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  1. #31
    Registered User ClipClock's Avatar
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    Default Re: first fusee movement: several questions (By: bruce linde)

    Smike I think Eskmill may be confused, there seems to be TWO legitimate ways of uploading images, one the way you (and I and many others) do it and one as thumbnails (which by the way cannot be seen if viewing using the mobile version and thus are kind of irritating lol). Both I'm sure are saved on NAWCC

    Thats a lovely fusee clock you have there, congrats

  2. #32

    Default Re: first fusee movement: several questions (By: ClipClock)

    I guess I'm wrong, Smike. But for the life of me, I don't know how you get such huge pictures uploaded here. When I do it, the images automatically are reverted to a smaller format and you have to click on them to see a bigger version. What photo format are you using? By way of explanation, when I see big pic's like that here, they are normally linked from another site .... hence the assumption. Let us know how you're doing the uploads. I'm curious
    A man with a clock always knows the time. A man with two clocks is never sure.

  3. #33

    Default Re: first fusee movement: several questions (By: shutterbug)

    They are probably pasting the image directly into the post, instead of using the icon.

    Ralph

  4. #34

    Default Re: first fusee movement: several questions (By: shutterbug)

    Quote Originally Posted by shutterbug View Post
    I guess I'm wrong, Smike. But for the life of me, I don't know how you get such huge pictures uploaded here. When I do it, the images automatically are reverted to a smaller format and you have to click on them to see a bigger version. What photo format are you using? By way of explanation, when I see big pic's like that here, they are normally linked from another site .... hence the assumption. Let us know how you're doing the uploads. I'm curious

    shutterbug -

    here are step-by-step instructions for adding large (but not too large) photos to the nawcc site. if you want to copy/paste/edit and make sticky, that's fine with me. i even used capital letters, just in case... a rare occurrence! 8-)



    ADDING LARGE IMAGES TO NAWCC FORUM POSTS

    It is possible to include large and clear images in your NAWCC forum posts... but you need to start with good photos.

    'Good' means: reasonably lit, in focus (!), and higher resolution. Images used in print pieces are typically 'high resolution': 300 dpi (dots per inch); web-based images are much lower resolution ('lo-rez'). A 5" wide image at 72 dpi is (roughly) 1/4 the size of a 5" image at 300 dpi. Web pages are (essentially) text files and associated images... the goal is to facilitate quick page loads by reducing image file sizes.

    Lo-rez doesn't mean low quality, though. While it is possible to down-size ('lower the resolution') of a photo without compromising quality too much, making photos larger just makes them look worse. You really want to start with large photos.

    NOTE 1: The author typically takes his photos with an iPhone and then chooses the second-largest image size option when emailing the photos to himself for uploading to this site.

    NOTE 2: If you don't have Photoshop (or some other photo editor) or just want to upload your photos as-is, proceed directly to Step 5.



    For each image you want to add to a forum post:

    1. Take the image into your image-editing software. Adobe Photoshop is the one of the most powerful such applications, but also one of the most expensive. Whatever program you use, you're going to want to be able to crop, re-size, lighten and/or sharpen your image(s). NOTE: this process requires that you START WITH A HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGE

    2. CROP the image. Cropping means selecting the area you want and discarding everything else. Here's an example of an uncropped photo alongside the cropped version:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    3. Once you've cropped the image, RE-SIZE it to 1024 pixels WIDE at 72 dpi (dots per inch). Different cameras and smartphones can deliver images in different resolutions... whatever the original resolution of the image, you want to end up with an image that is 1024 pixels wide @ 72 dpi.

    4. Once you have your properly sized image, you can LIGHTEN or SHARPEN it as necessary. In Photoshop, the LEVELS filter is used to lighten images... either overall, or just the mid-tones; adjusting mid-tones slightly can dramatically improve your photos. UNSHARP MASK can be used to sharpen your photos; 35% is a great starting setting, as you can re-apply the filter if desired.

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    5. Once you've cropped, re-sized, and (optionally) lightened and/or sharpened your image, upload it by clicking on the white camera icon in the tool bar at the top of your post. This will bring up the 'Insert Photo' dialog box.


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    6. Here's where it gets good... in order to display your lovely image so people can see it clearly, double-click on it. You'll get the 'Image Settings' dialog box... change the setting from 'Thumbnail' to 'Large' and hit 'OK'.

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    Repeat for all of your images. Your photos will look great and be preserved over time because you've uploaded them to the mb.nawcc.org server.
    i collect antique clocks because i get all that extra time...

  5. #35

    Default Re: first fusee movement: several questions (By: bruce linde)

    Excellent tutorial and explains the technique Smike has perfected. It's appreciated.
    H.J. (Les) Lesovsky, Alhambra California

  6. #36
    Registered user.
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    Default Re: first fusee movement: several questions (By: eskmill)

    I use GIMP which is an open source version of Photoshop. It has all the same facilities as Photoshop and will run on all versions of Windows, on Macs and on Linux machines.

    I agree with eskmill. An excellent and well illustrated tutorial smike. Thank you.

    Mods, can this be incorporated with the "How to Add a Picture from your PC or Laptop" sticky? I for one think it will be a great help.

    BigAl
    I don't think that there are any BIG problems. Just a series of little ones that follow each other like a duck leading her ducklings to water.

  7. #37

    Default Re: first fusee movement: several questions (By: BigAl)

    Thanks, smike! I never knew about step #6, and I'm sure others didn't either! There's always something to learn here
    A man with a clock always knows the time. A man with two clocks is never sure.

  8. #38

    Default Re: first fusee movement: several questions (By: shutterbug)

    gang -

    i was letting the clock run down and it finally has.

    in looking at the position of the chain and having read previous comments, i would have expected that there would still be enough extra pre-wind on the spring to still pull the chain... at least until it simply couldn't pull anymore... and yet there's still chain curved around the fusee part.

    i did try starting up the pendulum again to see what would happen, but it pretty much just came to a stop again...

    does this mean there wasn't enough pre-wind? that the spring has gotten tired over the years? that the final letting down for cleaning will be even easier than anticipated?

    or is the pre-wind just to provide enough tension to hold the chain in place, and what the picture shows is ok?

    thx,
    smike


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    i collect antique clocks because i get all that extra time...

  9. #39

    Default Re: first fusee movement: several questions (By: bruce linde)

    The nominal running time for most eight-day-running clocks is seven days. The actual running time may exceed sever or eight days while maintaining a "good rate."

    To anticipate that an eight-day-clock, although may operate twelve days, you should not anticipate that its rate will remain constant during the period exceeding its design of eight days.

    In your example you have allowed the movement well past the design of eight days. It is fortunate that the escapement did not continue else the chain may have "un-hooked" or worse, reversed the rotation of the intermediate and center wheels !.

    You ask in part, "does this mean there wasn't enough pre-wind?" No, not at all.

    The amount of "pre-wind" is a variable number of turns "discovered" during the process of "matching" the conical shape of the fusee to the "most linear" section of the mainspring. The process was outlined in post #4.

    It is my understanding that the earliest clocksmiths labored with the inconsistency of the then available clock mainsprings and in order to overcome or compensate for the non-linear mainsprings, actually designed each fusee cone to match the non-linear character of the mainspring at hand. Mainspring production, over the hundreds of years of steel mainsprings has, fortunately become refined to the extent that Dial Clock makers have more-or-less adopted a fusee which fairly well matches commonly available fusee Dial Clock mainsprings.
    Last edited by eskmill; 05-27-2016 at 11:53 PM. Reason: Add a word or two
    H.J. (Les) Lesovsky, Alhambra California

  10. #40

    Default Re: first fusee movement: several questions (By: eskmill)

    Quote Originally Posted by eskmill View Post
    The nominal running time for most eight-day-running clocks is seven days. The actual running time may exceed sever or eight days while maintaining a "good rate."
    To anticipate that an eight-day-clock, although may operate twelve days, you should not anticipate that its rate will remain constant during the period exceeding its design of eight days.
    In your example you have allowed the movement well past the design of eight days. It is fortunate that the escapement did not continue else the chain may have "un-hooked" or worse, reversed the rotation of the intermediate and center wheels !. You ask in part, "does this mean there wasn't enough pre-wind?" No, not at all. The amount of "pre-wind" is a variable number of turns "discovered" during the process of "matching" the conical shape of the fusee to the "most linear" section of the mainspring. The process was outlined in post #4. It is my understanding that the earliest clocksmiths labored with the inconsistency of the then available clock mainsprings and in order to overcome or compensate for the non-linear mainsprings, actually designed each fusee cone to match the non-linear character of the mainspring at hand. Mainspring production, over the hundreds of years of steel mainsprings has, fortunately become refined to the extent that Dial Clock makers have more-or-less adopted a fusee which fairly well matches commonly available fusee Dial Clock mainsprings.

    yes, but... it seems to me the clock stopped exactly when it should have... with the chain just curving over the top of the fusee part. this insured that the chain didn't become un-hooked, etc.

    since i'm going to now disassemble and clean, i will re-attach the chain per the last photo uploaded and then do the pre-wind as detailed previously... just enough.

    ... unless there's a better way?
    i collect antique clocks because i get all that extra time...

  11. #41
    Forums Administrator harold bain's Avatar
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    Default Re: first fusee movement: several questions (By: bruce linde)

    Make sure that the mainspring is fully let down before taking the movement apart, smike.
    harold bain, Member ch 33
    "If it won't "tick",
    let me "tock" to it"

  12. #42

    Default Re: first fusee movement: several questions (By: harold bain)

    Quote Originally Posted by harold bain View Post
    Make sure that the mainspring is fully let down before taking the movement apart, smike.
    yes
    i collect antique clocks because i get all that extra time...

  13. #43

    Default Re: first fusee movement: several questions (By: harold bain)

    Quote Originally Posted by harold bain View Post
    Make sure that the mainspring is fully let down before taking the movement apart, smike.

    harold -

    i very carefully put a towel down so the let-down process couldn't possibly damage the kitchen table (like last time... 8-) , put on my gloves and ... nothing. there was absolutely no tension left in the spring.

    i expected there to very little, based on the previously uploaded photo that shows the position of the chain and fusee when the movement stopped, but it seems that the last person who worked on it did NOT do the pre-wind and instead just let the clock run all the way down, hooked the chain back on over the fusee part during reassembly, etc.

    is it fair to say that the pre-wind both keeps the chain from falling off and offers a bit of geneva stop functionality? where one is not going all the way to the end of spring tension?

    smike


    p.s.: is it possible the chain is original? it is remarkably well-preserved....



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    Last edited by bruce linde; 05-28-2016 at 10:34 AM.
    i collect antique clocks because i get all that extra time...

  14. #44

    Default Re: first fusee movement: several questions (By: bruce linde)

    smike and all: I added the excellent tutorial above, about posting images to the board, to the one at the top of the forum.


    Edit: There is some concern about habitually enlarging photo's posted here, using smike's #6 above. By clicking once or twice on a photo uploaded without that step, it will enlarge to the same size, but keep the images smaller for easier viewing unless you want to see more detail. That is the preferred method, and also helps folks who are using slower internet connections. For the time being, I've re-edited the tutorial in the sticky.
    Last edited by shutterbug; 05-31-2016 at 09:11 AM.
    A man with a clock always knows the time. A man with two clocks is never sure.

  15. #45

    Default Re: first fusee movement: several questions (By: shutterbug)

    In my experience with fusee clocks, when all is well, when the clock winds down, all of the chain will unwind off the fusee. Very little spring tension will remain on the barrel... and generally, you'll find about 1 , 1-1/4 wind on the barrel spring setup. There will be plenty of tension to keep the chain hooked. The clock should try to run with this light tension, with one or two clicks, not winds, of the fusee.

    You must make sure the fusee iron, which is the hook that catches the fusee on full wind, is functional. The other gotcha, is putting more tension on the barrel, by excessive setup, or having a too short spring, can make the spring wind completely, before engaging the fusee iron. At that point you will be straining the chain and the hooks (or gut) and can easily cause breakage.

    Ralph

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