intervention.

    I had no choice but to completely replace the veneer on the bottom right panel of the pendulum box and also the missing piece on the front. I also had to replace a sizable piece on the bottom right hand side. Sadly, I couldn't get an exact match for the veneer and had to settle for Sapele. However, using a combination of dyes I managed to match the colour quite closely even if the grain is different and the repair is really only apparent on the side. Having re-glued the other bits which were lifting I then refinished it with wax over French Polish. The end result is, I think, quite effective.


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Clock 01.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	438.1 KB 
ID:	343251Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Clock 03.jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	270.4 KB 
ID:	343252Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Restored Clock Case 01.jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	178.6 KB 
ID:	343254Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Restored Clock Case 02.jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	237.9 KB 
ID:	343253

Similar Threads

  1. Restoration of the Seth Thomas #2 Tower Clock has been completed
    By Stotman in forum Tower, Monumental, and Street Clocks of the World
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-22-2014, 07:00 AM
  2. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-01-2009, 02:00 PM
  3. Seth Thomas wall clock movement types
    By Seth Thomas Fan in forum Clocks General.
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-25-2006, 03:22 AM
  4. Seth thomas wall clocks on ebay
    By Doug Barr in forum Clocks General.
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-11-2005, 05:20 AM
  5. Seth Thomas Wall Clock? Id needed??
    By tymfxr in forum Clocks General.
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 07-22-2005, 12:55 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •