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  1. #16
    Registered User dweiss17's Avatar
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    Default Re: Nearly 52 years in the NAWCC (By: dweiss17)

    Tyler: Attached is the Howard resilient Coles Escapement...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails case and back.JPG  

  2. #17
    Registered user. Kevin W.'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Nearly 52 years in the NAWCC (By: dweiss17)

    Great looking watch Dan, wish you lived closer so i could come over and share our enjoyment of horology.
    One clock at a time. Kevin West
    http://www.global-horology.com/GHMB/

  3. #18
    Registered User Tyler K.'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Nearly 52 years in the NAWCC (By: Kevin W.)

    Wow! It looks great! I've never seen one of these! Good work.
    A world without time is chaos.

  4. #19
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    Default Re: Nearly 52 years in the NAWCC (By: captainscarlet)

    Note: Click three times on the thumbnail following page one, for easier reading.

    Page seven:

    Sometime later, the aforementioned resilient Howard Coles Escapement watch, after I enjoyed having it for a few months, was sold to a Howard collector at a Chapter 1 meeting. Of the 535 made, I understand about 42 may exist…running or not?

    While ruminating concerning the Howard watches I discovered during my NAWCC years…the following story will prove the old cliché…”You never know what is around the corner” carries a lot of truth.

    September 6, 2016, I posted an obituary [from September 5, 1987] on the NAWCC Message Board relating a friend’s passing…Dr. Warner D. Bundens, my friend and a former President of both Chapter 1 and the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors. We were both former members of a long gone NAWCC Chapter 95 of Cherry Hill, NJ. Now, as previously stated on one of these pages, I must go back a number of years to tell the following story. It was at Chapter 95 I met a young man, I called him the “mad genius”, he could look at a complicated watch and discern by just a quick glance at the movement, the needed repair on such a timepiece not functioning correctly. Tom became a repairman for me on some watches I did not have the skill to repair. Working from his home, he had three work benches besides A galaxy of tools I had no working knowledge of…I was there to pick up a watch on which he had done some repair for me.

    On one of the benches - Tom was working on a complicated watch, he also had another watch running dial side down with the screw on back off…looking at the timepiece as it lay on his bench, it had no engraving on the plate, just beautifully damascened with a sun ray pattern…the plate looked remarkably similar to the keywind Howard I bought a few weeks earlier from a dealer on jewelers row in downtown Philadelphia, except this watch was stem wound and set. And, it had the same brown screws as on my keywind that held the dial legs tight to the sun rayed movement. Tom asked me if I would like to buy it, saying yes, for $50.00 it was mine. The back cover screwed down, he handed me the watch, this nice looking dial was nameless, with the hour symbols in Arabic numerals, and with red five minute markers outside the attractive eye appealing dial.

    Finishing our other business, I was anxious to drive back home and remove the dial by taking off the hands and then unscrew the brown looking screws that held the dial to the top plate. In doing so…I had found the only watch to ever leave the Howard factory with its plates un-engraved, no name or serial number. And a top plate that looked eerily similar to my keywind Howard…furthering my belief…I found the only Howard pocket watch to ever leave the factory un-engraved, now housed in a Silveroid sidewinder case.

    Home, at my workbench I took this strange watch apart, the five serial numbers inside the bottom plate were punched out, the balance cock had a three serial number. Thinking I found the only watch to not be engraved and a product of the Howard Watch Company…I did all the research I could think of, and still could not

    fathom why this beautiful timepiece would have no Howard name on its plates or dial…coming up with the theory that possibly a Howard employee took a discard or pilfered this movement for his personal use…and used the O’Hara dial and black special filigree and beautiful hands to disguise its Howard pocket watch look.

  5. #20
    Registered User dweiss17's Avatar
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    Default Re: Nearly 52 years in the NAWCC (By: dweiss17)

    Page eight

    The finding and story of this strange un-engraved pocket watch fabricated solely out of Howard material, except for the beautiful dial and hands brought many thousands of hits and numerous replies on the two former NAWCC Chapters, plus on our Message Board…while it was disputed as a purely Howard pocket watch made by Howard…the consensus was by the majority of posters…since the movement contained all Howard parts of their manufacture…it could be a Howard pocket watch.

    One well-known Howard expert remarked…in similar words…its value exists in what it is - rather than what it represents as a Howard factory produced timepiece. As with all the watches that came into my hands…this rarity was no exception…it was sold during the Cleveland NAWCC Convention to a buyer who at that time possessed around 800 [verified] Howard watches in both movements and full cased pocket watches. He was sent over to my tables by another Howard dealer who was at this Convention. Upon the passing of the original buyer…the timepiece was acquired by an NAWCC member - I have no need to name.

    Over the many years of my association in this organization, it’s impossible to count the number of NAWCC members who visited my tables and bought either watches or clocks. The clocks were collected and sold during my earlier years of membership and they were beginning to be too much of a burden to lug around from show to show. So I decided to keep a favored number and sell the rest and concentrate on pocket watches. This thought turned out to be most fortunate. In driving around the city of Philadelphia and the areas adjacent…including Jewelers Row in center city, where I made great connections when it came to buying pocket watches and the buying of parts and other material to repair those that were in need of such.

    During these early and [now special years in my thoughts] I was getting a valuable
    education in meeting and becoming friendly with the many supply houses of this community that sold watches and the horologic material that would aid me in repair of the many timepieces purchased from them. The area surrounding Jewelers Row was a veritable oasis that watered my appetite for acquiring many of the fine and often scarce pocket watches in my years of dealing with these merchants devoted to the horologic business and its wares. I note one horologic house that was run by a former watch repairman who took me under his mentorship that resulted in the furthering of my horologic education; not only that, I bought some of the implements and tools he used before his venture into the business he was now the owner of.

    From another of the dealers I became acquainted and friends with; his partner would go around to the many watch repairmen situated in the area and buy up much of thecomplete and parts pocket watches these shops no longer had need of, the pocket watch was passé. Time and the wristwatch and style of clothing did their part in the result of the pocket watch becoming obsolete. Just as in the future, the quartz and other horologic innovations would make the windup wristwatch also obsolete.

    Working at my profession in the Graphic Arts, I was close to center city, and it would give me great access to Jewelers Row in center city that was the connecting hub to this new horologic world I discovered some years earlier. It would be impossible for me to relate all the wonderful horological findings I made during my lunch breaks in buying pocket watches and other material I needed in my pursuit of this horologic.enterprise. Often I would have to buy one complete lot in order to get the one or two timepieces that drew my eye, and wanted. I have an immense accumulation of stuff.

  6. #21
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    Default Re: Nearly 52 years in the NAWCC (By: dweiss17)

    To read the full story of this remarkable and unknown find of a pocket watch fabricated from Howard material and possibly done by a Howard workman - who decided to make his own timepiece solely out of Howard material and to suit his purpose - disguised the timepiece with an O'Hara pretty dial and special filigree black hands - while using a Silveroide case in sidewinder style. No other watch ever left the Howard factory without the Howard name being engraved of the plates.

    Please go to Pocket Watches on our Message Board and scroll down to the un-engraved Howard, the story is written in full detail with many pictures.

  7. #22

    Default Re: Nearly 52 years in the NAWCC (By: dweiss17)

    Here's a direct link to Dan's Howard thread: http://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?1...ngraved-Howard

  8. #23
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    Default Re: Nearly 52 years in the NAWCC (By: Tyler K.)

    At the bottom of this thread, you will see a black box...on near the left side below the top you will see a blue line click on that, it will send an arrow to to top of the page, click on that...it opens the full story text with pictures.

  9. #24
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    Default Re: Nearly 52 years in the NAWCC (By: dweiss17)

    Page nine

    I must call it horologic stuff because that is what it is. Much of what eventually will find its way to the garbage dump. The large accumulation of dials acquired over these many years will be sent to a friend in California who specializes in horologic watch parts; many of these dials are worth saving, a few could be scarce to rare. Having over fifty [box covers holding all this stuff - watch material] it is totally impossible to make head or tails of what should be saved and will be dumped.

    Promising myself to spend some time sorting out what will be worth the effort of saving, I have not lived up to that thought; now that my knees are not as bad as the problem they were a few months ago…I can now stand for a longer time and at my discretion go through this “stuff” to sort out the worthwhile and put the rest into the receptacle marked garbage.

    All this horologic material was moved from metal shelves in the area where I have my work bench and onto a large folding table piled high in the rec room. Now it is apparent the table piled high is an eye sore in a large ground floor room that once held so many gatherings and barbecues. The back door leads to the patio and the two barbeques I have not used in some years. One is propane; the other smaller one is a Weber domed barbeque using charcoal as its cooking source. I’d be happy for anyone to come and take them away.

    Enough of this talking about food being grilled and barbecued, time to get back to the world of horology. Honestly, I wish I had half of the timepieces that went through my hands and were repaired and sold. But, as fortune would have it…I never had the capital to keep what I discovered and sold these many years of my career as a horology buff or a participant in this horologic hobby. Yet, I feel all the better for it, having spent so many years reading about the many facets horology presents to the true hobbyist; the many years my hands picked up a true horologic treasure either in the form of a clock or wristwatch or a pocket watch and marveled at the genius that went into producing that horologic gem. Little did I realize attending that first meeting at the Engineer’s Club, the effect it would have all the years following my walking up that beautiful, winding staircase so many long years ago.

    The following pages will be devoted to one pocket watch and one exceedingly special rare French Fountain Clock. Early in the years of my involvement with clocks, I sent out printed post cards to Philadelphia antique dealers offering my service as a repairman to any clocks they may have that needed repairs. Getting back a few responses I made the friendship of two dealers whose memory I treasure today. One dealer, besides repairing his clocks, got me interested in the growing of flowers. Both in the varieties of perennial and annual.

    This was an added blessing to my curious mind…I started reading about horticulture and of the many species of flowers available from seeds to the ready to plant variety sold by the stores that dealt in such. And, along with that, I started a plot that featured big boy tomatoes, cucumbers, squash and a variety of peas. It was my wife’s greatest pleasure to cut the blooming flowers in a variety of numbers and put them into vases in every room upstairs in our living quarters. Many a night we’d eat a late dinner…cutting the flowers and arranging them into eye appealing decor was foremost in her mind when she came home from her work…Evelyn worked for a Family Service helping immigrant families to get settled in Philadelphia and when ever possible to help ease their lives to a better family existence.

  10. #25
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    Default Re: Nearly 52 years in the NAWCC (By: dweiss17)

    Page ten

    Another flashback:

    Fast forward to Friday, October 7, 2016, I am thinking about writing the finishing few pages of this little story concerning my 52 years in this horologic Association. I realize during all these accumulated years much has happened to the large family I was borne to…they are all gone. I am the last survivor of many good people…people who led lives of care and decency. Never has there ever been any scandal involving human misdeeds attributed to the large family that emigrated from Romania to this country while my parent’s sisters, I understand, their male spouses may have come from other countries. My wife’s parents were of Russian descent; Evelyn, my wife, spent all her working years of employment in a Philadelphia agency devoted to the settling of new immigrants into the American way of life with as much help possible.

    Now, back to my clock and watch career in this great horologic society. In making many discoveries of products of the no longer American pocket watch companies, I have described a few of these important finds and passing them on to collectors who could afford the expense of adding them to their collections of the American pocket watch genius in the producing of these watches – that sometimes were the equals or better to the foreign versions of pocket watches that told the time of day, and often with extra complications.

    Another of these examples is the scarce to rare Adams & Perry #1448, a now completed pocket watch that I called “The Watch from Hell.” To begin with, it was cut down to 18 size - I like to think by the Lancaster factory, it also had the side screws to hold an 18 size dial by its legs. However, the badly battered non-legged dial was in the original clamp on ring that fitted the 19 size watch. It had no worth to this almost total wreck of a movement that has a badly twisted hairspring, and the motion work was missing, and no hands, I think the arbor for the second hand was broken off. The wreck was sent to me by the person who bought A&P #1585 from me…he bought some Lancaster material and this wreck was among the lot. With the hope I could do something to facilitate it to a running time keeping watch. Letting him know it was badly damaged and almost beyond worth the cost of repair, I was told to keep it. I had already spent some money on its repair of a hairspring and re-pivoting for the second hand. And, its owner did not want to go further.

    To me, it was more a matter of accomplishment than repair of this pocket watch that became mine by a matter of default. I spent untold hours among my huge supply of junk pocket watch material in finding the correct motion work. In short, the gears beneath the dial which makes the hour hand travel twelve times slower than the minute hand. This mechanism consists of a cannon pinion, a minute wheel and the pinion and hour wheel. More than once I was wrong in my selection of these important parts that would cause the hands to tell the correct time. However, while it took a lot of stick to it…finally I came up with the correct parts that did not alter the function or worth of this important piece of American pocket watch history.

    Going through my supply of hunter pocket watches, even if I had to rob Paul to pay Peter. No luck, I did not find what I thought was period to this early American pocket watch. I had the correct Lancaster marked dial to fit the holes drilled for that purpose. Getting in touch with a pocket watch repairman, I found the perfect hand engraved hunter period case with horses’ heads and a floral design on each cover.

  11. #26
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    Default Re: Nearly 52 years in the NAWCC (By: dweiss17)

    Page eleven

    This cover to A&P #1448 was a masterpiece of hand engraving. While I do not remember everything that went into its magnificent engraving and design, it was the one of the prettiest watch cases I ever had the good fortune to possess. Thinking back, it was a Monarch case, 20 years stamped on the inside cover, the back featured the wonderful horses and the front cover had the eye appealing floral design. This was one where the covers were photographed in great detail and all was lost when my computer crashed. I still may have put the details and pictures on a disc, I’ll have to look through quite a few of discs that carry many years of the photos I saved.

    The sale of A&P #1448…I had not attended a meeting of Chapter 1 in quit sometime, possibly a couple of years due to my bad knees. I seem to think I may have made mention on the Message Board that I’ll be showing this watch at the next meeting if I could get help to carry my merchandise inside to the table I reserved earlier. In my
    speaking to a young lady who offered to help me attend the meeting, this was done.

    No sooner had I unpacked my watches and displayed them on the table, along comes a man who asks if I bought the Adams & Perry with me and that he’d like to look at it. Opening the little glass covered wooden box with felt lining I took out the watch, wound it and handed it to him. He looked at both covers and then pressed the crown to open the dial side and without opening the back…”How much do you want for it?” The tag had a $2000 label along with its info. We quickly settled for a little less. Writing a check after I asked him for full information that satisfied me; he
    was a New Jersey member of long standing and I gave him a felt watch bag to put the timepiece into, thanked me and walked away. Leaving me with the feeling he came to the meeting especially with the notion to buy this scarce to rare timepiece.

    Deciding I was getting too old, too soon, why leave some fine and scarce to rare watches that my heir would not care for, and me already into my middle nineties - it would be best to make sure some collector would appreciate and pay for watches that I found - and devoted a lot of care and much more expense to repair.

    Here, I want to flashback to my earlier years in the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors…always having two tables to show at my horologic finds each month at Chapter 1…before I could even display and open all my wares at these shows, a horde of would-be buyers [special watches] always congregated at my tables…more than once or twice I had to tell them nothing will be sold until all my cartons are opened and displayed…it was no use, some of these so called buyers did not understand the words no or please…and would start picking up watches from the specially made trays already opened. We did have some NAWCC members who had no compunctions…with them it was first come…first serve.

    I also had some wonderful people, who monthly would come to my tables, and buy watches every meeting. One man I fondly remember, only wanted gold watches no matter the maker’s name. Another would buy only the best watches of those displayed that month. I cannot remember all the NAWCC members who would come to my tables month after month just to say hello and ask if I had a certain make of timepiece they were looking for. All in all…honestly, I would not know if even one of these people were alive today. Being an NAWCC Chapter 1 member all these years, I have seen many changes, often not for the best.

  12. #27
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    Default Re: Nearly 52 years in the NAWCC (By: dweiss17)

    Page twelve

    Over the many years of my association with this group, I have seen numerous changes; many become members and find a new home they never knew even existed. The opposite is also true; many joined and found this horologic group was not what they were looking for. It takes many people of like mind to beget the years we have existed as harmonious and flourishing we are in spite of a decline in membership from more than 38,000 to probably less than 14,000 today.

    Of course, we must take into consideration that today, any electronic gadget you can hand hold, likely, may accurately give you the time of day. Humans have inhabited this earth for probably more years than it is known…no one can tell us for sure. We hear human hunters bored holes in sticks that cast shadows helping tell when nightfall was coming. Other created shadows using large rocks, Still others invented the clepsydra and still others invented the sun dial that cast shadows on a mechanism built for that purpose. The hour sand cast was also a teller of time. In 1656 Dutch mathematician, astronomer, physicist and horologist Christian Huygens invented the pendulum clock in 1656 and patented it in 1657. This technology reduced the loss of time by clocks from about 15 minutes to about 15 seconds per day.

    Huygens contracted the construction of his clock designs to clockmaker Salomon Coster [of
    The Hague], who actually built the clock. Huygens was inspired by investigations of pendulums by Galileo Galilee beginning around 1602. Galileo discovered the key property that makes pendulums useful timekeepers: isochronism, which means that the period of swing of a pendulum is approximately the same for different sized swings. Galileo had the idea for a pendulum clock in 1637, which was partly constructed by his son in 1649, but neither, lived to finish it. The introduction of the pendulum, the first harmonic oscillator used in timekeeping, increased the accuracy of clocks enormously, from about 15 minutes per day to 15 seconds per day leading to their rapid spread as existing 'verge and foliot' clocks were retrofitted with pendulums. Looking back we really cannot tell who really invented the time telling clock, however, we do know the scientists and clock makers who brought it to near perfection…the most accurate clock are those run by atomic power. Of which the average person like me does not have the slightest idea what makes it run so accurately. I have read it may lose one second in over 300,000 years. Now that’s a real time teller.

    We give another look back and see that man has reduced the clock to his whims in the story of telling time…we see birds announcing the hours, we see figurines moving in unison in circles within the clock mechanism to give you the hour of the day…we hear pocket watches chime the minute, quarter hour and hour; we have clocks that chime on bells or gongs that do the same. We’ve had watches and clocks that sold for a dollar to millions of dollars. Of course, the million dollar watches or clocks were the exception to the rule. Over the many years of clock making, the styles and functions of these time tellers have gone from A to Z in their manufacture. One of the prettiest to come my way was the French Fountain Clock… a broken down clock from an importer of French clocks who did not want to go to the expense involved in its repair. I could not date

  13. #28
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    Default Re: Nearly 52 years in the NAWCC (By: dweiss17)

    Salomon Coster

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Salomon Coster (c. 1620–1659) was a Dutch clockmaker of the Hague, who in 1657 was the first to make a pendulum clock, which had been invented by Christiaan Huygens (1629-1695). Coster's earliest pendulum clocks were signed "Samuel Coster Haghe met privilege", indicating that he had been authorized by the inventor to make such clocks.[1] John Fromanteel, the son of a London clockmaker, Ahasuerus, went to work for Coster. He was one of many foreign clockmakers to soon make pendulum clocks following the prototype by Huygens and Coster. A contract was signed on 3 September 1657 between Salomon Coster and John Fromanteel which allowed Fromanteel to continue making the clocks. This clock design was heralded as a new beginning in the clockmaking industry, due to its level of timekeeping accuracy which was previously unheard of.
    The oldest extant pendulum clock is signed by Salomon Coster and dated 1657. It is on display at the Boerhaave Museum in Leiden, the Netherlands.[2] Coster died a sudden death in 1659.

    References


    Hans van den Ende, et al.: "Huygens's Legacy, The Golden Age of the Pendulum Clock", Fromanteel Ltd., 2004,



    • Hans van den Ende,: "Huygens's Legacy, The Golden Age of the Pendulum Clock", Fromanteel Ltd., 2004


    • van Kersen, Frits & van den Ende, Hans (2004). Oppwindende Klokken - De Gouden Eeuw van het Slingeruhrwerk 12 September - 29 November 2004 [Exhibition Catalog Palais Het Loo]. Apeldoorn: Paleis het Loo.
    • Hoijmaijer, Hans (2005). Telling time - Devices for time measurement i museum Boerhaave - A Descriptive Catalogue. Leiden: Museum Boerhaave.
    • No Author given (1988). Christiaan Huygens 1629-1695, Chapter 1: Slingeruurwerken. Leiden: Museum Boerhaave.
    • R. Memel en V. Kersing: Salomon Coster, de Haagse periode; het Tijdschrift 2014-4 en 2015-1

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    Default Re: Nearly 52 years in the NAWCC (By: dweiss17)

    Page thirteen

    this clock; neither could the 38,000 NAWCC paying members. Today we may have less than 14,000 and a number of them are Associate Members and do not pay full dues. It seems the more electronic implements we possess, the less time we spend with our horologic love…the world of watches and clocks, and their all but consuming history…that was so important to us when we first looked upon a watch or clock that held such a mystery for us. This French Fountain Clock was indeed a mystery…and assuch was the rare Spiral Fountain Clock I inherited from one of the Antique dealers that answered my post card in which I offered my clock repair services in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s. The clock was a total mess, a wreck to the mechanism that drove the spirals simulating flowing water. Someone, years ago, had let go of the click spring that held the ratchet and the huge barreled spring let go with such force that it damaged three wheels, luckily, none of the arbors were bent otherwise it would have been worse a wreck than at the present. Telling the owner of the Antique Store it probably was a matter beyond repair due to the fact where in the world would I find another two inch or so motor with a platform escapement to keep time?

    I was told to keep or junk it…the repairs would be extremely expensive….besides were would I find such little clock to fit and with a platform escapement. The dial had no winding hole. In the original story I posted so many years ago, the clock mechanism was gone and fitted with a battery of German make, being so old, the battery leaked whatever fluid it held at one time.

    In taking a closer look at this horologic monstrosity, I noticed one of the glass spirals that simulated flowing water when turning was broken away from the brass socket in which it was held…not worth thinking about trying to repair this clock probably fabricated around the 1860’s - it was put in a corner of my workshop to gather years of dust. I tried to find a glass fabricator that made such twisted glass spirals was a task impossible. No American glass maker ever made such parts and I was not about to look overseas (France) find one. It would have cost a small fortune to have a glass blower duplicate the broken spiral.

    One day, idly looking through an NAWCC Mart magazine I turned to a page that featured repairs to clock mechanisms, becoming a little bit interested, I read further, this guy was in Ohio and had a phone number, calling him we had a nice conversation; explaining the best I could I told him of the problems that turned the glass spirals and his answer was he could do the repairs, if I did not like his price, all I’d lose was the postage to and from. Making a long story shorter, he did what I had asked him to do and sent him a check for $450.00. The two spirals that turned to simulate water flowing into the cut glass little tank worked perfectly. I still had the broken spiral at the top that would not turn due to the glass spiral was broken off about a quarter inch from the socket that held it in place to turn.

    Giving the top of the clock another look, I noticed the brass trim hid the cup that held the spiral in place…while my mind was about 40 or so years younger at that time…I had a brainstorm! Extend the cup with a brass piece to fit inside the area to hold the glass spiral. This was done. Now all three spirals turned in unison to simulate the flow of water into the cut glass tank, surrounded by other beautiful trim it was a pleasure to behold. Even though my mind was 60 years or older…I still had the marbles rolling around without a hitch. And they were hitting on all cylinders without a hiccup. But still one problem existed…where in the world would I find the proper clock to make this - the beauty it once was? I did not want to use a battery to

  15. #30
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    Default Re: Nearly 52 years in the NAWCC (By: Tyler K.)

    Page fourteen

    clock to keep time. I did not feel just right having such a beautiful and rare clock fabricated by some unknown French genius who had a horologic bent, not only for clocks – but for the beauty a timekeeper could represent. While I just loved the way the spirals turned and represented flowing water into the cut glass tank…it still was my disappointment to come so far in the repair of this wonderful piece of horologic art…I covered it with a large towel, let the spring run down, and put it back where it was sitting before the repairs were done to the spiral mechanism.

    Even spending around $500.00 on repair and shipping, the money was well spent – should I never find what I needed to complete this beautiful timepiece. My life as a bug in the horological sense would continue, even if I never found the proper clock with platform escapement I had dozens of other projects to work on. Building the cabinets and paneling the downstairs rec room and stairs leading to the living quarters was done years before this project. I even built five bracket clocks and five grandmother clocks that were well received by family and buyers. We still had one project to accomplish in furnishing our house; my wife Evelyn wanted a special lamp for the two step tables I had to build; we looked everywhere, but couldn’t find what she had in mind. Finally, I drew up the plans and built them…knowing Rick Merritts who visited our tables just about monthly to see what he could buy in the way of horological material for Merritts Antiques of Douglasville, PA. We decided to drive there one Friday when we both could take a day off from our respective jobs. We knew they received much antique material from overseas; perhaps, they’d have the lamp she wanted to finish our house decorating.

    The drive to Merritts was about 40 miles from our northeast Philadelphia home. We arrived about 11:00 AM and went into the lamp shop area…Evelyn found a boy and girl English Staffordshire figurine ready to be wired for a lamp. I think we got the shade elsewhere. That done, I wanted to go into the clock shop area and give a look around to see if there was anything of interest to me.

    Miracles do happen!

    In one of the cubby holes in a wall cabinet…was sitting the resolution to many years of hope in finding the exact thing I needed to finish a project I started at least twelve years before…there was a familiar dial with Roman numerals, a little more than two inches across with a clock and platform escapement; just what I was looking for all these long years. I could not believe my eyes, putting a little pressure on the main wheel, the platform escapement clicked away to my great surprise and relief that I just found the mother lode…the little clock with escapement that would allow me to finally to finish this longtime magnificent horologic problem.

    After doing our business at Merritts we drove someplace and had lunch before I drove back home. Ask me what I had for lunch…no memory…my mind was too busy with what I just bought, it had a $40.00 tag…I would have paid ten times that and even more. What is remarkable the original dial looked so much alike the one I found at Merritts it was frightening! Why did Evelyn not get the figurine she wanted before our trip to Merritts Antiques? Sometimes circumstances can have the ability to make your day one of joy, or one of misery, This day, for both Evelyn and me…was one of pure joy…we both accomplished - she in her way, me in mine. Now this beautiful horologic masterpiece can once more function the way intended; not only to function as a timekeeper…but a horologic clock of sheer beauty.

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