Goal: $300, Received: $370.00 (124%) Contribute Now
Donate whatever you can or Join the 14,000 other NAWCC members for only $80 (plus $10 for hard copy publications). Check it out here.



Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 48

Thread: Intrinsic value

  1. #31

    Default Re: Intrinsic value (By: Tom McIntyre)

    My view of intrinsic value of any object is as the sum of its tangible and intangible value, many people might agree on a similar tangible value, but the intangible value is likely vary significantly from one person to another. As collectors we appreciate the intangible element which others consign to the melting pot!

    John

  2. #32
    Registered user. Les harland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Hertfordshire England
    Posts
    626

    Default Re: Intrinsic value (By: John Matthews)

    John
    Could you translate your post into simple English that the rest of us can undestand please

  3. #33

    Default Re: Intrinsic value (By: Les harland)

    Les - sorry it was not my intent to be unclear, I was simply trying to express how I personally view intrinsic value. Tangible = having physical existence. In the case of a watch, this would include the value of the metal content of the case and the workmanship of the movement, accuracy etc. Intangible = without physical existence (not able to be touched). For a watch this would include characteristics which might be important to many individuals such as, its history, its place in the development of timekeeping or it might be something very personal, e.g. my Father's Waltham Traveler has relatively low tangible value, but to me very high intangible value and hence to me personally, it has very high intrinsic value.

    John

  4. #34
    Registered user. Les harland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Hertfordshire England
    Posts
    626

    Default Re: Intrinsic value (By: John Matthews)

    Thanks John
    I was struggling with it and thought that people whose first language is not English would have even more trouble

  5. #35
    Registered User musicguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Orange County, NY
    Posts
    358

    Default Re: Intrinsic value (By: Les harland)

    In the end everyone collects watches /clocks for different reasons.
    For some, it's for the Historical value of the clock, some for the beauty, some
    for the utilitarian value, some because they want to show off something
    of value to others, some for their rarity, and some for their $$$ value.

    For some it's a mixture of all of the above. And it evolves
    the longer you collect, to the point that you appreciate them
    in more and more ways.



    Rob

  6. #36

    Default Re: Intrinsic value

    Quote Originally Posted by John Matthews View Post
    Les - sorry it was not my intent to be unclear, I was simply trying to express how I personally view intrinsic value. Tangible = having physical existence. In the case of a watch, this would include the value of the metal content of the case and the workmanship of the movement, accuracy etc. Intangible = without physical existence (not able to be touched). For a watch this would include characteristics which might be important to many individuals such as, its history, its place in the development of timekeeping or it might be something very personal, e.g. my Father's Waltham Traveler has relatively low tangible value, but to me very high intangible value and hence to me personally, it has very high intrinsic value
    This is basically correct, I believe.

    The intrinsic values of a watch are its value as a watch, its accuracy as a timepiece, the value of its materials. The extrinsic values relate to its attractiveness, the name of the maker, the identity of past owners, the history it has survived.

    As John has said, there will tend to be general agreement amongst users and collectors on its intrinsic value, but extrinsic value is far more a matter of subjective opinion, and will tend to vary over time with fashion.
    Martin Rosen

  7. #37

    Default Re: Intrinsic value

    It's a well-worn cliché, but I guess it boils down to which posessions you grab when escaping from your burning house........
    P
    Last edited by Audemars; 04-08-2017 at 09:43 AM.

  8. #38
    Registered user. stewey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Oshawa, Ontario.
    Posts
    944

    Default Re: Intrinsic value (By: Audemars)

    And of course some items can have an intrinsic and extrinsic value which are both monetary in nature. For example, some rare examples of the 1973 "Mountie" quarter have an intrinsic value of 25 cents; however, they also have a collectors' , or extrinsic value, in the hundreds of dollars depending upon their condition.

  9. #39

    Default Re: Intrinsic value (By: stewey)

    Stewey, I think that extrinsic value almost always exceeds (by a margin) the intrinsic.

    A famous recent example is the "diamond skull" created by Damien Hirst. It contains, according to a well-reputed diamond expert, about £7-10million in diamonds, so that is its intrinsic value. The Damien Hirst name added some £30million to that to make its alleged sale price of £38million, and that £30million is its extrinsic value.

    A similar example would be that alleged Monet painting which was sold for (I think) £25million, declared a fake, and then resold for some tens of thousands.

    And in our own market sphere, I handled a late 19th century pocket watch which had a broken balance staff, unknown maker, battered silver case, worth less than £50 ... and it sold at auction for £1250 because its inscription proved it was worn by a British officer who led part of the expeditionary force sent to rescue General Gordon from the siege of khartoum.
    Martin Rosen

  10. #40
    Registered user. roughbarked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Western NSW, Australia
    Posts
    1,263

    Default Re: Intrinsic value (By: Audemars)

    Quote Originally Posted by Audemars View Post
    It's a well-worn cliché, but I guess it boils down to which posessions you grab when escaping from your burning house........
    P
    More and more people are finding this out as the incidence of whole towns being wiped out in busfires increases.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intrin...sic_properties

    I have no idea why people seem to think that making the letters bold or using capslock, actually emphasises anything other than the inability to use language.
    Last edited by roughbarked; 04-08-2017 at 05:46 PM.

  11. #41
    Registered user. stewey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Oshawa, Ontario.
    Posts
    944

    Default Re: Intrinsic value (By: roughbarked)

    This has turned out to be a very interesting thread: Numerous opinions, interpretations, and examples.

  12. #42

    Default Re: Intrinsic value (By: roughbarked)

    Quote Originally Posted by roughbarked View Post
    I have no idea why people seem to think that making the letters bold or using capslock, actually emphasises anything other than the inability to use language.
    The words, together with their meanings, themselves are intrinsic to the statement being made,

    The bold and capitalletters add extrinsic emphasis to some of those words.

    Martin Rosen

  13. #43
    Registered user. roughbarked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Western NSW, Australia
    Posts
    1,263

    Default Re: Intrinsic value (By: MartyR)

    If you say so.

  14. #44
    Registered user. rstl99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    168

    Default Re: Intrinsic value

    Now now, everyone has a personal feeling or opinion on this, there is no right and no wrong, let's not get hung up on semantics or style, or dictionary definition of what the word "intrinsic" officially means. Obviously the value each of us assign to our cherished ticking objects (or non-ticking in some cases) goes beyond that. For me, one big source of pride of acquisition and ownership is the provenance, which could be the previous owners if known and of significance, but mostly of the maker, his reputation as a person and craftsman, his position in the history of watchmaking evolution, or proximity to some notable figureheads (for ex, a recently acquired Oudin verge fusée watch, due to him having been a close collaborator of Breguet).
    I suppose I look for timepieces that are reasonably affordable to acquire yet possess (to me anyway, and maybe only to me) great significance and value.
    Last edited by rstl99; 04-09-2017 at 12:04 PM.

  15. #45
    Registered user. roughbarked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Western NSW, Australia
    Posts
    1,263

    Default Re: Intrinsic value (By: rstl99)

    Quote Originally Posted by rstl99 View Post
    Now now, everyone has a personal feeling or opinion on this, there is no right and no wrong, let's not get hung up on semantics or style, or dictionary definition of what the word "intrinsic" officially means. Obviously the value each of us assign to our cherished ticking objects (or non-ticking in some cases) goes beyond that. For me, one big source of pride of acquisition and ownership is the provenance, which could be the previous owners if known and of significance, but mostly of the maker, his reputation as a person and craftsman, his position in the history of watchmaking evolution, or proximity to some notable figureheads (for ex, a recently acquired Oudin verge fusée watch, due to him having been a close collaborator of Breguet).
    I suppose I look for timepieces that are reasonably affordable to acquire yet possess (to me anyway, and maybe only to me) great significance and value.
    and yes, this would go along with what you see on Antiques Roadshow.. Provenance adds everything to the possible collectible value at auction but on any particular day in any particular market.

    In the eye of the beholder also means, in the eye of who is paying.
    Mostly cherish the maker. It is indeed craftsmanship that catches my eye. Provenance matters in that it proves age in use. Interesting that someone owned it. Well someone did, even if it hadn't been noted.

Similar Threads

  1. Diminished Clock Value?
    By J.S.H. in forum Clock Repair
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 11-02-2006, 07:41 PM
  2. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-09-2006, 11:50 PM
  3. Want to find approx. value of my clock - New Haven.
    By W.R. WoodWorking in forum Clocks General.
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-31-2005, 05:58 PM
  4. Hopalong Cassidy Watch: Value?
    By bobswatch in forum Wrist Watches
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-02-2005, 09:49 PM
  5. What determines a clocks value?
    By RickThomes in forum Clocks General.
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 05-03-2005, 07:23 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •