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pmwas

A Longines that has not had an easy life...

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Today I'm going to show you a very old Longines watch.
Is there anyone there who has never heared of the name Longines?
I thought not... Everyone knows Longines. Even if he's not a watch enthusiast - he knows Longines.
Longines surely is among the most successful brands in the history of watchmaking.

Let us now go back in time. Like... 180 years or so...

The history of Longines begins in Saint-Imier in 1832, when Mr Agasizz establishes his watch manufacturing company. It was, however, not until 1860s when the name Longines first appeared on a watch movement.
Making a personal remark - I'm emotionally attached to the brand, as a watch I got for my 18th birthday (some time ago) was a Longines I'm still very fond of. That's the third Swiss brand towards which I feel some emotional connection, along with Zenith and Tissot... but let's not drift off topic here.

The watch I only just got dates back to 1870 or maybe 1880s at most. Here it is



Movement pictures first. Looks cheap for a Longines? Well - I don't think it's fake. I think it's just had a very, very difficult life.
as you can see, the movement has a soldered barrel, both barrel bearings punched to tighten the and...
...yes, two PAINTED metal bushings instead of jewels. The movement is supposed to be 15 jewel and it used to be. As you'll see, there are jewels on the dial plate, so there must have been jewels on the top side, which someone replaced with metal bushings and... painted them red. That's among the weirdest repairs I've ever seen in my life. Painted bushings sic !

The movement was taken apart and cleaned...



A keywind watch, so not too many parts here.
Examining the parts I noticed the 3rd wheel is re-pivoted.Quite well but the pivot is kinda thin for the bearing jewel...



Due to the crudely made bushings, assembling the big bridge was quite difficult. But I managed not to do any further damage.
Now - the click. The click bridge is very crude and crooked and I wonder if it's original
The click spring is custom made, soldered, but copies the original design (I mean it actually was screwred down where it is in original Longines' design).



Surely - the angle, Swiss lever, single roller escapement parts are the best think you'll find in this watch.
in fact - i think the watch was all good quality once, but the rest of the parts have been damaged at some point, while the escapement prevailed almost intact. It's made of steel and mirror polished. Very nice.

Assembling on - all downhill from now, as the train bridge was the most difficult...



The balance cock has a broken regulator with a hook instead of pins. Telling by the allignment, either the hairspring or the regulator is not original.

The dial has two pinned feet.



Funny - the case screw no longer holds on to the case, so someone drilled a hole in the case and the movement, to fix the movement in the case with a taper pin. Wow...



And cased. The case is marked Longines, 15 rubis and it has a matching serial numer.
I'm actually a little disappointed, as seeing the listing I hoped for a 4 digit S/N at most...



The only matching minute hand I found is a tad short. Well - whatever...



The watch has a hunting case that's likely made of silver, but it has no hallmarks.



A very nice case, even though it shows significant wear.



Cuvette...



And the movement. It's very worn, damaged, but runs. A tad fast, but well enough.

And now:



Look at this pair. These watches are 130 years of watchmaking history apart.
I certainly like what I see - it might be damaged and worn, but I consider this Longines a great addition to my collection.
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Comments

  1. Dave Coatsworth's Avatar
    I have a very similar Longines private label in my collection - with a special connection.

  2. pmwas's Avatar
    That's a fancy one
  3. Jeff Hess's Avatar
    Wow. I would have thought the op's watch was fake.