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  1. #1

    Default Gilbert Sharp Gothic

    Bought this Gilbert Sharp Gothic in my travels today. The only markings I can find on the movement are 6 1/2 no Gilbert stamp. I googled Gilbert movements and didn't see any the same as this, although there's no extra holes in the backboard. Can anyone put an approximate date to this clock based on the label or movement. Thanks


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  2. #2

    Default Re: Gilbert Sharp Gothic (By: sylvester12)

    The manufacturer's name on the label seems to be Wm. L. Gilbert & Co., which Gilbert used twice, 1845-48 and 1851-66. I suspect that the latter company is involved here. Perhaps the patriotic theme on the door glass is intended to show support for the Union during the Civil War era, or even somewhat before it, when things started getting testy.

    The movement appears to be one that has been attributed to Sperry & Bryant. A bit of information on that company is provided in this thread. It lists some characteristics of Sperry & Bryant movements and provides a couple of links to relevant Bulletin articles. This particular article has a picture of a similar (not same) movement on page 380, figure 10C. I have found other examples of presumed Sperry & Bryant movements, some more like what is in yours. However, there is no example of a signed Sperry & Bryant movement, and I tend to think that many of those ascribed to that firm were not made by them. I have my own preferences in this regard, but they are mere suppositions at this point and not fully thought out. I could well be on the wrong track (imagine that!).

    Note, FWIW, that the location Winchester appears on the label instead of the expected and more commonly found Winsted. We have discussed this usage before; see, for example, this thread. No particular conclusions seem to have been reached.
    “If one tells the truth, one is sure, sooner or later, to be found out.” - Oscar Wilde

  3. #3

    Default Re: Gilbert Sharp Gothic (By: Steven Thornberry)

    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Thornberry View Post
    The manufacturer's name on the label seems to be Wm. L. Gilbert & Co., which Gilbert used twice, 1845-48 and 1851-66. I suspect that the latter company is involved here. Perhaps the patriotic theme on the door glass is intended to show support for the Union during the Civil War era, or even somewhat before it, when things started getting testy.

    The movement appears to be one that has been attributed to Sperry & Bryant. A bit of information on that company is provided in this thread. It lists some characteristics of Sperry & Bryant movements and provides a couple of links to relevant Bulletin articles. This particular article has a picture of a similar (not same) movement on page 380, figure 10C. I have found other examples of presumed Sperry & Bryant movements, some more like what is in yours. However, there is no example of a signed Sperry & Bryant movement, and I tend to think that many of those ascribed to that firm were not made by them. I have my own preferences in this regard, but they are mere suppositions at this point and not fully thought out. I could well be on the wrong track (imagine that!).

    Note, FWIW, that the location Winchester appears on the label instead of the expected and more commonly found Winsted. We have discussed this usage before; see, for example, this thread. No particular conclusions seem to have been reached.
    Thanks for providing all of your very interesting information, much appreciated. It definitely puts my mind at ease regarding the movement in this clock.

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