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  1. #16

    Default Re: Waterbury Weights? (By: JST)

    yes, well that might account for it! 8-)

    whenever i buy a weight-driven clock i immediately remove the dial and inspect the movement and ESPECIALLY the weight cords... and usually replace them with new braided nylon cord do i don't have to worry about weights crashing through the bottom of cases on my watch (so to speak!).

    glad you worked it out... nice clock.
    i collect antique clocks because i get all that extra time...

  2. #17

    Default Re: Waterbury Weights? (By: JST)

    That clock looks really nice. I have always been partial to the 10 and 12 sided geometrics.
    Willie X

  3. #18

    Default Re: Waterbury Weights? (By: Willie X)

    Thanks Smike and Willie X. I'm glad to say that it's still running. The pulleys for the cord (which should be replaced) are attached to the top of the clock case. You can see that from the first two pictures in my last posting. The bolt from the pulley goes through the top of the case and a square nut on the other side holds it in place. I can post more pictures if you need them. I'm curious, if I remove the movement from the case, how do I test it? Can it go into some sort of test stand? Or do I put the movement back in the case to test it? Any advise? Thanks

  4. #19

    Default Re: Waterbury Weights? (By: JST)

    If the movement is in good condition, it will run on one weight. They are easy to work on, so a take-apart cleaning is something that should not be put off, even if it will run on one weight. ☺
    Willie X

  5. #20

    Default Re: Waterbury Weights? (By: JST)

    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    Thanks Smike and Willie X. I'm glad to say that it's still running. The pulleys for the cord (which should be replaced) are attached to the top of the clock case. You can see that from the first two pictures in my last posting. The bolt from the pulley goes through the top of the case and a square nut on the other side holds it in place. I can post more pictures if you need them. I'm curious, if I remove the movement from the case, how do I test it? Can it go into some sort of test stand? Or do I put the movement back in the case to test it? Any advise? Thanks

    if you remove the movement and go through it and do all the right things... make sure no bushings are needed, clean and burnish pivots, ultrasonically clean the movement, make sure everything is true, etc. and then reassemble WITHOUT the verge, you can oil LIGHTLY and spin the gears with the slightest touch of a finger. you will be able to tell that it's a happy movement, ready to run.

    you can (relatively easily) create a test stand by getting a piece of plywood (or a place you can work on a level garage wall) and mounting the bracket the the wood (or wall). you can then also suspend the pulleys as needed so you can run the bare movement and observe....

    it's a nice clock and certainly worth a professional servicing if there's a clock shop or nawcc member near you. if you want to do it yourself, do you have any tools... lathe? ultrasonic cleaner? good clock oil? have you done this before? if yes, you're good to go. in no, please PM me and i can share some approaches that might help, but might not be (fully) endorsed by those more experienced in the right way(s) to do this... but that would at least be better than doing nothing.
    i collect antique clocks because i get all that extra time...

  6. #21

    Default Re: Waterbury Weights? (By: bruce linde)

    Thanks for the advice smike. I'm comfortable repairing most clocks. This one won't be too bad. I learned over the years to not assume I always know what I'm doing, and ask questions even though sometimes they sound a bit silly. Probably will end up putting this movement in a test holder than can handle weight driven movements. It won't be exactly like the pulleys in the case, but good enough for testing. Thanks again. I appreciate everybody's responses.

  7. #22

    Default Re: Waterbury Weights? (By: JST)

    hope I didn't offend! I know I'm a newbie here, just trying to share the few things I actually have learned. :-)
    i collect antique clocks because i get all that extra time...

  8. #23
    Forums Administrator harold bain's Avatar
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    Default Re: Waterbury Weights? (By: JST)

    I usually find the best test stand for clocks like this one is the case it came in. Everything fits just fine.
    harold bain, Member ch 33
    "If it won't "tick",
    let me "tock" to it"

  9. #24
    Registered User THTanner's Avatar
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    Default Re: Waterbury Weights? (By: JST)

    On some of these movements I have run them on the test stand without a set of pulleys. The pulleys are in the case to get the weights away from the pendulum and to provide sufficient drop without a longer case size. Observe how the string comes off the arbor, and simply drop the string and the weight directly under the movement, taking care to make sure the string is not tangled or interfering. I sometimes tie a slip knot loop on the string to have the weight hang closer to the movement so I don't have to hang it too high on the test stand.

    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    Thanks for the advice smike. I'm comfortable repairing most clocks. This one won't be too bad. I learned over the years to not assume I always know what I'm doing, and ask questions even though sometimes they sound a bit silly. Probably will end up putting this movement in a test holder than can handle weight driven movements. It won't be exactly like the pulleys in the case, but good enough for testing. Thanks again. I appreciate everybody's responses.
    You miss 100% of the shots you don't take. - The Great One

  10. #25

    Default Re: Waterbury Weights? (By: THTanner)

    Thanks everybody for the advice on how to test the movement. I do have one test stand that can handle the weight cords. The cords won't go above the movement like they do in the case, but it should work for testing purposes.

    smike - I certainly didn't take any offense to your suggestions because I'm positive none was intended. I appreciate your thoughts and experiences.

  11. #26

    Default Re: Waterbury Weights? (By: JST)

    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    Thanks everybody for the advice on how to test the movement. I do have one test stand that can handle the weight cords. The cords won't go above the movement like they do in the case, but it should work for testing purposes.
    smike - I certainly didn't take any offense to your suggestions because I'm positive none was intended. I appreciate your thoughts and experiences.


    good.

    btw, just bought these on ebay... another didn't-really-need-'em-but-why-the-heck-not purchase. given our discussions here, i can see clamping them onto a piece of plywood upon which the movement bracket and movement are mounted. they would then let you mimic the in-case setup, while allowing you to visually inspect the running (hopefully!) movement from all angles. as opposed to harold, i often have trouble getting my entire head into the case during testing! 8-)

    my thinking is that these have to be for just that purpose, as i can't see anyone wanted to clamp (instead of more permanently install) needed pulleys in a tall case.



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    i collect antique clocks because i get all that extra time...

  12. #27
    Forums Administrator harold bain's Avatar
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    Default Re: Waterbury Weights? (By: bruce linde)

    I have a flashlight and a mirror to see what needs to be seen while the movement is in the case for testing.
    harold bain, Member ch 33
    "If it won't "tick",
    let me "tock" to it"

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