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Vance Johnson

Vance Johnson

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Working on a Waterbury Rack and Snail marked "Patented Sept 13, 1898" shelf clock. Rack & Snail on back of movement, connected by arbor at the very bottom of the movement that connects to the front. On the front, the arbor has a small gear and a washer that holds on the hour pipe. The back side of the arbor has a large gear that prevents removal of the springs. The front side gear is very tight and I can't seem to remove it. Steven Conover Book 7 on page 107 shows a similar gear for a Waterbury "Canton" with "star" rack & snail movement, and show using a shim to remove the small gear. I've tried repeatedly to drive the steel arbor out of the gear as he describes, but I can't get the gear to budge. I don't want to damage the plates or the arbor/gear. Any suggestions?

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Comments

  1. kinsler33's Avatar
    Your inquiry would probably yield better results if posted in the 'clock repair' section of the NAWCC Forum, but in any event you'll want to post some photographs. I think I know which clock this is, and I was able to solve that problem, but it's been about two years now and I don't recall just what I did. Violence wasn't required, and I have vague memories of a weird clip or pin somewhere, but at my advanced age things get fuzzy.

    M Kinsler
  2. Robert Gift's Avatar
    Is it held secure by something difficult to see?

    Can applying heat with a soldering iron or heat gun expand the part enough to break it free?
    I have managed to get frozen parts of motors free by liberal use of penetrating oil and rapid gentle tapping.
  3. Vance Johnson's Avatar
    No, there is nothing holding the gear on. I've been using penetrating oil for a couple of days now, but I hadn't thought of also using heat. I'll try both.

    Thanks for your response.

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Gift
    Is it held secure by something difficult to see?

    Can applying heat with a soldering iron or heat gun expand the part enough to break it free?
    I have managed to get frozen parts of motors free by liberal use of penetrating oil and rapid gentle tapping.